The Redeemed – Obscured Misery

The sign of a really potent introduction is that it is still grabbing new attention and support months after its initial release, and that is exactly what Obscured Misery, the debut from UK thrash metalcore outfit The Redeemed is making a success of. Offering three slices of imposing and magnetic ferocity forged metal, the EP is an ear pleasing, appetite breeding assault from a band swiftly revealing the potential for great things.

The quintet comes from the heartland of Surrey with its seeds sown with the coming together in jam sessions of band founder Anthony Wiseman with fellow guitarist Ben Newton back in 2013. A mutual love for bands such as As I Lay Dying, August Burns Red, Inflames, and Caliban cemented their creative link, songs soon emerging from the pen of Wiseman and expanded with the lead guitar prowess of Newton. Subsequently after a few misses, a stable full line-up emerged with the addition of bassist Josh Lightfoot and drummer Steve Dun, eventually vocalist, once of Piss Viper, completing the band. Obscured Misery is the band’s first onslaught and one, with its creative web and striking dexterity, relentlessly making an impressive invitation to new attention.

The EP’s title track opens things up, Obscured Misery entangling ears in a maze of Newton’s creative tendrils, his guitar spewing sonic vines with skill and ease as a rhythmic intensity rumbles and then bursts. The throat raw tones of Fletcher are just as quickly surging through ears, growling with discontent as bass and rhythm guitar almost swing in attitude and enterprise. The song’s emerging landscape is a tapestry of twists and turns, never taking a moment to relax as neither can the listener as torrents of imagination loaded textures and eventful dexterity enjoyably impose. Forged on a host of metal bred styles, the track is a striking start displaying the individual and united zeal forged skills of the band but equally a maturely inventive composure.

The Concept follows and equally strikes a chord with ears and appetite in no time especially with Lightfoot revealing his clean vocal strength for a great contrast and complement to the rasping tenacity of Fletcher. As ravenous in character and tone as its predecessor, the song also slips into calmer waters with fluid adventure though never settling there too long before its volcanic heart and creative blaze resurfaces and drives things on again with Newton’s prowess exceptional throughout.

The EP is completed by Last Mistake; itself a skilfully bred maelstrom of craft and creative attributes leaving already impressed ears greedier. Certainly it lacks something indefinable compared to its companions on personal tastes but only accentuates and reinforces the real pleasure of being surrounded by the EP’s creative tempest with only its fade out something to grumble at and that is just a personal bugbear of any song.

Together the trio of tracks declare The Redeemed as a band attention is a forgone conclusion for with the promise of bigger and bolder exploits ahead breeding just as strong anticipation for those things to come. The UK just might have a new major force in the making.

The Obscured Misery EP is out now @ https://theredeemeduk.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/TheRedeemedUK/    https://theredeemeduk.com/

 Pete RingMaster 26/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bloodclot – Up in Arms

Pic Rick Rodney

Bringing together the highly recognised talent of certain individuals from various acclaimed bands does not always guarantee something special but in the case of Bloodclot, it feels a given such the instinctive union between its collective. The band is the coming together of Cro-Mags vocalist John Joseph, former Danzig and Murphy’s Law guitarist Todd Youth, drummer Joey Castillo formerly of Queens of the Stone Age, Danzig, and Eagles of Death Metal, and Mondo Generator frontman and ex- Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss bassist Nick Oliveri. Together they confirm that given with debut album Up in Arms, a physical and lyrical roar of hardcore defiance.

Unleashing twelve ravenous slices of punk rock with more inescapable hooks than found in Leatherface’s pantry, all fuelled by raw irritability at the state of the world today, Up in Arms is a crowd uniting battle cry. It fuses familiar essences with the fresh appetite and invention of a quartet seemingly destined to come together at some point. Everything about it is as organic as it is rabid, as challenging as it is rousing; taking no prisoners but rewarding those who it devours time and time again.

The album’s title track crashes in on the listener first, springing from an invasive sonic mist with a slavery of guitar and rhythmic predation as Joseph pokes and stirs the senses with voice and word. Castillo’s beats are rapier sharp and imposing, Oliveri’s bass carries an infectious brooding whilst Youth’s riffs and hooks ensnare across four eventful minutes.

It is an ear gripping, appetite inflaming beginning which only kicks up a gear with the following Fire, a belligerent brawl of punk ‘n’ roll instantly chaining ears with a  virulent hook as rhythms jab and incite. If the Angelic Upstarts was merged with Sick Of It All, this could be their anthem while Manic infuses an even greater physical psychosis and unforgiving attitude to the torrential gait of its predecessor in its own addictive multi-flavoured rumble.

Through the sonic call to arms scourge of Kill the Beast and the Dead Kennedys scented Prayer, new twists of sound and invention force themselves through ears, each with a virulent strain of spiky hooks and body twisting grooves, while their successor has things bouncing like a dervish. Siva / Rudra is a contagion of enterprise as cantankerous as it is exotically seductive marked, as all three, by Oliveri springing basslines as funky as they are carnal. Alongside, Youth’s riffs and grooves come as primal as they are compelling whilst Joseph squeezes every ounce of uncompromising adventure and emotional incitement out of tone and syllable.

Soldiers of the New Babylon locks metal and punk together in its prickly vent, a testy proposition woven with nagging riffs and a magnetically throbbing bassline before Kali throws all those attributes into an insatiable maelstrom of punk rock temptation, taking best track honours along the way. Barely seeing the one minute mark, the track is irresistible but swiftly rivalled by the crabby assault of Slow Kill Genocide, the catchiness moment within Up in Arms and arguably the most choleric.

Pure punk rock truculence shapes the breath-sapping antics of the following Slipping into Darkness, Oliveri spawning his most addictive moment within the album bound in the searing flames of Youth’s guitar as vocals and beats vent their animosity with Life as One backing up its triumph with its mercurial but always commandingly imposing tapestry of quarrel and imagination.

The album is closed by You’ll Be the Death of Me, a slab of rock ‘n’ roll taking big chunks out of the senses as it excites with its Lard-esque espionage. Addiction has never been more vicious and seductive within three and a half minutes, certainly in recent times, as that spawned by the outstanding finale to one of the year’s biggest treats so far.

Produced by Zeuss (Hatebreed, Revocation) and mixed by Kyle McAulay at NRG, Up in Arms transcends being just a great release from another so called ‘super group’, it has given hardcore a fresh new breath and snarl which we can only hope is the first of many gales from Bloodclot.

Up in Arms is out now on Metal Blade Records across most stores and @ https://bloodclot.bandcamp.com/album/up-in-arms

https://www.facebook.com/bloodclotofficial/   https://www.instagram.com/Bloodclot2016/

Pete RingMaster 26/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright