Amycanbe – Wolf

If like us you missed it at the time of release, Wolf is the latest album from Italian outfit Amycanbe which is well worth taking time out to go explore.  Creating a magnetic blend of electronic/indie pop and shoegaze/trip hop, the Cervia hailing quartet mesmerise the senses and imagination with their third full-length, its music a potent seduction led by the temptress tones of vocalist Francesca Amati.

Formed in 2002 by drummer/keyboardist Marco Trinchillo and guitarist/bassist/keyboardist Mattia Mercuriali, Amycanbe became a quartet three years later with the addition of Amati and Paolo Gradari. The years since has seen the release of debut album, Being A Grown-Up Sure Is Complicated in 2007, its successor Mountain Whales in 2011, and Wolf two years ago with keyboardist and album producer Mattia Dallara now alongside Amati, Mercuriali, and Trinchillo.

Swiftly it is easy to understand why Wolf was well-received upon its release, the album from opener Grano a truly magnetic affair with moments which spark a rapturous response in a continual appetite for its sounds and presence. The first track smoulders on the ears straight away, keys and the harmonious lure of Amati a spatial kiss as electronic shooting stars fly. Hitting its optimistic stride, the song radiates warmth and temptation, slowly rising from its enticing slumber as an increasing energy infects its passing minutes though enjoyably it never catches truly aflame at any point instead continuing to tease and seduce with Amati heading the affair.

The following I Pay brings a familiar if undefined air to its craft and character; warmly hugging like an old friend with fresh revelations to share. As in the first, country rock seeded melodies entice and similarly bred breezes blow across its landscape, a bounty of imagination which increasingly evolves with unpredictable hues and twists before the more sinewy rock attributes of Where From cluster around the ever enthralling presence of Amati. With keys aligning darker groans alongside melody rich sighs under a web of guitar nurtured suggestion, the song grips attention even if not quite finding the ultimate sparks of its predecessors.

Fighting opens up with the minimalistic charm of Young Marble Giants before blossoming into a rousing yet still nicely reserved proposal with an eighties new wave air wrapped around the inspiring rise of keys bred strings. A track which grows to its glory over numerous pleasing listens rather than making an instant impact, it soon has the imagination aflame while 5 Is The Number easily captivates with a cosmopolitan yet intimate sway as great drama infests its bass and a matching adventure in its overall invention. As pleasing and striking as both are, they are eclipsed by Wolves and its creative theatre which has a touch of The Cellophane Flowers to it.

Through the deep pulse and electronic hum of the imaginatively eventful White Slide and the subsequent subtle melodrama of Bring Back The Grace, band and album simply hold ears like warm sirens while Febbraio smoulders in the same with a jazzy grace and salubrious flirtation as a slumberous atmosphere wraps wintery arms around the senses. Each leave pleasure in their vibrant wake before Queens steals best track honours with its glorious croon and an increasing roar reminding of bands such as Belly and Throwing Muses. The track is superb and only gets more potent over time to seal its status within the album.

Closing with the sultry instrumental of Orata and its swimming melodies within surf/psych rock shimmers, Wolf captivates with growing strength and tenacity as new depths are revealed with subsequent listens. It is not a brand new album but one those who love to be seduced by their music should seriously think about slipping into.

Wolf can be streamed and bought @ https://amycanbe1.bandcamp.com/album/wolf while you can check out our interview with Francesca Amati @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/03/28/the-lure-of-the-moon-and-serenades-exploring-amycanbe-with-vocalist-francesca-amati/

http://amycanbe.it/    https://www.facebook.com/Amycanbe/

Pete RingMaster 04/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Basementones – No ease, No rest, No mercy

There is a great nagging quality to the sound of Finnish punk ‘n’’ rollers Basementones and in fine insistence within their new EP No ease, No rest, No mercy. Easily tempting ears on its first couple of listens, the release leaves the seeds of addictiveness behind; lures which spark that just one more time repetition which in turn leads to another and more obsessive qualities.

Released on Undead Artists, the EP comes four years after the release of the band’s debut album Let There Be Noise which followed their first EP Gambler of 2012. Being introduced to the band through No ease, No rest, No mercy, with thanks to a certain Johnny Rose (Thirteen Shots), founder of said label, what the band has been up to between releases we cannot say though plenty of shows seems a good guess, that and, with hindsight, the more audible honing of a sound which instinctively gets under the skin with its mix of punk rock, psychobilly, and numerous other aspects of rock ‘n’ roll.

The quartet gets down to business straight away with opener The Call, hooks and swinging rhythms instantly colluding as vocalist Jani snarls and growls in his distinctive way. The melodic dexterity of Kinnunen matches the lure of his grooves and lively hooks whilst the string slapping prowess of double bassist Tuukka needs little time to stoke instinctive ardour for throbbing suggestive basslines. Punk and rock ‘n’ roll unite in the voracious swing of the track, Lahu’s lively beats fuelling it all with tenacious energy and urgency as the EP gets off to a flying start.

And there is no time to grab a breath as the outstanding Green Bastards steps in with a spicy groove which within another second launches virulent hooks and a pulsating flirtatious bassline from within its salacious temptation. With Jani adding his raw catchiness to the contagion, the track is pure infection and the best track on offer though closely courted by the likes of the rockabilly swinging Cellmates Of Lunacy. There is a touch of The Peacocks to the track but it is soon bound in the Basementones’ character of sound and expression as other spices adds to an increasingly compelling tapestry.

A country/cowpunk hue comes with the resourceful exploits of The House its creative rustling soon twisting things into an individual proposal which bounds along with zeal and infectious dexterity if not quite matching the heights of those before it or the outstanding antics of final track No Regrets. The psychobilly essences of the third song are even more vocal within the EP closer, their sultrily toxic hues merging with horrorpunk/punk escapades as the release is given a boisterous and increasingly rousing finale.

Given the sound and potent lure of No ease, No rest, No mercy it is surprising we have not come across Basementones before but better late than never.

No ease, No rest, No mercy is out now digitally and on red vinyl through Undead Artists @ https://basementones.bandcamp.com/ and https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/no-ease-no-rest-no-mercy

https://www.facebook.com/Basementones/

Pete RingMaster 04/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright