Kill The Unicorn – Prism

The final few words on the press release for Prism, the debut album from Swiss metallers Kill The Unicorn declares that they “are a band to get excited about!” Greedily listening to the eleven track web of sound and intrigue yet one more time to continue concentrated attention it really is impossible to disagree.

Launching from a bed of metalcore ferocity, the album is a kaleidoscope of trespass and suggestion embracing everything from hardcore to groove metal and progressive to post metal whilst fusing an array of funky and jazzy bred psychosis with some classic 8-bit sound mischief. The result is a release which devours and seduces with violence and unpredictability like a deranged dervish; one which is a little unhinged, slightly uncontrolled, and persistently sending ears and imagination to lustful places.

Hailing from Lucerne, Kill The Unicorn emerged in 2014 and took little time in stirring up attention through their live presence which has subsequently seen them share stages with the likes of Promethee, Ghost Iris, Vola, Science of Sleep, Walking Dead on Broadway, Voice of Ruin and many more. 2015 saw the release of a three track demo, an encounter laying the seeds and hints of things to come; the joys and intrigues to be now heard and explored within Prism.

Recorded with producer Aljoscha Sieg (Nasty, Eskimo Callboy, Vitja), Prism hits the ground running with opener Motoko Kusanagi. As the guitar joins an initial 8-bit fingering, a tempest gathers behind, swiftly unleashing its voracious force as rhythms fly and riffs bite. Vocalist Pipo Thalmann is quickly there in the midst growling as a delicious hook and similarly tasty grooves entwine the aggression before the already intensive beats of drummer Matteo Leuthold raise their rabidity and pummel the senses. Already a fusion of metal is at fevered play, expectations are taken to the cleaners by the subsequent twists and turns though the band has still yet to dip into their boldest enterprise hindsight revels. The track is pure bait with the guitars of Ziggy Lebon and Raphael Zumstein as predatory as they are creative conjurors.

The vocal dexterity already suggested within the opener is pushed again within its proper successor, Ode To Spot. Unleashed after the Sinclair-esque loading of Dreams In 56k, riffs and rhythms sink their claws and teeth into eager flesh, the track savaging and gnawing the listener before suddenly turning on its head with a funk/progressive shuffle. Thalmann mixes his throat scuffed squalls with clean vocal and similarly off-kilter expression to match the sounds twisting around him; all the time the bass of Marc Sommerhalder grumbling with bestial discord though eventually even it has to join the swing before a death nurtured storm descends. Like Horse The Band in league with Pryapisme and Cryptopsy, the track consumes the senses before Wormhole To Gliese 556c voraciously infests the psyche with extreme metal hunger and corrosive adventure. Though it never truly deviates from its rapacious remit, the track is just as gripping as its predecessor and unafraid to follow where its instincts wander.

F.U.C.K.U.P. equally has a carnal heart but is soon wrapping its core in System Of A Down like mania and Hardcore Anal Hydrogen similar eccentricity, continually twisting and turning sound, imagination, and the listener alike. There is an early Korn like air to the carnivorous moments before primal outbreak too; adding to a tapestry of unpredictability which hits the spot relentlessly before the progressive beauty and stroll of Me And My Velociraptor invades the imagination with its compelling instrumental. Rousingly and hauntingly infectious, the piece has the body and pleasure bouncing ready for the invasive tone and touch of Conquistador and its tide of punk and metal hostility again impressively steered by the guitars and the vocal prowess of Thalmann. Tightening its grip by the second, the track flings the senses around like a rag doll yet seduces them with nuances and bold turns within its inhospitable consumption.

Through the punishing depths of Catacombs with its maze of sinister deviations and the senses stalking blackened incursion of Ausgefuchst, the album simply reinforces its dexterous invention and uncompromising extreme metal voracity though both tracks have to give way to the even more contentious siege of the senses uncaged by Rendesvouz with Cleopatra. Malevolence drips from every note and syllable here yet equally the band’s untethered imagination soaks every trespassing breath if without revealing the hungry boldness of earlier tracks.

The album ends with Pitch Black VR, a rancorous, skilfully woven and delivered savaging compounding the animosity and inventive craft of Prism with might and boisterousness not forgetting imaginative zeal. It is an unforgiving, mouth-watering conclusion to an album which certainly lit our fires and as that press release suggested it might, our excitement.

Prism is out now and available @ https://killtheunicorn.bandcamp.com/album/prism

http://www.killtheunicorn.com/    https://www.facebook.com/killtheunicornband/

Pete RingMaster 08/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Powerman 5000 – New Wave

Since first album The Blood-Splat Rating System was uncaged in 1995, it has been so easy to form a soft spot for the metal exploits of Powerman 5000 and all the reasons why are there blazing away in new album New Wave. Across nine studio full-lengths, the band has aroused and stirred the imagination in varyingly successful degrees but always left a potent impact on personal pleasure, their new offering hitting that mark with ease once again. Whether New Wave is their best proposition to date or indeed their most unique we will leave others to debate; as to whether it is one of their most exhilarating and addictive incitements there is nothing to question.

Though metal bred, Powerman 5000 has always felt as much punk rock in tone and attitude as any more recognisable punk ‘n’ roll proposals; an air which is at its most vocal within New Wave. The album opens with Footsteps and Voices, its electro instincts teasing and tempting as rhythms and vocal chants gather in the industrial background. In no time though, the track is strolling along with a muscular swagger, vocalist Spider One the ringmaster ready to share his spirit rousing rap as the rhythmic shuffle of drummer DJ Rattan and bassist Murv Douglas flirt with the electronic revelry. Like a fusion of Marilyn Manson and Hed (PE) but uniquely Powerman 5000, the track has the body bouncing and vocal chords hollering; its rock ‘n’ roll inescapable bait.

The following Hostage is just as manipulative, again bringing all its virulent aspects together before leaping into a contagious canter with biting beats aligned to compelling grooves and riffs cast by the guitars of Ty Oliver and Ryan Hernandez. Submission and involvement with its epidemic of enterprise and incitement is unavoidable and liberating as the track’s punk fervour takes hold before exhaustion soaked pleasure is passed onto and emulated by the band’s latest single. The warped love affair of Sid Vicious in a Dress lives up to its theme in sound, a psyche twisting infestation only leading to addiction as heavy grooves and rapacious riffery unites with the rapier swings of Rattan and Douglas’ bass grumble. As its predecessor, the song’s catchiness and ear arousing antics are viral, a toxic sonic trespass leading to dependency from which escape is not an option. There are plenty of familiar aspects to the track and all adding to its forceful persuasion upon body and spirit.

 The electro waltz of David F**king Bowie is no mean spirit in stirring ears or appetite either, its gait and energy a calmer but lively instigator swiftly tempting forceful participation from vocal chords. Its celestial meanders allow a breath to be taken though equally it leads to a hankering to be back romping which the song subsequently provides before Spider stands centre stage to call on ears and his flock with Cult Leader. An anthemic hard rock meets glam punk roar again very difficult not to get caught up in it does lacks some of the unique sparks of its predecessors but leaves the listener wanting little.

The alluring balladry of No White Flags settles the charge of the album but not the rich attention it continues to earn; the song a tantalising mix of melodic alternative metal and heavy rock while Thank God is a gloriously irritable slab of nu-metal lined punk metal as raw and antagonistic as it is uncontrollably contagious. One minute plus of primal temptation it sets yet another lofty marker in the landscape of New Wave, one teased if not hit by successor Die on Your Feet, a song of typical yet openly individual Powerman 5000 enterprise carrying all their established traits in its scuzzy rock ‘n’ roll blaze.

Get a Life steals the passion next with its prowling Dope/Rob Zombie-esque taunting. The track hints at and flirts with an instinctive tempest but keeps it restrained to only further seduce. That volcanic eruption never does not really escape even as the song expels a more tempestuous energy and aggression in its riveting stalking, again though this only adding to its show stealing majesty.

The album concludes with Run for Your Life, an electro rock nurtured, groove swinging slice of infection which in no time has hips swaying as feet and spirit dance. At times there is whiff of Ministry before Al Jourgensen turned his synth pop industrial metal to the song which potently colours up the Powerman 5000 creative theatre working away on the imagination. As it departs with a clunky abruptness you wonder if the song was a late addition or originally meant as a hidden treat, or indeed maybe a clue from the band of things to come, but it is a welcome and thoroughly enjoyable addition which lingers as much as any other gem within New Wave, an album which declares Powerman 5000 as essential as they have ever been.

New Wave is out now via Pavement Music across most online stores.

http://www.powerman5000.com    https://www.facebook.com/officialpowerman5000/

Pete RingMaster 08/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Regulus – Quadralith

If you are looking to be ensnared in some new and fresh groove wired trespasses, checking out the latest album from UK blues stoners Regulus would be one wise move. Quadralith is ten tracks of eagerly infectious heavy assed enterprise; a multi-flavoured affair from a quartet of highly accomplished musicians.

The successor to their 2014 debut album Smoke and following a self-titled third EP released a year later, Quadralith sees Sheffield hailing Regulus venture into a new plateau of sound and imagination. There is new energy and maturity to its presence and songwriting compared to its predecessors which in turn breeds a bolder tapestry of flavour and enterprise as well as new potential for future success.

The album opens up with Dominion and instantly winds a dirty enticing groove around ears before the robustly swinging rhythms of drummer Joe Milburn and bassist Martyn Lucas-Bewick spring their bait. As the guitars of Thomas Osborne and Luke Jennings add their melodic enterprise and hungry riffs, the latter’s vocals backed by the former’s to complete the potent lure, the track has attention firmly held. With a touch of early Desert Storm to its body, the song grows and blossoms by the minute and listen, laying the scene for things to come with its expanding net of flavours.

The following Last Chance To Die Young makes a more instant impact as the virulent beats of Milburn stirs the instincts from within a sonic cry. There is no escaping the organic draw of the grooves swiftly dancing on the appetite, riffs and rhythms courting that temptation with their own catchy tenacity. Vocals come with a greater snarl than in the first song, a cantankerousness which suits as both guitarists combine the imagination of their electric strings. Quickly igniting ears, the song builds on the strong invitation of its predecessor to really get things firing before Seven Tales Told gets funky and sultry with Lucas-Bewick’s magnetic bass leading the way. Merging blues rock essences with heavy stoner and that keen funkiness, the song flirts and imposes from within a raw contagious stroll.

The band takes the listener into darker depths with Bones, its heavy textures almost stalking the senses but again with a natural catchiness which only entices. Even as it slips into a blues croon, there is a swing to the rhythms which demands involvement as much as that coaxed by melodies and vocals, the potent addition of contrasting female tones catching the imagination. Its heavy, lurking prowess is followed by the country rock twanged Heart of Stone and the resourceful tapestry of The Dream Reaper. The first of the two easily pleases though lacks the vital sparks of many companions within Quadralith and is quickly outshone by the grooves woven, stoner heated roar of its successor. Taking best track honours, the song spins a sonic weave of temptation and enterprise which fascinates as it manipulates ears and body.

Poor Man’s Grave is no slouch in grabbing eager attention either; its instinctive swagger, if ebbing and flowing too much at times, a constant draw on which guitars and bass skilfully and magnetically conjure while Dutch is a slab of instrumental stoner rock ‘n roll which twists and turns with persistent boisterousness and ideation to continue the new high the album has found. Milburn is especially dexterous and compelling and just as potently backed by his band mates as the song masterfully dances upon the senses.

With a scent of XII Boar to its grouchy romp, Overcome keeps the passions burning, its lure devilish and infectiousness unwavering as it nurtures another pinnacle to Quadralith, success backed by the album’s title track as it brings the release to a fine close.

Across the album you sense a tempestuousness, an intimate angst but one used to drive and colour the creative adventure and energy of all four members of Regulus individually and as one. There are times when the album does not bite and sear as it might or personal tastes wish but it has a persistent potential which draws keen attention as much as the undoubted prowess and imagination of the band with pleasure the continuing result.

Quadralith is available now through Off Yer Rocka Recordings @ https://regulusband.bandcamp.com/

http://www.regulusband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/regulus.band    https://twitter.com/RegulusBand

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright