Pig – Prey & Obey

If there is a more potent manipulator of body, imagination, and spirit than Raymond Watts it is hard to think of them especially as the latest <PÎG> EP is infesting the psyche with virulent ease. The mastermind behind <PÎG> and a founding member of KMFDM, Watts has infested the senses and passions with frequent regularity since the eighties whether in his projects or in collusion with numerous others, a long list we will leave you to explore, the Prey & Obey EP now adding to that tide of irresistible industrial rock bred temptations and trespasses.

Consisting of three new psyche trespassing incitements with drama fuelled remixes of each backing them up, Prey & Obey embeds itself in ears and appetite straight away with its title track. Guitars instantly rub themselves upon the senses, their raw intensive strokes almost flirtatious as thicker brooding textures come with rhythms and vocals. With Marc Heal and Phil Barry of Cubanate in league with Watts, the track prowls and preys on the senses, Watts like a dark conjuror as hooks and grooves crowd and litter washes of industrial toxicity. It is a glorious web of intrigue and danger, subservience coaxed and demanded by the track’s rampant rhythmic muscle as well as its virulent sonic and electronic dexterity.

The robustly stirring encounter is followed by The Revelation, an even more imposingly catchy enticement body and vocal chords alone fall before in swift time. Co-written with Ben Christo, long-serving guitarist with The Sisters of Mercy, the track roams with a predacious intent, its creative indoctrination built on waves of persistence honed into thought provoking, body twisting primal seduction. With an additional Ministry-esque nagging around glimpses of cinematic theatre, the song is pure devil spawn scheming, Watts the insidious engineer.

The Cult of Chaos ventures across a calmer landscape of persuasion though the song written with former Combichrist member Z.Marr shares its own individual and challenging shadows. Their dark edges court the mellower presence of vocals and melodic suggestion, the song’s infection carrying eighties industrial flavourings merging with harsher textures reflecting the world today. Transfixing in its throbbing repetition, magnetic in its harmonic and melodic tapestry, the track beguiles and intrudes with equal ingenuity; addiction the guaranteed response.

Completing the release is firstly a psychotic remix of the track Prey & Obey by Leaether Strip, the track given a make-over resembling the bastard result of Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers meeting Celldweller. Its inescapable stomp is followed by the Z.Marr Revelectrix Mix of The Revelation; a version which simultaneously feel heroic and serial killer like in its tone and physical intent.

Completed by the En Esch Remix of the opener, a subdued but enticing take, the Prey & Obey EP is pure industrial corruption bred with the finest creative toxins. Each of its three tracks is a rabidly tempting and resonating anthem backed by highly evocative alternative aspects; what more would you want?

Prey & Obey is out now through Metropolis Records @ https://metropolisrecords.bandcamp.com/album/prey-obey

https://pigindustries.com/    https://www.facebook.com/pigindustries/    https://twitter.com/raymondwatts

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Toxik – Breaking Class

As the number of metal bands returning after extensive breaks or simply break-ups often decades earlier keeps going up so are the amount of impressive releases emerging from these reunions. Adding to the list and almost heading it is the new EP from US thrashers Toxik. Offering three tracks of the genre in its old school breeding, Breaking Class is everything that is irresistible within thrash metal with a healthy freshness linked to experience that newcomers can only learn from and be inspired by.

Subsequently one of the most potent forces with thrash once emerging in 1985, New York hailing Toxik released a pair of increasingly recognised as classic albums in World Circus (1987) and Think This (1989) as well as built a potent live stature which included sharing stages and touring with the likes of King Diamond, Testament, Dream Theater, Exodus, Pantera, Candlemass and many more. Disbanding in 1982, interest in the band was clearly evident with the release of a pair of live DVDs in 2007 and 2010. Announcing their return three years after the second DVD with Shadows Fall’s Jason Bittner replacing original drummer Tad Leger, Toxik very successfully toured Europe and South America showing the lingering support for the band. Since then the line-up has seen James D’Maria of Generation Kill replacing Bittner and vocalist Charles Sabin (from the band’s second album, Think This) taking over from original frontman Mike Sanders as well as bassist Shane Boulos linking up with band founder and guitarist Josh Christian. It is a unit which seems to be a perfect fit as Breaking Class ravages the senses, an organic roar driving its rapacious sound and intent from the EP’s opening seconds.

Those first moments come courtesy of Stand Up, the track spiralling from an initial sample woven lure with wiry guitar swirling around senses jabbing beats. Straight away instincts for anthemic metal are awoken, vocals a rousing incitement backed by hungry riffs and a brooding bass line which almost dances with an established appetite for its flavours. There is a great Anthrax like tenacity and tone to the track around its chorus but equally a modern crossover essence bringing whiffs of bands such as Suicidal Tendencies and Municipal Waste into play but all spices assimilated in a proposal familiar, new, and distinct to Toxik.

The outstanding start is more than matched by the EP’s title track, Breaking Class a devilish surge of riffs and whipping rhythms fuelled by an energy and devilment just as evident in Sabin’s instinctively persuasive vocals and tenacity. Christian similarly has ears and imagination hooked with his aggressive and inventive web of riffs and sonic enterprise, never allowing the listener to settle without adding a new twist then another then….

As compelling as it is riotous, the track is itself more than matched by the closing Psyop; that healthy brew of flavours within the opener uncaged again within its more predatory climate and gait and again involved in an adventurous and almost challengingly unpredictable proposal. It maybe old school nurtured but the song, as its companions, show that does not mean things have to be restrained in boldness and imagination and they certainly are not in the hands of Toxik.

With hints of a new album in the works, it is as if Toxik has never been away just taking their time to create what is one of the most enjoyable thrash stomps of recent years.

The Breaking Class EP is released August 4th with re-ordering available now @ https://toxik.bandcamp.com/album/breaking-class

https://www.facebook.com/TOXIKMETAL/

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Reckless Intentions – Lights EP

UK outfit Reckless Intentions might be primarily tagged as pop punks but as their debut EP shows, they have an instinctive devilment and creative belligerence which reveals there is much more to their aggressively magnetic sound.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of Green Day, The Clash, and Foo Fighters through to others such as All Time Low and Moose Blood, Reckless Intentions host varied flavours in their music which is clearly audible and potent within the Lights EP. Equally, the Brighton hailing quartet bring an individual character to their songs and presence which is maybe still slightly more potential than realisation but is already helping shape them into a prospect which stands out.

Formed in 2016, the band concentrated scene last year on establishing themselves on the south coast music, and successfully so, before linking up with Alex Gordon at Brighton Electric Studios to work on and record their first release in the sprightly shape of Lights. With its five boisterous tracks, the EP quickly shows it has the intent and energy to stir up richer attention the way of the foursome but more so the imagination to make Reckless Intentions a rather exciting prospect.

The EP opens with the outstanding Ghost Town, a song swiftly making a successful claim for best moment and most potent lure within Lights. With a great slightly off-kilter indie rock revelry to its punk rock tenacity, the track like a mix of Asylums and The Wildhearts, things are swiftly bold and sweaty as the swinging beats of  Josh Woolnough scythe through the nagging riffs and spiky grooves of guitarists Matty Halliwell and Lewis Horsley respectively. The energetic vocals of the former equally inject an energy and fresh identity to the encounter, it all colluding in an adventurous and unpredictable mix driven by the alluringly throbbing groan of Laurence Burkitt’s bassline. In no time body and vocal chords are enlisted by the arousing antics of the song, its dynamic and almost bitchy start the perfect introduction to Reckless Intentions.

Stitches, the band’s latest single is next, its melodic bait and harmonic enticement quickly flirting with ears. The hooks of Horsley beckon within a more familiar temptation of sound; the track openly sharing All Time Low meets Brand New like essences within its infectiously swinging exploits. Halliwell again makes a potent vocal lead, his tones giving the track something more unique than other pop punk outfits though something its enjoyable sounds arguably lack a touch. Nevertheless, the song hits the spot before evolving into the short instrumental of the EP’s title track, a piece which neither detracts or adds to the overall strength of the release but keeps an appetite for its adventure on board.

The following Outcast only enriches the fun though, its instant Smash Mouth like swagger led by the ever flirtatious bass easy to get hooked on prime bait with vocals again a strong pull at its core. Becoming more punk ‘n’ roll with every lively beat and niggling riff, the song growls at and flirts with the listener, all the time brewing a pop catchiness which has hips enlisted in quick time. The song also reveals yet another hue to the band’s songwriting and sound, a variety exposed once more by closing song Home. With his own suggestive piano melody alongside, Halliwell plaintively croons from the speakers; melancholy lining his words and fingers. Alluring ears with ease, things only become more intense and potent as the band eventfully bring their emotion and craft to the reflection; the song catching fire with pop punk catchiness caught in an emotion soaked blaze.

It is a fine end to an ear pleasing first delving into the Reckless Intentions adventure, the first of many more highly pleasurable unions if they build on the undoubted potential and fun of Lights.

The Lights EP is out now across most online stores.

http://www.recklessintentions.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/recklessintentionsuk/    https://twitter.com/recklessband_uk

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Stripped down and bouncing: venturing into the lively world of Cinders

Exploding on the Salt Lake City music scene in 2015, Cinders has been a bundle of great sounds and fun luring fresh waves of new fans year by year, song by song. Their diverse indie-pop/alternative rock sound has been acclaimed by those fans as “rowdy acoustic pop”, a tag which perfectly fits their releases to date and a live presence which leaves a venue smiling breathlessly. We took the chance to find out more about the sextet with both hands, chatting with the band about beginnings, music, the lure of their live shows and plenty more…

Hello all and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Chelsey: Well- we have Adrian our ’emo punk’ that studies jazz, Jordan ‘the one who never grew up’, Montana our ‘spikeball extraordinaire’, Austin ‘the one with the dad jokes’, Brad ‘the sex appeal’ and me…. band mom. We are just a bunch of geeks that like music.

I would say the vision of Cinders came from Montana and Jordan. As to how we all came together, some members of the band are long time high school friends, work friends, others met later in life while living in Tennessee, and even social media has played a large part in the formation of Cinders.

Have you all been involved in other bands before? If so how has that possibly shaped what you are doing now?

Austin: Everyone has had experience in bands prior to Cinders, even if that experience was jazz band, wind symphony, or marching band… Jordan, Montana, Adrian, and Brad all played in “cool” high school bands. Adrian and Chelsey both studied jazz in college so between the 6 of us we have a lot of experience in many different styles of music.”

What inspired the band name?

Montana: It was the title of a terrible song we wrote in high school, and we thought the name was super cool and deserved more than just that terrible song. It was also the very first song Jordan and Montana ever played together about 7 years ago.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Jordan: None of us have really ever had a backup plan in life ha-ha. We found what we wanted to do and we are going after it! Music is everything to us and when you find 6 people who all have the same goal in mind, work just tends to get done. We are all pretty happy and positive people and think that the world could use a bit of a more hopeful sound. So although not all of our songs have the happiest lyrics, we try to keep in that hopeful tone to spread the feeling that everything will be okay and life is good.

And that still primarily drives the band or have they evolved over time?

Montana: I think we can all agree that of course the love for music drives us, but nothing drives as like crowd interaction at shows. Seeing them dance to the rhythms and hearing them scream the lyrics is the most rewarding feeling on earth.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved and has it been more of an organic movement or more the band deliberately trying new things?

Jordan: The band started off a bit more calm and chill until we performed live. We would be jumping, screaming, and stomping on stage to acoustic songs sans drums and it was awesome! It helped us realize more that people want to see a show and they want to see a band loving what they do for a living. I think we have all been to those shows where the band looks sad and stands still the whole time. After the show is over I’ll sometimes hear them saying “that was the funnest night of my life.” you can do those same things at a funeral (though at the end of the day they probably wouldn’t say it was the funnest day ever). We wanted to start creating music that fit our live performance better, so we did, and we still are. We want to whole heartedly say each night “This was the funnest night of our life.” Our fans come to have a great night, so that is what we work to give them.

You touched on it earlier, across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approaches and ideas to creating and playing music?

Jordan: We definitely come from very different musical backgrounds, but that is something we root ourselves in and take pride in. Music is not one sound or genre so we don’t want to be that either. We want to sound like who each of us are. Every Cinders song is like a cake. The cake isn’t all good, big and pretty until all the ingredients and frosting are added. We are each an important ingredient (Chelsey and Austin are the couple on top of the cake). So I guess the inspiration comes from trying to see outside of the box. Yes it has definitely helped us to look at music in a more open way!

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Brad: So the songs at the beginning generally come from Jordan’s or Montana’s mind. With a few ideas, a riff, or some lyrics. Once we get something tangible to work with, I’ll usually record some drums for them. And then bit by bit we each add ideas and mess with it. Montana works his pro-tools magic and next thing you know we’ve got a solid demo, or a song.

Where do the prime inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs come from?

Jordan: Personal experience, words with friends, rhyming dictionaries, childhood books ha-ha. It comes from everywhere. I feel like all of us writers have very strange minds. They are like caves full of thoughts waiting to come out, it is just a matter of searching hard enough to find them. That search can be very tough but super fulfilling.

Would you give us some background to your latest release and some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

Brad: Our latest release is our acoustics vol. 1. We love to rock out, but we also love the chill feel of stripping everything away and revealing the songs as they are by themselves. We call it vol. 1 because we plan on doing an acoustic vol. 2 of course. Not for a while though! 😉

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Adrian: For our first record we had the mentality of the final state is what we were recording. And then we would only slightly modify what we had. But that has definitely changed. We are now working on demos and having a group production phase to our songs.

Tell us more about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band and as many bands will attest to, it is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield, how have you found it your neck of the woods?

Adrian: Our fans are definitely our favorite part. We wouldn’t be a band if it wasn’t for them. And as for the opportunities out here in Utah they are great. Utah has a great sense of community in live and local music.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Jordan: Social media is awesome! It has created a way for artists and fans to communicate and connect in ways they never could have 20 years ago. We really owe it all to our friends and fans who have shared our music all over social media to help us get to where we are! Wherever our fans are, we want to be there as well. So we have loved being able to keep them updated with photos and videos of each show. We have even started a Patreon so that they can be a part of the writing of our new album! The music industry is changing and I think social media is a huge part of it and I think it is very positive.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks again for having us, we really appreciate it. To those reading, we love you and are so grateful for all of the support you have shown us! Thank you for everything and look forward to #album2 coming soon!

Check out more about and from Cinders @ https://www.facebook.com/cindersmusic/ and http://www.cindersmusic.com/

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Katalina Kicks – Cold / I Want The World

There are some bands which simply kick ass, some that try and miss, but just a few who grab it first, give an over familiar squeeze, and then give it a firm boot with their sound. Katalina Kicks has persistently been in the camp of the latter over the years and definitely stake their place with their new double A-sided single. Taken from their acclaim gathering new album Vices, the twin attack of Cold / I Want The World is a mix as aggressive as it is seductive, as agitated as it is thoughtful, and across both tracks relentlessly magnetic.

Consisting of band founding original of 2010 in vocalist/guitarist Ian George with bassist Nadia Silverstone and drummer Jase Wilkinson alongside, Katalina Kicks have just come off a successful 20-date UK and European tour in support of Vices and have prepared a summer of matching busyness and attention with their new single.

Two distinctly different styles of sound and imagination, Cold swiftly and firmly steals the show with its irritable ingenuity. Featuring grime artist GT Solo, the track instantly has ears enticed with dirty riffs and punchy beats, their punky nature an instinctive arousal of our personal appetites for attitude driven dirty rock ‘n’ roll. It is a spiky mix swiftly reinforced by the militant vocal expression of George backed by the spatial sheen of Silverstone’s melodic tones. Taking a biting swipe at the British Conservative government and their austerity cuts, the song is a belligerently potent incitement in word and sound embracing a new voice in the shape of the self-penned words and vocal dexterity of South London lyricist GT Solo. Quite simply irresistible stuff, the track is punk rock raising a middle finger at the establishment with craft and a lingering rock ‘n’ roll snarl.

I Want the World is a much calmer proposal though with its own underlining bite as melodic and classic rock merge in a clean cut but still enjoyably dusty roar. The clang and melodic prowess of the guitar is courted by the moody yet infectious shuffle of the bass, Wilkinson’s beats swinging with forceful intent across their catchy union. Maybe less striking at first compared to its team mate, the song only grows to increasingly tempt and persuade with every eager listen.

The single makes for a highly eventful and resourceful doorway into the diverse sound of Katalina Kicks, a potent glimpse of their bold escapades. Whether it is their finest moment, we cannot say not having heard all their adventures but it and especially Cold is one of the best moments, song wise, to be heard this year.

July 21st sees the release of Cold/I Want the World.

http://www.katalinakicks.com/    https://www.facebook.com/katalinakicks    https://twitter.com/katalinakicks

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright