Exoskeletons – We Are Here To Make Things Better

Two years ago, British outfit Exoskeletons caught the imagination with their first release, the Get Lost EP. It was a striking almost rabid slice of punk infused noise rock which excited as it whetted the appetite for the band’s emerging sound. Since then the band has been in a process of “writing, gigging, destroying and rewriting material in an effort to find something new and more challenging.” The upcoming release of debut album We Are Here To Make Things Better is undeniable evidence in their discovering and exploring that new and individual incitement which most importantly is rather irresistible.

From Kent, Exoskeletons consists of members of Punching Swans, Bear vs Manero, and Houdini; all three bands which has certainly lit our fires in their own rights. Embracing inspirations from the writings of Greg Egan and Philip K Dick, especially on themes of Artificial intelligence, We Are Here To Make Things Better was recorded over 9 months between the September of last year and this past June. Released through Skingasm Records, the album is an adventurous mix of alternative rock with the band’s punk/noise origins which develops a distinct but connecting character over its ten tracks but brings an unpredictable quality and imagination to each.

Face In The Rock starts things off, the track merging from subdued sonic disturbance with beckoning beats and soon after the throbbing lure of bass. As the guitar entangles both with its acidic melodic vines, Greg Webster’s vocals step in, his distinctive tones inevitably bringing a Houdini feel though his guitar and the rhythmic imagination of bassist Peter Bevan and drummer Tom Bonner swiftly sculpt Exoskeletons unique textures and invention. The song continues to pounce and romp on the listener’s imagination, its kinetic gait and lively energy firmly gripping attention.

Even so, it is soon outshone by the following track and new single House Of Disappearing Bricks. It is pure virulent infectiousness, its firmly rapping beats and gnarly bassline instinctive manna to these ears even before the punk soaked attack of chords and vocals add to the trespass. The track’s post punk antics swiftly hit the spot, its noise punk devilry inflaming the passions as swinging rhythms and spiky hooks wake up a lustful submission to their angular bait. It is sublime stuff, pop discordance at its best and surely alone an unstoppable lure into the world of Exoskeletons for a new flood of fans.

Kuiper swaggers in next, again beats and bass casting an enslaving web as vocals across the band infest the psyche within another guitar woven tapestry of enterprise as belligerent as it is psychotic. Kind of like a mix of Shellac and The Mai Shi, the song traps ears in a compelling maze of sound before the more even keeled stroll of In Real Life takes over. In saying that, it pleasingly too has a rhythmic skeleton which jerks around with dervish like agility around which melodies with a caustic hue blossom. Passages of even calmer energy has a great feel of UK band An Entire Legion to them but again what emerges is a track distinct to its creators.

Through the catchy clamour of Crash Symbols and the crunchy prowess of Holes pleasure only escalates; the first, maybe without the striking quirkiness of those before, a magnetic cauldron of sonic imagination and rhythmic dexterity which seals the deal even before the brilliance of the irritable bass and great dissension of the vocals enslave. Its successor is a wonderfully dirty and cantankerous proposal with an addictively contagious swing which continues to infest an evolving landscape of adventure. There is a definite Melvins like ingenuity to the track but similarly echoes of the great music scene in the Medway area of Britain which the band’s line-up has been a major part of in recent times.

Again ultimately, the track is individual to Exoskeletons, a trait all songs process as shown yet unsurprisingly by next up Cicadas which is a more subdued proposition in nature to its companions but one rich in enticing hooks and dramatic ideation. Attention is putty in its hands and a greed for more overwhelming and fully fed by successor Show. It’s almost tempestuous start quickly turns to a bold saunter with another highly flirtatious bassline and spirited beats aligned to Webster’s suggestive guitar weaving and vocal dynamics. It too is low on the aggression of previous tracks but high on imposing enterprise and a flavoursome mix of imaginative post and noise punk tenacity.

The penultimate track is Dust; an expected atmospheric indeed haunting piece of sci-fi bred AI suggestiveness. Minimalistic but very potent, it has the imagination at play before the album reveals its best track to bring things to an enthralling close. Wild Swimmers is simply immense and for personal tastes leaves everything before it, and a heady collection of songs they are too, in its wake. From a distance it flows in with bass and sonic intrigue to the fore; both essences soon uniting with the most delicious hook nurtured melody. Alongside, a nagging tide of riffs work away, always there enticing even as the track twists through its unpredictable landscape. Bevan’s bass is once more manna to ears, its grumbling exploits as eventful and persuasive as the lithe rhythmic craft of Bonner and Webster’s resourceful sonic painting. Add the ever captivating vocal strengths of the band and you have a feast for the ear and a song which suggests we, as the band, have so much more to discover ahead with the Exoskeletons imagination.

Because of the Get Lost EP and the previous exploits of its band members which we previously got hooked on, we expected to find plenty to enjoy within We Are Here To Make Things Better but not to the lustful extent we did. Quite simply the album and band back up the declaration of its title in one of the year’s major highlights.

We Are Here To Make Things Better is released November 10th on Skingasm Records.

UpcomingTour Dates

19/10 – Maidstone – Drakes

03/11 – Ramsgate Music Hall

17/11 – Manchester – Fallows Cafe

18/11 – Leeds – Tbc

23/11 – Camden, London – Our Black Heart (album launch show)

22/12 – Chatham – Poco Loco

http://weareexoskeletons.com/    https://www.facebook.com/weareexoskeletons/    https://twitter.com/weexoskeletons    https://weareexoskeletons.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 25/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Siberian Meat Grinder – Metal Bear Stomp

A big rabid beast has loomed on our horizons, a hungry carnivore of a proposition ready to devour the senses on the way to the top of the metal landscape. It is Russian fury Siberian Meat Grinder; a band which has been laying the foundations for major attention for the past half dozen years but poised to mercilessly seize it through new album Metal Bear Stomp. A ferocious and virulent fusion of thrash, hardcore, hip hop, and plenty more, sound and release has everything desired to arouse the passions and set the body off on one brutal slam dance.

As suggested Moscow based Siberian Meat Grinder had given notice of their presence and intent through mini-albums Hail To The Tsar and Vs The World which were originally self-released before seeing a reboot upon Destiny Records in 2015. Last year the label gave warning of Metal Bear Stomp with the Face The Clan EP which featured a couple of tracks from the new album; hints more than realised and surpassed by Siberian Meat Grinder’s new irresistible assault.

In many ways there is plenty familiar about the album yet everything is woven into a combination and threat as fresh and individual as anything around. It all begins with the intrusive shenanigans of Ruder Than Thou, vocals and guitars instantly in the face with group shouts swiftly in league with their raucous invitation as rhythms bite. In no time surging thrash bred riffs drive through ears, the insatiable beats of drummer Egor herding the aggression directly upon the senses. The punk assault of vocalist Vladimir becomes the ringleader, the rest of the band’s throats anthemic incitement before the unpredictability of the band shines as the song twists into a just as potent Biting Elbows meets Agnostic Front like incitement before exploding with its thrash instincts once again.

It is a start to arouse the passions swiftly supported by the similarly insatiable antics of Hunt the Steel. Guitarists Maxim and Mihail drive riffs through ears, vocals swinging from their bait as band collusion waits to free an anthemic roar with addictive success. In the midst of the charge the bass of Andrei magnetically grumbles, its brooding presence a thick lure within the growing web of sonic enterprise of the guitars.

The album’s title track stomps around next, the Bear-Tsar of a proposal prowling and striking with the ferocity of an Exodus and spite of a Municipal Waste. Again there is no escaping the addictive prowess of the band calls; physical involvement with that and the neck muscle stretching throb of the track swift as the track tightens the already firm grip of the album.

The predatory stalking of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop is just as compelling, that initial prowling threat the lead into carnal rabidity which in turn blends bestial intent with predacious restraint as the song continues to ebb and flow in creative vindictiveness. Its instinctive rapacity is matched and intensified in successor No Way Back, the song a ravenous tempest of speed and irritability veined by sonic toxicity. Its thrash nurtured, multi-flavoured body is again an unpredictable proposal which twists and turns as tenaciously as the vocal attack, keeping expectations guessing and imagination gripped.

Enter Bearface brings a web of bold rhythms and sonic espionage to bear on the imagination next, its brief but commanding punk rock trespass a sinister infestation before things get all rock ‘n’ roll with the trash thrash roar of No Sleep Till Hell. Its infectious subterfuge is a contagious wrapping to its quarrelsome heart, a merger which ensures a blaze of incendiary rock impossible not to leap on board with.

Through the hellacious escapades of Style, a bracing cauldron of fevered metallic crossover, and the nagging bruising stomp of Get Busy, ears get fully battered and richly pleasured as recognisable traits get a unique Siberian Meat Grinder working over while Face the Clan raids the senses with nostrils flared and unbridled combative contagion. All three bring body and spirit to boiling point, the third especially viral with its mercilessly catchy dispute.

A horde of flavours collude in the outstanding pugnacious punk metal of Eternal Crusade, a track which epitomises the rich diverse sound of the band and its epidemic persuasion, before the album closes on the   adversarial roar of Walking Tall where everything from guitars and vocals to emotion and energy are ablaze.

It is a stirring end to an album which gets more potent and irresistible with every venture into its instinctive devilry. It is technically captivating, infectiously addictive, and a hearty punk infused thrash metal onslaught with a legion of extra goodness which is sure to stomp over all resistance to its glorious might.

Metal Bear Stomp is out now CD, LP and Digital Download through Destiny Records.

https://www.facebook.com/SIBERIANMEATGRINDER/    https://www.instagram.com/siberianmeatgrinder

Pete RingMaster 25/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright