The Parallax Method – The Squid

A couple of months or so short of two years after the release of The Owl EP, British instrumental progressive rock trio The Parallax Method release its companion piece, The Squid. Continuing the theme of “space and a perpetual battle between the owl and the squid to convey their unique sub-genre of modern prog” started with the first EP, its successor takes ears on another groove infested, colourfully inventive, and technically captivating shuffle sure to have the body enthralled and twisted as eagerly as the imagination.

Emerging from the ashes of hard rock band Isolysis, The Parallax Method stepped forward in 2014 with old friends in guitarist Danny Beardsley, drummer Dave Wright, and bassist Daniel Hayes. Drawing on the inspiration of bands such as Between The Buried And Me, Tesseract, and Karnivool, they nurtured and bred the compelling tapestry of sound to grace debut EP The Owl in 2015. Its acclaimed release and complex yet easily accessible escapade announced The Parallax Method as an exciting prospect to watch and an adventure to devour. The departure of Hayes post the recording of the EP saw Ben Edis (Spirytus/Breed77) come in and complete a line-up even creatively bolder and mischievous within The Squid.

Let’s Get Kraken gets things underway; its title the first hint to the knavish and spirited escapade within song and EP. From within a busily engaged crowd, a swing guided bassline joins the jazzy flirtation of guitar, beats skipping along with them. It is an inviting collusion soon luring hips and feet into the waiting net of enterprise; every initial attribute and lure soon infested with lustful intensity and creative boisterousness as things get funky with the arrival of Donald Sutherland And His Magnificent Mane. Evolving from its predecessor, grooves captivate as hooks ensnare, all the while Wright’s swings landing with real bite and snap as the track gets down to laying a web of intrigue and beguilingly evolving adventure. There is chunkiness to its body which sparks the appetite as much as its gentler wanderings across the senses, all making for a compelling incitement for body and imagination.

Its final vocal sigh sparks the similarly spirited and energetic shuffle of You Gotta Be Squiddin’ Me’, the track slyly entwining ears with seductive grooves with a whiff of predacious devilment as around them melodic interplay blossoms its own beguiling enticements. Electronic spicing only adds to the tenacious and imaginative touch of song and guitar, Beardsley weaving another rascality of sound through his strings as Edis’ bass prowls with its own coltish instincts and intent. Fuelled by mood swings of enterprise, the track at times heavy and rapacious whilst in other moments crafty and sprightly, it has body and thoughts leaping and inventing respectively.

As too does the creatively athletic and kinetically energetic canter of Owl Pacino Vs Mega Mango; a piece of music which can feel in certain moments like a stand-off between battling textures and attitudes but at other times a heated yet respectful collusion of both sides; though it is the aggressive instincts of each side which drive the outstanding track.

Its funk lined finale flows into the epic melodic epilogue and dynamically entrancing theatre of I Squid You Farewell (Owl Be Seeing You). The final track is a drama of sound and texture; an imagination woven and guided frolic of the rich craft and strikingly inventive versatility of all three musicians as they lead the listener on a fruitful gest as much of their own as the band’s making.

Every listen of The Squid brings escalating joy and adventure as new twists in the imagination flare up as fresh nuances and layers are discovered. The EP is a stunning move on from The Owl yet still works perfectly with its earlier companion; the full glory of The Parallax Method ingenuity and creative fertility best served with both releases played back to back and given full attention of ears and mind.

The Squid is out now digitally and on CD @ http://theparallaxmethod.bigcartel.com/

http://www.theparallaxmethod.com/  https://www.facebook.com/theparallaxmethod   https://twitter.com/parallaxmethod

Pete RingMaster 16/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Carnival Club – Magdalena’s Cape

Woven from the threads of numerous flavours which alone instinctively grab attention, the Carnival Club sound is a tapestry which certainly on the UK rocker’s debut EP, Magdalena’s Cape, blossoms from a rich first temptation to a lustfully devoured introduction thereon in. It is an infestation of the imagination nurtured in the creative mystique of prog rock, the hearty emotion of blues rock, the bold roar of sixties punk, and the hazy climate of psych rock. In truth, it is all that and more in a proposal and release which is as fresh and striking as it is the return of familiar sonic strains; an EP which offers the potential of a new essential force from within the ever pregnant Manchester music scene.

Emerging April 2016, the quartet of Eddie Moxon, George Peel, Joe Lodge, and Kai Jon Roberts quickly made a potent impression on the local scene. Now national awareness is being readied and stirred by the outfit’s maiden EP, its mature presence and rich web of sound belying the youth of its creators whilst consuming ears in an adventure bordering on the essential.

Opener House of Cards instantly entwines ears in one spicy groove, its psych blues tang soon aligned to the heavy throb of bass and crisply landing beats. Vocals make for just as potent bait as the song almost crawls into view before settling into a boisterous rock ‘n’ roll shuffle. With every groove and melodic tendril seemingly becoming thicker and richer in psychedelic/hard rock tenacity as impressive vocals equally grow in energy and presence, the EP quickly becomes a captivating proposal only increasing its grip as Mistakes Troubles and Kisses takes over.

The second track has a lighter touch compared to the heavy presence of its predecessor but an infectious swing built on pure rock muscle and emotive intensity. Its pop rock temptation is as much modern indie as it is seventies heavy rock, another fusion already revealing the kaleidoscopic canvas of the Carnival Club songwriting and sound. Its inescapably catchy body and unpredictable but fluid twists only seduce, passing on a willing submission to its bold charms to the following You’re So Hostile. It is a track even more virulently infectious with its eighties pop hooks and brooding rhythmic seducing which within seconds has the body bouncing and hips swerving with its flirtatiously weighty stroll while roaming the psyche like a blend of The Cult, My Baby, and The Doors; essences of Hendrix and goth rock only adding to its best track grabbing magnificence.

The EP’s title track steps forward next, Magdalena’s Cape a mellow caress wrapped in psychedelic wooziness and prog rock musing but with a tart spicing to its melodic  tempting, kind of like a distantly related fusion of The Jesus and Mary Chain and The Electric Prunes to try and give an impression of its sultry beauty.

Another mighty moment comes with the EP’s closing track, Headache a web of crunchy riffs and imposing textures around prowling vocals and stalking rhythms complete with sixties bred punk rapacity. Those stabbing riffs alone ignite the passions, the scythes of guitar and predacious grooves of bass escalating the primal attraction as the ever magnetic vocals seal the devilish deal on offer between song and listener.

It is a masterful and irresistible end to a just as successful release, one still carrying the potential of bigger, bolder, and greater successes ahead for Carnival Club. Magdalena’s Cape is the declaration of something mouth-watering and truly exciting breaking out within the northern music scene. With more of the same, national attention is surely guaranteed and with the realisation of the raw promise within, watch out world.

Magdalena’s Cape is out now through Demolition Diner Records as a digital download, on CD with an additional Ltd Gatefold CD version, and on Ltd Vinyl @ https://carnivalclub.bandcamp.com/track/magdalenas-cape

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Pete RingMaster 16/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mosley Bar – Royalties

Following up their well-received debut EP, Another Record Sleeve, which sparked strong attention the way of the band and airplay from the likes of BBC 6 Music BBC Introducing, Mosley Bar uncage successor Royalities this month to show that the potency of the first was no flash in the pan. Offering four tracks with a fine line in instinctive catchiness and enterprise, the EP reinforces the British North West hailing quartet’s potential of making a real impression on the UK rock scene.

Formed in 2015, Mosley Bar draw on the inspiration of bands such as Arctic Monkeys, The Libertines, Catfish and the Bottlemen, Two Door Cinema Club, and Circa Waves in a sound which has a certain familiarity to it but equally a freshness of youth and imagination. Certainly the first pair of artists in that selection of influences comes to mind easily with the band’s sound but infests without disguising the potential of bolder adventures ahead; a promise which is richer and already more imaginative in their new offering against the strong showing within Another Record Sleeve.

Royalties opens up with a song which has already lured praise carrying attention, Two Apart quickly enticing ears with its initial guitar jangle around the distinctive tones of vocalist/guitarist Ryan Ward. In no time, the swinging lure of Tim Williams’s bass and the melodic enticement of guitarist Adam Eccleston add to the song’s blossoming, the lively beats of Matthew Wright driving things with spirit. It is easy to see why the infectious exploits and dynamic prowess of the track has drawn keen plaudits, its boisterous exploits and web of melodic and sonic enterprise an accomplished and riveting proposal lined by that enjoyable Arctic Monkeys spicing.

With increasing drama and emotive intensity roaring through ears, the excellent opener makes way for the similarly instinctively catchy Wide Awake. Its own line in hooks and flirtatious industry is even swifter in persuasion than that of its virulent predecessor, Eccleston and Wards’ guitars infesting feet and hips as the latter continues to bring his magnetic voice to the rousing mix. For us, the track simply outshines the first and pretty much anything from the band to date; its body boisterous and character a fine blend of recognisable and new essences colluding in one irresistible incitement.

The punchy stroll of next up Philip is aligned to a melodic shimmer and psych pop flavouring, contrasting textures which unite with evocative imagination around the hearty stomp of a song erupting with persuasive zeal. It is another frisky and buoyant landscape of sound which grows listen by listen into a rousing temptation; a growing temptation also emulated in Chasing which brings things to a fine close. The slow burner of the bunch, though its breezy energy and playful nature is a quick success on ears and appetite, the song simmers and shines with increasing potency to provide another highly enjoyable outing with Mosley Bar.

Listening to Royalities, it feels like now is the time for Mosley Bar to add bolder, more unpredictable elements to their music. Their new release does have a whiff of that evolution to be fair and added to the band’s natural weaving of infectious music around insightful words, there is no reason that the journey ahead for band and fan will not be eventful and thoroughly enjoyable.

Royalties is out now across  most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/mosleybar/    https://twitter.com/mosley_bar

Pete RingMaster 16/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright