Infinitas – Civitas Interitus

Today we bring you some melodic thrash metal from Switzerland and a debut album which makes easy work of capturing the imagination as it storms the senses. The band is Infinitas, a quintet stirring attention for a while now but has really been luring ears and praise recently with their first album Civitas Interitus. It is easy to hear why too as the release soon reveals itself a web of creative intrigue and drama with a sound much more than that earlier description suggests. In its cauldron you will find as rich an essence of folk and extremes of metal as thrash with elements of power and gothic metal similarly woven into its inventive tapestry.

The band itself first emerged in 2009, formed by guitarist Selv Martone and drummer/vocalist Pirmin Betschart. Its line-up was complete by the following year with the addition of bassist Pauli Betschart, violinist Joëlle Sigrist, and vocalist Isabelle Sigrist. 2011 saw the departure of Isabelle but it was not until 2013 that the band found the right replacement in Andrea Böll. Two years from there Infinitas unveiled their first release, the Self-Destruction EP. It swiftly enticed awareness and high praise the way of the Muotathal outfit in a year which also saw Joëlle depart and preparation for the band’s first album begin with session musician Hanna Landolt providing violin across the 2016 recorded Civitas Interitus. Laura Kalchofner became a permanent member soon after but too late to record the album though she does play on its hidden track with her e-recorder and provide backing vocals in other tracks.

Released earlier this year, Civitas Interitus is a concept album centred round the city of Lunatris which to slim its history down is attacked and torn apart by demons. As its tale, the release needs little time to grab the imagination and intrigue attention with opener The Die Is Cast. A portentous air rises up around the unsuspecting city and populace, a lone voice aware of the dark tide looming over its skies. Peaceful melodies and harmonies rise up next, a deceitful calm bewitching the senses before Alastor opens the gateway for hellish hordes to descend and ravage. Instantly a flirtatious groove grips ears and appetite, the swiftly striking vocal adventure and dexterity of Andrea riding its swing. There is a Toyah like essence to her voice across the album which only adds to her magnetism, an equal attraction just as potently conjured within the song by Selv and Hanna’s melodic often acidic adventure.

It is an outstanding first surge into the psyche, that mix of styles a web of compelling trespass and just as enticing within the following Samael. The song is maybe less bold in its invention than its predecessor but just as fascinating and arousing with the backing tones of Pirmin a fine raw contrast to Andrea’s melodic roars. With rhythms a senses plundering prowl and the violin scything spicily across their bows, the song only enthrals before Labartu ventures into the eye of the storm with its melodic oasis again surrounded with ever enclosing threat. It is an escape though only into the diseased psyche and arms of its particular demonic devouring, the sounds a corrupted fusion of celebration and cancerous rapacity as virulent as a plague.

Its irresistible dance is matched by the instrumental symphony of Aku Aku, a piece of melodic beauty with floating harmonies which gives respite from the tempest soon escalated by Skylla and its siren-esque sonic  waters where again melodies tempt and violin coaxing suggests as vocals narrate pleas and acceptance of an inevitable outcome. Both tracks grip attention with their infectious attacks and imaginative twists and turns, the second an especially adventurous flight of sound and emotion.

The outstanding Rudra curses the senses next with its death/folk metal twisted tempest, defiling and seducing them with its climatic roar while being sat astride by Andrea’s striking presence. With thrash bred riffs and toxic grooves infesting song and listener, the track simply grabs the passions to add another lofty peak to the landscape of Civitas Interitus, a plateau equally graced by the Celtic bred Morrigan. From its poetically dark entrance, the track stomps like a tribal dervish, those Irish hues inciting rousing crescendos leading to symphonically seeded venomous claws. As with all songs, there is a great unpredictable edge and uncertainty which never lets expectations get a hold, only intrigue and a hunger to further explore.

The album is finished off by firstly Amon, a song and entity hard to know whether to fear or embrace but one which is impossible to resist and avoid being enslaved by such the instinctive swing and creative maze of the proposition, and lastly through A New Hope, where the native tongue of the narrator leaves words unknown but sentiment open as a sunset of melodies and chants descend. Actually it is not quite the last breath of the album as from its lapping waves that hidden track erupts to add one final pleasurable adventure to the album’s creative theatre.

Before Civitas Interitus was sent our way we had not heard even a whisper of Infinitas; it is something we suspect a great many will be in the position of but for not much longer we suspect if the band’s fiercely enjoyable first album gets the attention and acclaim it undoubtedly deserves.

Civitas Interitus is available now @ https://infinitasmetal.bandcamp.com/album/civitas-interitus

http://www.infinitasband.ch/    https://www.facebook.com/infinitasband/    https://twitter.com/infinitasband

Pete RingMaster 03/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Devil Electric – Self Titled

Looking for some new dark and heavy rock ‘n’ roll, especially some with flames of lava-esque blues within encroaching doom bred shadows? Then there is a good chance that the debut album from Australian heavy rockers Devil Electric will have the senses buzzing. Offering nine predacious slabs of seventies inspired heavy goodness with a virulent catchiness in its grooves alone, the release declares a new mouth-watering force in town.

Hailing from Melbourne in the midst of 2015, Devil Electric swiftly began honing a potent reputation for their sound and live presence, the latter seeing the quartet play alongside the likes of Truckfighters, The Sword, Kadaver, and Endless Boogie over time. Last year saw the well-received, highly praised release of their first EP, The Gods Below, which saw the band subsequently lured by and signing with German label Kozmik Artifactz for the release of their swiftly gripping self-titled album.

It opens up with Monologue (Where You Once Walked), quickly raising intrigue and appetite for spicy portentous rock ‘n’ roll with its opening prowl. Entangled in juicy grooves and driven by raptorial riffs and rhythms, the track soon steps into a seriously contagious stroll, thumping beats and intrusively pulsating bass lures a bestial temptation and grooves a fiery vining of the senses. In the midst of the instinctive seduction the richly magnetic tones of vocalist Pierina O’Brien roar; her voice another irresistible focal point among so many in the song fair to say.

The starter is glorious, almost reason alone to check out the album but quickly matched by the equally compelling exploits of Shadowman. As quickly as the first grips ears and imagination, its successor swings on them with irresistible dexterity and endeavour, grooves again winding around the appetite as rhythms belligerently unload their intent. Marching through ears with an antagonistically commanding air, the track proceeds to spread fiery fingers, guitarist Christos Athanasias spinning a web of flirtation as the blended trespass of bassist Tom Hulse and drummer Mark Van De Beek court and invade the senses.

The sultry flirtations of Lady Velvet wind their charms around the listener next, O’Brien leading the heated vines of the guitar with her beckoning tones. Alongside her Hulse’s voice makes a potent backing, always understated in the mix but a firm texture which works perfectly with O’ Brien’s. Ultimately the song maybe does not have the same thrust as its predecessors, preferring more of a smouldering attack but it too is created from a tapestry of sonic imagination and rhythmic enticement this time with just a sense of physical rabidity involved.

Acidic Fire similarly has a fire borne climate and siren like call to its body, O’Brien the central protagonist but more than matched by the sonic weaving of Athanasias. In many ways the song crawls over the body and psyche, enjoyably searing the senses before the bestial gait and muscle of Monolith brings its own instrumental sludge thick crawl to bear. After its softening up of defences, the mercurial air of The Dove And The Serpent immerses ears, its climate soaked in danger and seduction as it dances in ears like a sonic equivalent of festivities bred from a mix of venomous isolation a la The Wicker Man and The Witches.

Both The Sacred Machine and Lilith with their individual trespasses keep the rich temptation flowing, the first with its invasive yet bewitching blaze of sound and intensity, the second with its haunting atmosphere and exotic mystique. The latter is an instrument which swiftly has the imagination conjuring whilst seeming to set up the atmosphere of the equally enticing and occasionally salaciously moody Hypnotica. The closing track and the band’s new single, the song is six minutes plus of flaming ambiences, emotive intensity, and sonic webbing; all primed to seduce and enslave the senses and in turn the imagination.

It is a mouth-watering end to a striking at times ear withering but persistently thrilling first full outing with Devil Electric; a band seemingly drawing on the inspirations of bands such as Black Sabbath, Graveyard, The Dead Weather, Jess and the Ancient Ones, and Blood Ceremony but forging their own individual incantations.

The Devil Electric album is available now via Kozmik Artifactz @ https://devilelectric.bandcamp.com/album/devil-electric

http://www.devilelectric.com/    https://www.facebook.com/devilelectric    https://twitter.com/_devilelectric_

Pete RingMaster 02/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright