Day by day with Reverse Family

We all have different outlets for extreme emotions be they bred in grief, frustration, anxiety or romance for example. For many an artistic avenue is the release from such overwhelming trespasses and so it is with Reverse Family who are about to unleash a daunting but we can already assure you irresistible adventure for ears.

The Reverse Family is the solo project of Dermot Illogical, someone probably better known right now as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British outfit The Tuesday Club. Towards the end of last year, he released acclaimed debut album My Songs About Life Mid Crisis, a collection of multi-flavoured lo-fi experimental goodness which continues to hang around in the imagination and passions like an inescapable itch. It was an introduction which commanded attention and breeds real anticipation for the next epic outing with Reverse Family.

Starting in October, Dermot is releasing 365, a project made up of 52 EPs released as one a week for a whole year. Before panicking, shouting impossible, or mistakenly thinking anything that massive has to be more filler than thriller let us declare that with the evidence of the sampler sent by the man our way in our hands, it is going to be an escapade taking ears and imagination on a helter-skelter of honest and emotionally raw but instinctively fun exploration; a journey given greater intimate potency by Dermot’s diary entry of that particular day by the way of ‘sleeve notes’.

The tracks making up the project were all recorded DIY style at home between Jan 1st 2015 and Dec 31st 2015 with Dermot playing every instrument and sharing every syllable. Everything heard is as played and recorded; no editing or tampering made with every song bred in heart and spontaneity. It is an organic air and array of textures which grips the imagination as much as the sounds themselves; a fly-on-the-wall like climate baring the same open heart as that of their creator.

The catalyst to the project was the death of Terry, the drummer of The Tuesday Club. His sad passing came just as the band was deservedly stirring bigger and bolder praise carrying spotlights, a time topped by the band supporting Toyah at The 02 Islington and releasing their most successful and critically acclaimed EP to date. It was a world crushing time for the band and especially for Dermot who was also coming to terms with divorce, life dictating and changing illnesses for both parents as well as the constant struggle of being self-employed. It was a time many would have buckled under but Dermot focused all the suffocating turbulence into his music and turned it into a creative quest, one which at times you feel probably completely took over his world but gave him a survival and now the listener a spark for pleasure and thoughtful contemplation.

As the tracks we have reveal there is no ‘woe is me’ self-pity fuelling the adventure. Yes, it scratches his open wounds at times and is not always sharing smiles but every moment is an open insight and reflection on his feelings across the evolving year of those challenges and the life around Dermot in St. Albans with plenty of knowing black humour involved along the way.

The first track swiftly grabbing years was Future son – The Twa Twa’s, day 8 of the creative pilgrimage. Instantly it reminds of My Songs About Life Mid Crisis with its post punk twang and Dirk Wears White Sox era Adam and The Ants like character. A gorgeous hook lurks within the angular clamour, Dermot’s vocal delivery a swinging flirtation matching the similar allure of bass. The structurally organic design of the track alone is a web of lust clasping shenanigans, the song in its whole a psyche infesting treat.

Some tracks have an even rawer sound and temptation than others, This house is empty (day 10) one which borders abrasive in sound but within its causticity is an instinctive funkiness which has the body bouncing and appetite eagerly exploring words and emotion. There is a sense of despair and also hope carrying new beginnings felt with the track, a conflict most of us are no strangers too at some point and can grab with nodding recognition.

The clutch of songs within the sampler show the great array of styles embraced by the Reverse Family sound, the outstanding I stand alone (day 13) a post punk natured infestation managing to sound like a mix of Fire Engines, Swell Maps and unsurprisingly The Tuesday Club with Dermot’s distinctive tones yet is unique in every pore while MP3 (day 310) is a junction box of sonic wires casting a Devo meets Pere Ubu scented discord over the imagination.

The darker, grungier Faded colours (day 336) offers melancholy at its most magnetic, In my head (day 337) sharing a sonically and emotionally haunting incursion on the senses as pained as it is corrosively elegant, and both songs continue the broadening maze of flavours and emotional tempestuousness within the sampler alone. Like many tracks, each is also a relatively brief encounter; fleeting moments in an unsettled and often unsettling day though Bad cartoon (day 343) stays a little longer with its melodically jangling and evocatively persuasive as Bowie-esque toning draws the listener with seductive ease into its own personal melancholy.

The punk ‘n’ roll of Do it just for me (day 344) hits the spot just as easily, its tenacious canter a gentle cacophony of guitar, rhythms, and voice while I built a new contraption (day 356) shares a broad grin in its post punk/art rock pop. The pair relish in the addictive prowess Dermot constantly finds in his minimalistic but oh so potent grooves and hooks, though he saves maybe the most addictive for Breathy graffiti (day 365), its electronic poking the kind of inescapable nagging lust was bred for.

So that gives a hint of what is in store for us once 365 begins revealing its heart in a few weeks. It would be a little unrealistic to expect every one of the songs within the 52 EPs, each suggested to contain seven tracks, will hit the lofty heights of those on the sampler but do expect each to be the most honest and spontaneously shared temptations sure to intrigue and captivate like nothing else around today.

We for one just cannot wait!

The first of the 365 EPs will be released digitally from 2nd October 2015 through Perfect Pop Co-Op / Nub Country with one a week through to the first week of October 2018. For more information keep an eye on http://reversefamily.co.uk and https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/ or through https://twitter.com/PerfectPopCoOp and the Perfect Pop Co-Op magazine.

Pete RingMaster 26/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Refreshing up with The Fill Ins

Since talking to  The Fill Ins last year, the US rockers has dropped one treat of a new album which is really beginning to stir attention the way of the Charlotte, North Carolina outfit. It reinforces their reputation of being a rising force on the rock ‘n’ roll scene earned through previous encounters and a live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of The Reverend Horton Heat, Koffin Kats, GBH, Total Chaos, Joe Buckyourself, Wednesday 13 and numerous more. We had the pleasure to catch up again with the band to talk about their new release and more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us again! When we last spoke, you all were releasing a vinyl 7” and gearing up for a new record. How did it all turn out?

ADAM: Thanks for having us, and it’s going great! The writing and recording process was really easy and fun, and I’m really happy with these tunes.

ALEX: We were so happy to get the Hit The Gas single pressed on vinyl. I personally think it was a hit, at least in my eyes! We’ve finally had a new record come out on June 30th titled The Time Is Now and it’s released through No Profit Records. 6 brand new tracks, plus 2 bonus tracks; Hit The Gas and a remix / re-master of Saturday Night (our other digital single from 2016). It really speaks for itself; it’s just raw rock n roll in many forms.

Taking a recap, was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and in what you wanted your sound to offer?

ALEX: Pure and simple, I wanted to form the band I wasn’t seeing around town; a straight forward rock n roll band. That town was Roanoke VA and that version of the band didn’t last long only playing about 3 or 4 shows before splitting up. Once I moved to Charlotte NC, it was the same attitude and mind-set; make a killer rock n roll band. It took a while and the right group of musicians by my side, but I think we’ve got something special right now and I’m so grateful to be part of it.

Since its early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

MIKEY: Our sound is definitely starting to really show what each individual has brought to the table. We have a unique blend of punk rock and rock ‘n’ roll with a little bit of country twang coming from Alex and Capp, with just a touch of metal and aggressiveness coming from Adam and myself. It makes for a unique sound that is fast, loud and powerful.

JAMES: We’ve all gotten better as musicians and we always strive to make our songs better as our creative juices get flowing.

ALEX: The Fill Ins have always had a rock core with a punk edge, especially once reformed in 2013 and started writing the Hipster Killers album. When 5th Time’s The Charm came around, we found a new studio and collectively decided to move forward in a more aggressive rock sound. I think that album has a lot more hooks than Hipster Killers and more thought through song writing. Once we lost our long time drummer, Adam joined us and it was a whole new dynamic sonically; really giving me a window to kick the group into high gear. Out of that came a new logo, sound and Hit The Gas, that was the most well received song yet so I felt we had hit something good. This new record just expands on that.

Do you deliberately go out to push your sound into new areas or let it organically evolve?

ALEX: If I’m being honest, it might be a little of both. Whenever you get a new band member in the fold, things will change. Thankfully it’s so far been for the better! Out of that, naturally you’ll start writing songs with this new member’s strengths and styles in mind. That’s why I say it’s organic and a bit of a deliberate act by nature.

MIKEY: I’d say it’s been a little bit of organic evolution of the band as well as deliberately writing in a different style. I like to push my metal influence over the songs as much as I can until the guys pull me back into “our sound.” We have also acquired new gear over the years. We started out playing single speaker lunch box sized amps and have progressed to 150 watt half stacks. We’ve also grown a lot as musicians, especially myself. There’s always practice to be done, new things to learn and developing a better sense of time, rhythm, phrasing and overall song structure.

JAMES: I’d agree with that! We’ll get in a room and hash out songs relatively quickly, but every now and then, a “what if?” scenario will present itself. Sometimes those work, and sometimes they don’t, but we’re never scared to try different things.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they too evolved over time?

ALEX: Oh for sure, in many aspects even more now than then. It’s never been about money, it’s never been about “making it big”; it’s always been about making an impact with our music. It could be that be the guy that picked up a record and he has a new favorite song, or a live show that made someone forget about work or whatever could be weighing them down. I don’t care if there are 5 or 500, or even 5,000 people in front of me, the passion I have for this band and the music we make pushes me harder and harder to be the best we can be. Whatever comes out of that is the icing on the cake.

JAMES: For me, playing music is always a blessing, but as more opportunities arrive, certain goals occur along the way, but we always approach everything within reason.

MIKEY: can’t speak for everyone as to what moves the band. I just want to have fun and play music with my friends and as many other people as possible. It’s a huge community and family I’d like to think I’m a part of.

Tells us about the inspirations for the members of the band, presumably a wide range with your different backgrounds?

JAMES: We all come from different backgrounds, so where I’m sitting, as far as the creative process goes, I base my creative impulses on something somebody else in the band leads off with, whether it’s a riff or a beat. We’ve gotten so comfortable and reliable as a unit, that knowing what they’re going to do next is pretty inspiring.

ALEX: I wouldn’t say one single artist or group has heavily influenced us more than the other. We really are a blender full of so many different inspirations and influences; I can’t really put a finger on one specifically.

MIKEY: My inspirations for playing and writing change as I get older and more experienced. That’s not to say that my old influences no longer influence me, just that new things pop up that I dive into head first and spend a while deconstructing it and learning from it. Lately I’ve been listening to a lot of video game soundtracks and writing similar sounding riffs and melodies. Mainly from the Dragon Ball Z franchise or old school Megaman and Final Fantasy melodies.

How does the songwriting work within the band?

MIKEY: Usually songs are born from jam sessions or by building off of a riff or tune that someone brings to the table

ALEX: Starting out, I wrote the bulk of the songs to set a baseline of style and form. Songs would be brought up and it would be a great tune, but it just didn’t really fit the rest of the set at all; and not in a cool way either. Once we recorded Hipster Killers, everyone had a better understanding of the style and Mikey started really shining as a songwriter for “5th Time’s The Charm”. With this new record, everyone has had their fingers in the cookie jar in one way or another and it’s really created a cool collection of songs.

How about inspirations for the lyrical side of your songs?

ALEX: I’m one of those people that cannot sit and decide I’m going to write lyrics. I could be sitting at work and all of a sudden think of a cool line and start expanding on it in my head. I have to write it down almost immediately or I’ll forget it later on. Same thing with guitar riffs; I one time was out running errands and a riff popped in my head, so in the middle of the store, I had to do a voice recording of me humming the riff so I could figure it out later. I may start with a concept, a Point A to Point B idea of where I want it to go, but that’s sometimes the most I can get out of it until later. I’ve been known to re-write verses minutes before cutting the track in the studio… haha

I’d say the only lyrical theme I actively try to avoid is politics. Some of my favorite bands made an impact without being preachy, and I want our music to be a release and not have a political message behind it. I think bands should stick to making music and leave the political talk to people that are smarter than us.

Could you give us some background to your latest release; The Time Is Now.

ALEX: The Time Is Now was recorded at Fithman Studios under the guide of Steve Coleman, Jeff Thrice, and Justin Campbell. It was recorded over the span of a week or so and another few weeks of mixing and mastering before it was complete. We actually held on to these recordings for a while before releasing them, mainly because we wanted to make sure we did it right and not just toss it out there for folks to consume and digest. It really is a perfect storm of killer songs at the right time in our musical endeavor.

MIKEY: The Time is Now is also our first full release with our drummer Adam. It’s definitely a powerhouse of songs meant to be louder, crunchier and riffier than our normal tunes. We spent more time on the recording process this time around and came out with a product we’re all pretty stoked about.

How about its themes and premise behind its songs.

MIKEY: Just keeping rock ‘n’ roll alive in a word of Biebers and Kanyes.

ALEX: The same thing that has driven us from the start; it’s just rock n roll baby. We sing about love, hate, fun, troubled times, just no politics as I mentioned before. We rarely have a running “theme” for our records; just pure, punch you in the face hits.

Do you attack the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

ADAM: When writing songs typically there’s a root idea and we just get in the room and start bouncing off ideas and trying stuff.  Typically the first couple run-throughs go great and the songs usually 90% done, then we go into the studio with pretty much 98% of the songs ready. We might tweak things a little here and there but we pretty much know what we’re going to do.

JAMES: Normally, we go in with songs complete for the most part, but if there are minor suggestions here and there that make the songs better, we take advantage of that.

MIKEY: Everyone in the band goes into the studio with the motive to get the songs knocked out asap… except for me. It’s annoying for the rest of the guys, but I’m too much of a perfectionist and my own worst critic. I’m never happy with anything I do and eventually settle on a best take. I also enjoy the studio atmosphere much more than writing by myself at home with subpar equipment. We’re very fortunate to have a studio producer who allows us to take as much time as we need to make sure we get what we want out of the song.

ALEX: For me personally, I hate not being prepared heading into the studio. We usually practice our asses off the weeks leading up to it so everyone can have a firm grasp on the songs we’re doing. Though with as much prep as we seem to do, there is always a song or part of a song that ends up making us slow down a bit and really take a look at what we’re doing. Over the years, I’ve become a bit less high-strung when it comes to “get in there and knock it out”, but I also hate wasting time because my favorite part of the process is mixing and mastering…That is the part I don’t mind obsessing over.

Tell us about the live side to the band?

ALEX: I like the fact that we don’t just stand there and play our instruments; we move around and give you a show. We also love audience participation even if it’s just yelling when instructed.. We want to make an impact; what that impact is I’m not sure, but you’ll sure remember us at the end of the night.

MIKEY: We try to be as loud as possible when we play live. Loud enough to get people’s attention without sacrificing tone. We’re used to playing in Charlotte where people would rather pay entry to stand outside the venue, smoke cigarettes and talk. Gotta crank it up so they can hear us out there!

JAMES: It’s just a big party. We have fun playing and encourage our audience to have fun with us while leaving whatever agenda they may or may not have at the door.

ADAM: I would say that live we very energetic, loud good ole in your face high octane rock n roll.  We put 100% into our live presence.

We asked you this the last time but interested to see if anything has changed in the opportunities for new bands to make an impact on your local scene let alone nationally and further afield.

JAMES: A lot of factors have provided opportunities that work well for us, but may not for others, so there really are no right answers to that. All I can say is that as long as you have a strong support around you, opportunities will present themselves, no matter where you are.

ALEX: We’re still a “spit and duct tape” band and we’ll probably always be that band in most aspects. The most important thing a band like us can do is market yourselves the best way possible; good graphics, great live show and the music to back it up. It’s not just about writing and playing music, there is so much more to it than that. The odd thing is that people outside our Charlotte NC bubble seem to dig us more than some of the clubs we’ve played since the start. The rock scene in NC and SC seems to be rather exclusive, and we don’t fit in any sort of “category” or specific “genera”, so we kinda float around the different “scenes” until we find the people for us.

The internet and social media is still a big part of pushing The Fill Ins forward?

MIKEY: These days it’s all about the social media outlets and using them as tools to get yourself out there and recognized. That goes for any kind of business, music based or not. You gotta sell not only your music but yourself. People have to want to know you and trust you before they become loyal fans of what you’re doing. It takes time to build that up and you just gotta keep pounding away at it. All of which I have no patience for, I stray away from any screen as much as possible. That’s why Alex handles all that for us.. haha!

ALEX: Social media has been the one thing keeping us alive and going today. I’m always thinking of new stuff we can do online that can set us apart from the rest or to provide something fun for everyone that checks it out. Music doesn’t sell like it once did, so you have to find new ways to reach your audience. We will always make music because we have to, it’s in our blood and I will personally not be the same person if I didn’t have music to play…but for the public, the music is just the soundtrack to the “brand” they support. We’ve sold more shirts this year than we have CDs and that is the first time for us. There is a definite shift in musical consumption and a lot of indie artists like ourselves that do not have money being thrown at us to really promote our music to the world; we have to become a lot more creative in promoting. Part of that is making sure your physical music is packaged and looking great; which is why we opted to get digipacks for the new record since it’s a lot better packaging than the traditional plastic cases. One thing I see people doing is rebelling against streaming services because of the small royalty pay out and to me as a fan; that is a really shitty move. I have a Spotify account and I use it for all my on-the-go music and then my vinyl when I get home, if an artist wants to take their music off the service, more than likely I’m not going to make an effort to go and get it another way, instead they just lose out on people learning the music and sharing it with their friends. In no way do we want people stealing the music from us, but I’d rather 1,000,000 hear it for free than only accept payment for every download. Pick your battles and find new ways to keep the band growing.

https://www.facebook.com/TheFillIns    https://twitter.com/TheFillIns    https://www.instagram.com/thefillins/

Pete RingMaster 24/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Casket Robbery – The Ascension

Last year US metallers Casket Robbery awoke national attention with the release of their acclaimed debut album Evolution of Evil and now they are poking at even broader spotlights with their latest release, The Ascension EP. Offing three ravenous cuts of their brutal and virulent groove/death metal trespass, the release invades the psyche and stirs the body with a carnal flirtation.

Though building on the individual sound of the album, The Ascension is a whole new ball game in so many ways too. It is the first encounter with the Madison hailing outfit since the addition of Megan Orvold on vocals, she having guested on the last album replacing Dustin Foesch, and bassist Derek Silloway. With the line-up completed by guitarists Cory Scheider and Troy Powell, Casket Robbery goes for the jugular from the EP’s first breath. The initial atmospheric build of Pockets Lined with Flowers is an intriguing lure which swiftly pulls the listener into the waiting turbulence of sound abound with the vocal ferocity of Orvold. Her rabid lungs descend on the senses as the raw tempest of sonic animosity simply grows around her but together it is a maelstrom of spite swinging with viral grooves and infectiously intrusive rhythms. An instant contagion, the visceral intrusion pounds and ignites the senses while the imagination is hooked by great magnetic expulsions of melodic craft and atmospheric suggestiveness.

It is a stunning start more than backed by the EP’s title track. Eagerly prowling riffs court ears first, their instinctive swagger soon infested with sonic discordance and again catchy grooves. Each aspect has a predacious air to their tone and antipathy, a hue coating the vocals and the overall character of the dark and heavy animus of sound and emotion. In saying that, a lively contagious nature easily infests body and appetite as it does in the first track, just with a more primal and fearsome breath.

That heightened malignancy fuels final track Lilith too. It is a rancorous temptress of a song taking the boisterous swing of the first and the raw malevolence of the second into its own individual jaundice. Again spirals of venomous grooving create a wiry web around melodic toxicity as the track invades the body with viral seduction, offering as the others death metal to devour and groove ingenuity to submit to.

Casket Robbery can only ignite bigger and greedier attention with their growing sound especially with the striking and fiercely impressing ability of Orvold now heading the tempest. The band and previous singer Foesch were a formidable proposition but Orvold brings something else to the table; an ingredient which sparks and draws a fresh rapacity out of the band’s music to match her own striking attributes. The Ascension is the band’s wake-up call to the world but still feels a teaser for bigger infestations ahead for which anticipation is already licking its lips.

The Ascension is out now and available @ http://casketrobbery.bandcamp.com/ and http://casketrobbery.bigcartel.com

http://facebook.com/casketrobbery

 Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Inferum – Modern Massacre EP

photo by Emmelie Herwegh

Making an introduction very hard to ignore are Dutch metallers Inferum through their debut release, the Modern Massacre EP. It offers four barbarous slices of, to use their press release’s term, “Mechanical Death Metal” but a trespass just as eagerly embracing groove and deathcore bred enterprise. It is a striking first listen at a band young in age and yet to reach its second year but one with the potential to make major statements within the European metal scene ahead.

The Eindhoven hailing outfit draw on inspirations found in the likes of Thy Art Is Murder, Lamb of God, Slaughter to Prevail, Meshuggah, and Gojira; a couple of which can be sensed within the EP’s opener and title track. Modern Massacre instantly wraps ears with wiry grooves as rhythms probe with forceful intent. Both continue to entice and invade as vocalist Morrison de Boer quickly shows his adventurous delivery, employing varying textures within his first assault alone. The sonic dexterity of guitarist Lars Deelman is matched by the barbarous designs cast by rhythm guitarist Ozzy Voskuilen, together creating a tempest as infectiously alluring as it is fearsomely intrusive with never a handful of seconds passing without new adventure and unpredictable twists being shared.

It is an outstanding dramatic start which alone demands repeat attention to the release and quickly backed in potency by the following Blinding Supremacy. Instantly shaped by the predatory tone of Stan Albers’ bass and the imposing swings of drummer Wouter Macare, the track is an even darker and more murderous proposition than the first but fusing a controlled lighter tempting into its inhospitable climate. Indeed it has moments which skilfully and imaginatively wrong-foot expectations and assumptions, creating a maze like proposal which simply grows more impressive with every passing minute and listen.

Rotten King slams its credentials into thoughts and appetite immediately after as rhythms scythe through the senses followed swiftly by a raw animus of sound cast by guitars and vocals. Inferum have just played with Cryptopsy at Patronaat Haarlem and there is a whiff of the Canadians to the character and technical tenacity of the third track and of Gojira too as it intrudes upon and devours the senses with relish.

Closing track, Incineration, shares its own almost kaleidoscopic whirl of barbarous invention and violent unpredictability; each second seemingly an evolution of the last but with a fluidity which breeds infectious bait for quickly ravenous ears. The groan of bass is as irresistible as the vocal enterprise of de Boer, both as compelling as the imaginative sonic netting sprung around the listener by Deelman and Voskuilen. With Macare’s merciless strikes on top, the song brings the release to a masterfully stirring conclusion.

Only further impressing with every listen, Modern Massacre is a debut demanding to be taken notice of from a band which with their already open creative adventure and fires increasingly burning are surely heading to major attention.

Modern Massacre is available now @ https://inferum.nl/product/ep-modern-massacre/

https://www.facebook.com/InferumBand/

Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

On Top – Top Dollar

It might be valid to say that you pretty much know what you are going to get from US hard rockers On Top but just as truthful to say that you are equally guaranteed a thoroughly enjoyable and rousing time with the Philadelphia hailing trio. The proof of both comes across a trio of EPs, one stomping debut album, and is evidenced again in their new offering, Top Dollar. The EP is another body rocking, spirit lighting romp of eighties inspired rock ‘n’ roll with the band which maybe shares few major surprises but offers plenty of satisfying goodness.

Recorded with Joe DeLuca at Why Me Recording in Gibbsboro, NJ, Top Dollar also sees the first recorded outing of the band’s newest member in guitarist Ric Haas alongside vocalist/bassist Jaron Gulino and drummer Danny Piselli. Whether it is partly due to his individual style or natural evolution, there is a fresh almost raw edge to the band’s sound certainly in comparison to predecessor Topless. Opener Lovin’ The Devil quickly confirms that suggestion, its tone and air a fiery proposal driven with a new hungry urgency which instantly has the feet tapping and hips rocking. Haas quickly makes his mark as a melodic flame escapes his guitar, the moment a trigger for a heated escapade around the bracing swings of Piselli and vocal enticement of Gulino. Teasing with LA Guns meets Mötley Crüe like hues; the track is one fiercely enjoyable stomp.

The following Walk The Walk shows a bit more restraint in its attack as a Rage Against The Machine scented grooving and attitude swiftly hits the spot. Grooves again entice and rhythms snap, Gulino’s bass a prowling incitement within the sonic blaze as his vocals heartily roar. The anthemic prowess of the On Top writing and sound has never been subdued but is fully uncaged within the second track and in turn its successor Everything. The track is simply balls swinging, chest thumping rock ‘n’ roll; an almost punkish assault so unite one’s eager energies with.

The EP concludes with This Way, track which may not quite live up to the heights of its companions for personal tastes yet burns its persuasion into ears and thoughts with increasing potency by the second. Again the raw air the band has found enhances song and pleasure; a trait hopefully they will continue to pursue ahead especially as the final song shows it works so well with their instinctive creation of melodic enticement.

Once more On Top give us a rich dose of what they do best, unleash familiar but freshly designed rock ‘n’ roll, and once more the threesome leave ears drenched in pleasure.

Top Dollar is out now on Horror Pain Gore Death and available @ http://www.horrorpaingoredeath.com/store/hpgd154.html and https://hpgd.bandcamp.com/album/top-dollar

https://www.facebook.com/ONTOPOFFICIAL    https://twitter.com/ONTOPROCK

Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

NoSelf – Human-Cyborg Relations Episode 1

Proving that nu metal is still a valid presence and temptation, Central Florida outfit NoSelf have just released their new seven track mini-album to excite ears and arouse the spirit. Human-Cyborg Relations Episode 1 unites familiar traits with the band’s imagination stoking individuality, sparking body and an already bred appetite for the earlier heyday of nu metal along the way. It is claimed there is a new revival of the genre; a most welcome second coming if band and album is evidence of its new adventure.

Emerging in 2002, NoSelf draw on the inspiration of bands such as Deftones, Spineshank, Adema, Nothingface, and Korn for their sound, spicing making a potent ingredient in the band’s new Matt Johnson recorded offering. It is flavouring which has enriched previous encounters but makes more of a hue than ingredient of the immediately pleasing Human-Cyborg Relations Episode 1.

The album opens with Casting Stones, instantly cradling ears in a melodic coaxing as keys entice. Their suggestive welcome swiftly draws the listener into a waiting raw roar of sound, the guitar of Justin Dabney a predacious tempest of riffs and grooves backed by the rapier swings of drummer Drew Miller. The snarling tones of vocalist Dylan Hart Kleinhans are enticingly tempered and supported by warmer vocals, the union a bridge between the savage and electronically enchanting aspects of the outstanding opener. As suggested earlier, the song brings recognisable aspects in its turbulence but equally a squall of fresh enterprise which has body and thoughts quickly locked in.

As great as it is, the starter is still eclipsed by next up Save Me; carnivorous riffs and the wonderfully gnarly tones of Joey Bivo’s bass chewing on the senses, their ferocious web sonic barbed wire. Similarly to the first, the track contrasts its ferocity with a harmonic radiance, vocals and melodies flirting with ears before falling into the onrushing scourge of aggression though still forcing their inviting calm to the surface. That Adema influence is an especially open and enticing colour in the storm, and across the release, adding to its drama as it tempers the corrosive heart of the excellent song.

Nudisease is just as appealing and intrusive as its predecessors though with a more tolerant nature, riffs and grooves to the fore from its first breath. The intensity of the first two is pulled back in the third though its fire is as pyre like but turned into a hook carting swagger which has the body bouncing. Slips into calmer passages are fluid and magnetic, the track revealing a bolder adventure than the previous two if less of their greed inducing savagery while successor Through Your Eyes also embraces mellower climes in its more mercurial atmosphere and proposition. The song though has a volcanic temperament and heart which fuels its melodic and aggressive sides, creating an unpredictable and rabid but ultimately restrained trespass which maybe teases more than fulfils but still leaves pleasure stuck in its previous high.

If there has been a more enticing start to a song this year than that of Outatime we have yet to hear it, the track beckoning with flirtatious sonic finger wagging before the funk hearted bass of Bivo adds its lure; swiftly followed by a rapacious tide of riffs. Just as tenacious vocals and rhythms soon jump in, their more predatory touch colluding with the atmospherically intriguing, funkily mischievous antics of the song and the similarly devious presence of Hart Kleinhans. Eventually its carnal rawness erupts in a contagion of an insatiable chorus before things ebb and flow in intensity with increasing infectiousness. The track steals best song honours in no time, cementing its claim with every listen.

The weakest moment on the encounter is Frisco but the fact it is one inescapably catchy and persuasive moment tells you how potent Human-Cyborg Relations Episode 1 is as a whole. The song has a definite pop spiced side not heard on the previous tracks; a kinder more deliberately infectious nature which has the feet trapping and vocal chords induced. There is something of Australian band Voyager to the song at times which only adds to its tempting and a growing growl that shows real teeth but lacks the weight and tenacity of its predecessors for personal tastes. In saying that there is no denying it commands full involvement and enjoyment before making way for the closing delights of Ctrl-Z. It too has an undisguised poppiness but latched to an imposing antipathy which hits the spot as much as its infectious escapades. The song is another which bears boldness in design and adventure to captivate ears and imagination but also a hearty tension of sound and emotion which grips eager participation.

Recently signing a worldwide distribution deal with Zombie Shark Records, the new record label from Noah “Shark” Robertson (Motograter, EX-The Browning), NoSelf have pushed themselves to the fore of this new wave of nu metal seeded goodness with Human-Cyborg Relations Episode 1. There is more to their sound than just that field of flavouring, one we eagerly await hearing expand ahead.

Human-Cyborg Relations Episode 1 is out now and available @ http://www.zombieshark.net/  and  https://zombiesharkrecords.bandcamp.com/album/human-cyborg-relations-episode-1

https://www.facebook.com/NoSelf/

Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Das Fluff – Far Gone

There is no denying we are suckers for a touch of creative theatre when it comes to music and you certainly get that and more within the new single from electro rockers Das Fluff, a dramatic almost psychotic web of temptation and suggestion which has the imagination as busy as ears and body.

Based within Berlin and London, Das Fluff is the brainchild of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Dawn Lintern supported by guitarist Stefan ‘Misty’ Missfeld and live electronics/visuals caster Christian Ruland. Ahead of an eight date tour of Japan in October and following the recent release on vinyl of last album Flower With Knife, its successor being recorded as you read, Das Fluff tease and tempt for all with Far Gone. Taken from that last album, the track imposes itself with style and imagination nagging enterprise, every second a memorable and relentlessly hungry lure.

As its shaker of electronic coaxing raises the curtain, strings like lures scythe across the senses quickly being joined by Lintern’s equally beguiling vocals. A darker bass tone rumbles in the fore ground, a great distraction soon losing its central grip as more and more hues add to the adventurous story being unveiled. Robustly pungent beats throb as those strings weave sinister suggestion, their rich bait adding to the surges of incessant probing which fire up the senses even more.

With its theme an observation on “society’s addiction to its own misery”, every second is a rousing exploration of the imagination in sound and word with Lintern majestically centring it all with a touch of Lydia Lunch to her presence. More like an intimate play than something cinematic, and just as impacting, Far Gone is an irresistible proposal for the body and imagination to dance to and more than a thick convincing that the next offering from Das Fluff, and their acclaimed last for newcomers, should be highly anticipated.

Far Gone is out now, see the video on our Video Selector page with Flower With Knife available @ http://www.dasfluff.com

https://www.facebook.com/dasfluff/    https://twitter.com/DasFluffTwit    https://dasfluff.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright