Nasher – 432-1: Open The Vein

Taking the listener in a melodic hug whilst opening windows and spotlights upon lives, intimate and more politically social, the new album from Nasher is nothing less than captivation. 432-1: Open The Vein shares memories and reflections like the sun provides warmth and clarity through songs as compelling in their writing as in the melodies and harmonies bringing them to life. It is blessed with truly bewitching and memorable moments within a body which from start to finish has ears hungry for more as the imagination weaves away.

Nasher is Brian Nash, the guitarist for Frankie Goes to Hollywood. Before his part in their success, he had already linked up with drummer Peter Gill and vocalist Holly Johnson in Sons and Egypt, forming the outfit with the duo after playing in several other bands with varying styles. Sons and Egypt came to an end in 1980 when his colleagues left to join a new band in the shape of Frankie Goes to Hollywood. The departure of Gerard O’Toole from that band two years later saw Nash link up with his former band mates again, the band going on to have international triumphs of course with the likes of Relax and Two Tribes. After their demise in 1987 Nash collaborated with singer Grant Boult as Low and later again in Dr. Jolly’s Salvation Circus. Two solo albums in Ripe and Le Grande Fromage appeared in 1999 and 2002 respectively, Nash also creating his own Internet-based label, Babylon Pink, around that time upon which 432-1: Open The Vein now appears.

It opens up with Salt in Our Veins and the sound of water falling and lapping from presumably the Mersey of his hometown as its specific noises raise their heads. From within their evocative textures, Nash’s acoustic guitar strokes the senses, his following vocals similarly coaxing attention with their harmonic warmth. The emotional suggestion and plaintive insight of his words are just as magnetic, Nash seemingly sharing light on his move to the capitol and the retaining by Liverpool of his heart. The wonderful song is a sign of things to come, of the drama lining every note and syllable, of the infectiousness fuelling every ballad and livelier engagement with ears and thoughts.

The fine start continues through the folkish stroll of Still Can’t Find the One, a song embracing eighties pop hues more akin to the likes of Blancmange and Heaven 17 than his Frankie exploits, and the observational melancholic theatre of I Spy. Not for the last time upon the album, there is something of XTC to the songwriting or more the Colin Moulding side of the band, the song a pastoral reflection in sound and insight in word of modern life. Both tracks are instinctive magnetism, warm yet shadowy caresses matched in strength and beguilement by the sunny disposition and emotional sentiment of Whole.

Through the harmonic questioning of one of the bitter protagonists of today in Katies and the boisterous rock ‘n’ roll of Prostitutes and Cocaine, the album only adds to its riveting and skilled pleasuring of ears while Just Sounds Like Noise engagingly repeats words that people of a certain age share about Saturday afternoon and evening TV. It was better in our day is a staple claim of every generation and forever will be though not always with the charm given it by Nash.

The mellow hazed Pebbles to Dust seduces next; the increasingly bewitching song almost somnambulistic in gait and air as it melancholically smooches with the senses. Its darkly lit atmosphere flows into the equally sombre glide of Where Will the Kids Live? through the lively antics of youth. The track is gorgeous, once more drama seeping into every melodic sparkle and haunted glaze of sound and emotive shadow.

Both Nothing Homes and XO simply captivate; melodies and harmonic sighs to the fore with the second of the two slipping into an animated skip for its pop catchy incitement of feet and emotions. With a whiff of Pete Wylie to its contagious enterprise, the track has the listener physically and emotionally bouncing before Yesterday’s News closes things up with its Jam lit croon. More of a grower compare to the instant persuasion of earlier tracks, it emerges as a just as momentous and stirring proposition within 432-1: Open The Vein, an album which leaves the heart even more lustfully in love with music, especially if you hang on for its hidden Bowie inspired finale.

 432-1: Open The Vein is out now through Babylon Pink Recordings.

https://www.facebook.com/Nasher-105270312871476/

Pete RingMaster 05/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Scout Killers – Deception

Being a band we have had a close ear on for a handful of years now, we can suggest that the Scout Killers sound has now all grown up as it fuels one sizeable treat in the shape of their new EP. Deception offers four tracks of infectious alternative rock with a snarl in their heart and imagination in their nature. It is easily the UK quintet’s most striking and accomplished proposal yet and the moment far bigger spotlights could wake up to their presence.

Previous single Rip Me Apart hinted at a coming of age of their sound last year but now is shown to have been just another step in the growth bursting out within Deception. Since emerging in 2009, Scout Killers has become an established and eagerly supported presence within the British underground scene. Nudging attention with their debut EP We Cage The Storm and making a stronger impact with their self-titled first album, the Bath based outfit has increasingly blossomed in creativity and reputation as a live proposition, sharing stages with the likes of Fearless Vampire Killers, The Computers, F.O.E.S, and No Devotion among many, and through further releases like the Stand Your Ground EP of 2014 and the previously mentioned impressive single.

Deception takes things to a whole new ball park on all levels, the release quickly gripping ears and stirring the imagination with opener Freak Show. A lone guitar melody winds itself around ears first, soon being joined by the rousing tones of vocalist Scott Cox and the imposing yet inviting beats of Chris Phillips. There is instant muscle in the rising sound of the song, tension in its vocal and sonic drama, all bound in an infectiousness which fuels the attack of the forceful web of sound. The dark hues of Tom Graham-Hibbs’ bass are a throbbing grounding to the fiery textures cast by guitarists Beau Stevens and Julien Morrez, the union of the five a theatre of craft and imagination.

The seriously impressing start is followed by the mellower air of Keep Telling Me Lies though it too has a tempestuous edge with gives bite to its riffs and emotion. Bouncy rhythms temper the melancholic hue of melodies, bass and vocals bringing their individual shadows to the plaintive voice of the song. A Pearl Jam meets Alter Bridge washes over ears though as its predecessor, the track emerges as something distinct to Scout Killers, an individuality which has also come alive more dramatically with the EP.

Let It All Go hits the plateau of the opener, melodies and rhythms coming together for a suggestive start which soon becomes a more imposing proposal as Cox’s vocals once more grip attention with some superb backing from others within the band. A slice of meaty rock ‘n’ roll with a controlled attack which adds to its weight, the song truly hits the spot before You Have It All brings things to an equally heady conclusion. The final track flirts with ears initially, a guitar teasing and coaxing before being quickly joined by the rapier swings of Phillips and the growling bait of Graham-Hibbs’ bass. As catchy as it is an intensive roar, the song twists and turns with a resourceful fluidity and craft, leaving on a senses scorching stomp of a finale which demands a swift dive back into the EP’s depths.

Like many others, we have has a soft spot for Scout Killers though after Deception it has just become a touch lustier, the EP a wake-up call for national attention and beyond.

The Deception EP is out across most online stores July 7th

http://www.scoutkillers.com/    https://www.facebook.com/scoutkillers/    https://twitter.com/scoutkillers

Pete RingMaster 05/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Theia – Back In Line

There are few guarantees in music but one thing you can be sure of is having a good time with anything from UK rockers Theia, a theory proven yet again with the band’s new album Back In Line. It is not just another rousing outing with the Burton upon Trent trio though; everything about it is bigger and bolder than anything from the band, and bursting to unleash nothing less than prime meat rock ‘n’ roll.

Since emerging in 2012, Theia has laid a boisterous hand and infectious imagination on hard rock through a rousing live presence and some attention grabbing, pleasure raising releases. The success of their first two potential loaded EPs in 2013, Theia I and II, was clearly eclipsed by the potency and impact of debut album Take The Pill two years later. It was an encounter slamming the band on the national heavy rock map with a bang. Now broader horizons are in their sights with Back In Line, the album simply one of the most virulently infectious and robustly rousing encounters of recent times from a band openly raising their game on songwriting, craft, and anthemic prowess.

With drummer Jake Dalton linking up with band founders in lead vocalist/guitarist Kyle Lamley and bassist/vocalist Paul Edwards in 2016, Theia quickly reveal the new maturity and creative zeal in their music within the album’s first full track which follows the opening atmospheric intro of Keezheekoni. Scenic within a brooding southern air, its suggestive instrumental coaxes ears into the waiting jaws of My Poison. Instantly rhythms slam down their muscular intent as a Billy Talent spiced riff taunts an already keen imagination. The snarling tone of Edwards’ bass is a stirring predator within the growing hard rock blaze of the track, always there adding a threat as Lamley’s guitars lays down fiery melodic flames and vocals lead a just as swiftly imposed catchiness where familiar and fresh hues unite within a resourceful roar.

Next up Whiskey Business is a barroom romp shaped by melodic liquor and jabbing beats as vocals add their own boisterous antics. There is a touch of Extreme to the song especially in its funkier groove woven moments, virulent turns far too easy to get involved with to avoid addiction before the album’s title track prowls with an eager swagger through ears. Riffs and rhythms stalk with a contagious smile to their trespass, Lamley’s melodic vocals just as inviting as the tenacious smoulder of the Black Spiders scented song sears and seduces the senses with increasing dexterity and rigour.

The outstanding Just Go has a calmer air initially, its eighties hued climate still punched through by hungry rhythms before the fire in the song’s belly inflames subsequent melodies, wiry grooves, and the whiff of pop punk which colludes with the song’s hard rock breeding. Carrying another irresistible, incendiary chorus, the track hits the spot with relish while its successor Signed Sealed Cemented brings a similar template of sound before creating its own southern tainted rock ‘n’ roll fuelled proposal.

The swinging exploits of following Paper The House has the body back on its feet, though it never has a moment to sit across Back In Line up to this point to be honest; the track brewing up another instinctively infectious captivation with lithe grooves, throbbing veins, and invention moulded twists with inescapable temptation. The song is superb, a dirty little temptress no man, woman, or hound could resist.

The melodic croon of Sparkplug comes next, its acoustic stroking of the senses the canvas for Lamley’s impressing vocals and the tease of drama sharing strings. Sharing the band’s inspirations in artists such as Guns N’ Roses and Buckcherry, the track easily captures the imagination, only blossoming into greater persuasion with every passing minute before the acoustic balladry of Home hugs ears. Though missing the richer inventive sparks of its predecessor, the song simply enthrals, growing more essential with every listen.

Sharing a more intensive and stormier evolution of the climate in the album’s intro, Afterglow emotionally and in tone murmurs and groans before hitting its irritable rock ‘n’ roll stride where again sinewy grooves, rapacious riffs, and lead loaded rhythms demand attention; all coming with another tide of infectiousness which, as vocals anthemically entice, tempers their volatility superbly.

It is a fine end to a release impossible to ignore, get out of the head, and to find any restraint in heartily enthusing about. It is fair to say that rock ‘n roll is safe in the hands of bands like Theia and relishing the adventure certainly Back In Line offers.

Back In Line is out now through WDFD Records.

Upcoming shows:

15th July – Uttoxeter Rocks, Uttoxeter

21st July – Collop Gate Farm, Rochdale

22nd July – BurtonFest, Burton Upon Trent (afternoon)

22nd July – Sempiternal Warm-up, Cannock (evening)

26th August – Rockwich Unplugged, Northwich

27th August – Giff-fest, Wolverhampton

2nd September – B2, Norwich

3rd September – The Black Heart, London

8th September – The Hut, Corby

9th September – The Station, Cannock

http://theiauk.com/    https://www.facebook.com/THEIAofficial/    https://twitter.com/theia_uk/

Pete RingMaster 05/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright