Ghouls – RUN

Though it is hard to exactly pin down the precise reason, it is very easy to find a connection with the music of UK outfit Ghouls. Whether it is the fusion of familiar essences with something fresh and individual, the lyrical themes drawn from being on the outside of the assumed norm, or the refusal to be pigeonholed in life and style, probably all three, the London based sextet make for an instinctive pleasure in ears and imagination.

The release of new album RUN epitomises that union; a dozen tracks bred in a fusion of pop and core punk, alternative rock, and numerous other flavours which has the body dancing, ears pleasured, and spirit defiant. The successor to debut album Ten Thousand Words On released a year after the band’s emergence in 2013, RUN is a band relaxed in its musical skin and bold in its creative ambition. Since their first album, a release striking the spark for the band to sell-out The Monarch in Camden and earn the continuing praise of Frank Turner, Ghouls have become a potent lure on the UK and European live scene and at festivals such as 2000Trees, Jera On Air, The Secret Garden Party, Mighty Sounds, Hit The Deck and many more. Last year alone saw them undertake a two week tour of the USA, play THE FEST in Gainesville, Florida, and successfully light up Brixton Academy as part of the Fireball Fuelling The Fire Tour.

Now it is RUN ready to push the band and its reputation on again and does a fine job of both from its very first moments courtesy of opener Seasonal Affective. Infectious from its first breath with strolling riffs and keen beats, the track soon blossoms again with fuzzy squirts of guitar and the potent voice of guitarist Benedict Goold. With emotion and energetic expression in his strong delivery, his presence makes an early focal point backed by heated melodies and the swinging jabs of drummer Jay Swinstead. The track never erupts as it suggests it might but rather lets its lining of grumbling shadows led by Sam Mussell’s growling bass add rich intrigue as hooks and catchy exploits engage.

It is a great start to the album which Autophobia continues with its fiery bounce. Quickly revealing the inviting flames of Ben Maz’s sax and Russell Spencer’s trombone, the song rumbles along with a pop punk eagerness. Like a mix of The Hostiles and Neck Deep, it grabs ears and appetite with ease though it is still eclipsed by the rousing revelry of Better Places straight after. With an initial blast of brass stirring the spirit, the encounter soon reveals a great landscape of instinctively catchy bait whether the song relaxes into a thoughtful calm or leaps to its toes and grabs hips and feet in a tenacious bounce. That earlier mentioned familiarity is already open across the three songs and like an old inspiring friend within the third before helping fuel the contagion of next up Facebook Friend. With a hip hop lilt to his delivery, Goold acts like a ringmaster to the confident mischief and subsequent boisterous swagger and aggression of the outstanding song.

The pair of Salt with its sultry brass infusions and rhythmic rumble especially alluring and The Difference through its impassioned heart keeps things bubbling nicely even if neither quite scales the heights of those before them for personal tastes. The first of the two though is as memorable as anything upon RUN and equalled in that attribute by the reflective voice and tenacious canter of Home. Another proposition drawing on the “daily grind of real life and the struggles faced in the modern day” for its spark, it has the body a lively blur in no time.

Antagonist has funkiness in its swing as it forges another moment within the album firmly sticking in thoughts; its body a tapestry of controlled and volatile enterprise which never leaves a dull moment before Hard Days captivates with its lively croon and infectious pop fuelled romp and in turn Disavowal prowls and catches alight with emotive intensity. More of a slow burner than other tracks around it, it similarly grows into one of the hearty episodes returning at will in the imagination.

Completed by firstly the acoustic caress of voice and guitar of Expect Greater Things, a song which just grabs the passions from the off, gripping even tighter as the track eventually ignites into a full fire of sound and infection and finally Oxytocin which closes things with melodic flaring in an excitably catchy escapade. The pair provides a fine end to a release which has enjoyment bubbling over from start to finish.

RUN carries the potential of even greater adventures ahead with Ghouls where an appetite for the bite which this album hints at but never quite delivers may be satisfied. The album though ticks all the right boxes for forty odd minutes of rich pleasure and physical animation, its new maturity in songwriting and sound declaring Ghouls ready for big attention.

RUN is available now through 1471 Records @ https://www.1471records.com/store and https://ghoulsuk.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ghoulsuk   https://twitter.com/GhoulsUK   https://www.instagram.com/ghoulsuk/

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cavaverman – Women, Monsters & Cazzottis

After the acclaim lured by their album Tales From Cavafistool around Europe, Italian horror punks Cavaverman release their new EP, Women, Monsters & Cazzottis. Offering three tracks as a name your own price download, their latest encounter is equally as irresistible with the band stretching their sound to embrace an even richer array of flavours in its rock ‘n’ roll stomp. It builds on the last album with relish and enterprise with suggestive hints of where the band is going next.

Hailing from Monza, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Sal Champion, bassist Apocalypse Giò, and drummer Doktor Hell draw on the inspiration of bands such as The Ramones, Misfits, Alkaline Trio, and Entombed for their own enjoyably raw yet adventurous sound. A trio of albums in Dead Brains For Brain Dead, James Dead, and the aforementioned Tales From Cavafistool have more than marked Cavaverman out from the crowd and the Undead Artists released Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is no different.

It opens with Deadly Touch, a track featuring the potent vocals of Irene from Milan punks Viboras. The song itself is the punks inside Cavaverman coming to the fore; its horror punk ’n’ roll mixing with punk metal tendencies to unleash something akin to UK’s Trioxin Cherry meeting US bands Mongrel and Calabrese. From its first breath, the track stomps with attitude and an infectious lilt, the vocal union of Sal and Irene ear grabbing with the latter just as potent when tempting alone. Instinctive grooves and nagging hooks only add to the thick lure of the antagonism soaked song before Jamie Sommers steps forward.

The second song has a calmer persona, its psychobilly nurtured stroll and hearty croon showing a new maturity in the Cavaverman songwriting. Of course there is a snarl in the belly but one restrained as guitars weave their sultry serenade within a coarser tide of riffs and swinging rhythms. As the first, it is a richly magnetic affair captivating ears and imagination with swift ease before King of Cazzottis concludes the EP with its hard rock meets horror punk stomp. There is a healthy spice of pop punk to the chorus of the song too, another flavour in its bold mix needing little time to have body and vocal involvement from the listener on board.

Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is a band doing what they do best, unleashing instinctive rock ‘n’ roll whilst involving sound and creativity in new textures and explorations. There are surprises and plenty of familiar essences colluding in a slice of Cavaverman goodness which gets better and more tempting with every listen.

Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is out now through Undead Artists as a name your price download @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/women-monsters-cazzottis  or https://cavaverman.bandcamp.com/album/women-monsters-and-cazzottis

https://www.facebook.com/Cavaverman/

Pete RingMaster 09/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Rugby Road – III

There is nothing lively about its title but the new EP from US rock band Rugby Road, simply called III, more than makes up for that with its heartily tenacious sound. An encounter which like us you may have missed upon its release as 2016 closed its eyes; the four track encounter is an ear pleasing, skilfully offered slice of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll as bluesy and passionate as it is melodically captivating and instinctively boisterous.

Consisting of Kenny Kearns (vocals, keyboards, bass, guitar), Rich Pruett (drums, percussion, vocals), and Derek Smith (guitars, vocals), Philadelphia based Rugby Road began in 1990 drawing on inspirations found in the likes of Allman Brothers Band, Maceo Parker, Rusted Root, Bill Kreutzmann, Phish, Peter Frampton, and Dirty Dozen Brass Band. A regular in the late 90’s New York City Wetlands scene, the band has released a pair of albums, the 1998 unveiled Times Already Happened and three years later Different Degrees. More recently Kearns and the band have founded The Wayne Music Festival (now officially WXPN Welcomes The Wayne Music Festival) which since starting in 2015 has attracted more than 10,000 people each year to enjoy everything from country, bluegrass, jazz, pop, and rock from artists coming together from all over the country.

Recorded with producer Derek Chafin, III offers songs which according to Kearns “reflect what we’ve been working towards for years from a writing perspective.” It opens up with Back To You, a track which unmistakably has a rich feel of Bruce Springsteen to its rock ‘n’ roll but soon shows its own imaginative enterprise as suggestive melodies unite with the darker and denser rhythmic shadows of bass and Pruett’s crisp beats. Swiftly its magnetism is inescapable, the track a flame of craft and instinctive employment of influences and new endeavour, and just as quickly powerfully catchy. With a collection of vocals at times surrounding Kearns and the additional irresistible tones of a lady whose name has yet to be discovered, the song only escalates an attraction already sparked by the hazy weave cast by guitars.

The following Nobody (Needs To Know) is just as magnetic, it’s mellower but no less tenacious balladry carrying a soulful air and heart as blues kissed guitars spin a web of enticement around Kearns’ continually strong vocals. As with its predecessor, there is something quickly familiar to the song but only spicing adding to its appeal as its classic rock breeding grabs eager ears.

Spoken For unveils an even calmer canvas for its own emotive ballad next, though again it is a song with a blaze in its belly which from time to time urges more intensive expulsions of sound and energy. With the earthy tones of the bass almost growling alongside the contemplation of melody and voice, the song smoulders and slowly grows to rival those before it; eclipsing its immediate predecessor over time.

Bringing things to an enjoyable close is Give It Away, a country rock lined slice of rock which again has something of Springsteen about it as well as a Tom Petty-esque essence which does it no harm at all. For personal tastes, the song fails to match its companions but there is no denying its infectious ability to please as keenly tapping feet here can testify and it is fair to say that with every listen thoughts about the song only gain a more enamoured lilt.

Though it is annoying to say, we are new to Rugby Road but after having III sparking definite pleasure with its accomplished and refreshing presence, we can join the mass of others calling themselves fans of the band.

III is out now across most online stores.

http://rugbyroadband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/rugbyroadband

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright