Wax Futures – The Museum of Everything

Photo by Jonathan Dadds.

UK band Wax Futures to our mind has never fully fitted their post hardcore tag with their flavoursome sound but it has never been less applicable than with the bands new mini album The Museum of Everything. Boasting a virulent contagion of sound as indie, post punk, and new wave as it is math and punk rock, the release is a refreshing and inimitable slice of rock ‘n’ roll revelling in the new maturity and imagination fuelling the trio’s songwriting and music.

Formed in the final breaths of 2011, the Telford hailing band soon made their mark on the local live scene. With a growing support and reputation they released the Breadcrumbs EP in 2013, before tempting bigger attention with debut album A History of Things to Come; it like its successor a seven track offering with a more post hardcore heart to its enterprise. With their live presence taking in the UK, sharing stages with the likes of Limp Bizkit, Bear Makes Ninja, &U&I, Tall Ships, Alpha Male Tea Party, Castrovalva, Bad Grammar, The JCQ, and Idles along the way, the band have spent their time working on The Museum of Everything, evolving and pushing their creativity simultaneously. It was a concentrated effort now easily and swiftly heard in the album and greedily enjoyed twist by turn.

Recorded with Ryan Pinson (God Damn, Bad Grammar), produced and mastered by Tom Woodhead (ex-¡Forward, Russia!), The Museum of Everything gets down to infectious business straight away as a lone riff squirrels itself in ears, a lure soon joined by a vocal count and controlled swipes from Simon’s sticks. As they all enjoyably collude, Sandcastles in the Snow comes alive, a scuzzy hook reaching out as rhythms slip into a controlled canter while vocals further capture ears in tandem with the groove escaping Graham’s guitar. With the easy going meander of Kieran’s bass teasing feet, the song becomes busier, heading into an equally undemanding but inescapably catchy chorus. Never quite igniting but with a neat whiff of early Kaiser Chiefs to its subsequent enticement, the song is a compelling start to the album setting out an appetising canvas of invention soon taken to bigger and bolder heights.

Demographics is next and instantly with its opening melody alone, brings a Young Knives feel into play, one only accentuated by the vocals and the subsequent web of sonic intrigue and infectious collaboration across the threesome. Hooks grab attention throughout, littering the aural drama and flirtatious energy combining like a mix of At the Drive-In and Swound! but only creating its own distinct adventure. A constant nag on body and pleasure, the song makes way for the just as impressive (My Body is a) Landfill. Instantly, more boisterous in energy and just as enticing in contagious endeavour as its predecessors, the track strolls along with a knowing and inventive swagger; its hands on receptive hips and tenacious feet teasing and taunting them into action with its creative zeal. As all tracks there is also a meatier, raucous edge and air which coats it all, the band’s punk instincts adding to the increasingly tenacious and imposing treat.

From one major highlight to another and Wreck of the Hesperus. As soon as it lays down its first line of bait, the song becomes a tapestry of seductive espionage woven from deceptive hooks and devious grooves, neither seemingly as intrusive and enslaving as they really are. With every passing second, the band’s rock ‘n’ roll heart becomes bolder, closing in on a volatile, increasingly menacing psychosis of a finale to leave an appetite hungry for more.

That heavier, irritable essence is still hanging round as next up The 90s Called, It Wants Yr Misspent Youth Back rumbles in ears. It is a ravenous bordering on rabid incitement from which a smiling groove and teasing stroll breaks free. Now with its relaxed but irresistible swing wrapped ingenuity fondling the senses, the song simply traps and chains the passions with something akin to We Are The Physics meets The Futureheads.

The cosmic twittering of { } leads in the evocative pastures of closing track Brittle Bones and an epic and increasingly dense rapture of melodic suggestion and angular jangles around rhythmic trespass. Holding its own lively groove led saunter, the song sees Wax Futures push their emotive intensity and creative designing yet again; both intensifying as the song brews and boils up into a powder keg of sonic turbulence eventually sending the album off into spatial unknowns leaving the listener lingering on keen anticipation for what comes next from the band.

The Museum of Everything is Wax Futures upon a new lofty plateau in songwriting and sound. At times it might not ignite as it hints it will and maybe lacks a final bite to its most agitated moments but only announces the band as a real player within the UK rock scene and a stalwart in the passions of certainly our personal soundtracks, something hard to imagine being alone in.

The Museum of Everything is out now @ https://waxfutures.bandcamp.com/

 

https://www.facebook.com/waxfutures    https://twitter.com/waxfuturesuk

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dirty Jane – Boogie Monster

There is a new hypnotic rumble brewing in the belly of the Birmingham underground scene and it goes by the name of Dirty Jane. This salaciously flirtatious garage punk ‘n’ roll filly is not exactly brand new, the British trio emerging in 2014 but they have just made their national introduction with debut single Boogie Monster, a track with a primal swagger which simply infests body and spirit.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Jack Brown, bassist John Beadsmore, and drummer Elliot Morris, Dirty Jane has become an eagerly supported and talked about proposition within the Midlands music scene; earning a fine reputation for their energetic live presence amidst shows alongside the likes of The Strypes, The Sherlocks, The Computers, The Dirty Nil and most recently Hvmm. As mentioned, Boogie Monster is the band’s first fingering of national attention and surely lustful reactions such the infectious devilry breeding the single.

Fusing garage punk and punk rock with fifties rock ‘n’ roll, the Dirty Jane sound prowls ears and psyche like a fusion of The Cramps, The Phantom, Dick Venom and The Terrortones, and Eighteen Nightmares At the Lux; a creative breed of temptation which instantly has ears and appetite inflamed as the single sonically and vocally shatters the silence. Within another breath, rhythms are prowling the senses with a lively almost predacious gait casting catchy menace for Brown to vocally embrace. With insatiable hooks equally grabbing ears all along his guitar’s swarthy grooves, a delicious grumble to Beadsmore’s bass alongside, and the whole of the band courting thick involvement with their vocal roars, the song demands lusty participation, Morris’ tenaciously swinging beats extra incentive.

Produced by Gavin Monaghan, Boogie Monster is quite simply irresistible; its psych rock essences icing on the diablerie escaping the band and if a sign of things to come, the beginning of major mischief and adventure for and from Dirty Jane.

Boogie Monster is out now on 7” from the Magic Garden Vinyl @ http://magicgardenvinyl.uk/Store/ and digitally through iTunes.

http://www.dirtyjane.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/Dirtyjanemusic/   https://twitter.com/dirtyjaneuk

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Royal – Seven

Photo by: DeanX Photography

The final breath of March saw Dutch metallers The Royal release their sophomore album via Longbranch/SPV, an emotional and technical cauldron of melodic metalcore which is simply hard to ignore. The Eindhoven hailing quintet is being talked of with big expectations for their future and through their second full-length, Seven it is easy to see why.

Formed in 2012, The Royal has proceeded to breed and earn a potent reputation at home and further afield year by year. Their first year saw the release of the Origins EP with the well-received single Blind Eye coming a year later. Debut album Dreamcatchers further pushed the band into broader attention with its unveiling in 2014 whilst live the five-piece has drawn plaudits, the band going on to support the likes of Architects and Breakdown Of Sanity and play events such as Jera On Air and the Impericon Festival. Seven though just might be the wake-up call to bigger and greater opportunities; certainly its eventful and resourceful exploits deserves a moment with the metal world’s attention.

The album opens up with Thunder, a track living up to its title. Stormy clouds gather as the track settles into place, riffs respectfully but menacingly harrying the senses before wiry grooves erupt and vein its increasingly tempestuous climate. Soon the song hits its virulent stride, rhythms an imposing trespassing on the senses as the guitars snarl and weave their creative textures within the ebb and flow of the assault. All the while vocalist Semuel Pisarahu boils with emotional ire and open antipathy, a scowling hue equally striking in the web of enterprise, melodic suggestiveness, and raw aggression getting the album off to a mighty start.

Its mix of flavours is another potent aspect to the song and matched within the following Feeding Wolves. Its first touch is a melodic gentleness though soon joined by the low key but open grumble of Loet Brinkmans’ bass and the meaty jab and roll of Tom Van Ekerschot’s beats. As Pisarahu growls, the track erupts into another hellacious yet inviting tempest speared by a predacious swing and spicy grooves. As in the first song, guitarists JD Liefting and Pim Wesselink reveal themselves as comfortable seducing ears with warm melodies as they are ravaging them with bracing and abrasive hostility, their imagination and craft adding to the inventive unpredictability of the song and indeed album.

The mercurial character of the second track similarly grabs the imagination; a quality all songs have in varying degrees. Next up Wildmind is less changeable, more a persistent blaze of irritable jaundice but also flowing through creative twists and turns. Though not quite matching up to the first pair in igniting the passions, it leaves satisfaction full and appetite hungry for the proposals offered next by Creeds And The Vultures and Counterculture. The first has a mean-spirited air to its attitude and touch but one tempered by the maze of winding grooves and captivating melodies wrapping the vocal tension whilst its successor and the band’s new single rocks with relish while also creating a web of melodic enticement and vitriol lit dynamics, rhythmically and sonically. There is a toxic and intoxicating depth to its body, keys a hug of beauty, guitars a kaleidoscope of intent and endeavour as Pisarahu leads the raw vocal roar.

From the melancholy drenched atmospheric instrumental Interlude, the album’s title track has ears and imagination entwined, instantly too as its opening guitar twang flirts with instincts before they are infested by a glorious net of rapacious grooves. Another song which is rock ‘n’ roll at heart and carnivorous in persona, it crawls into the psyche; colouring its realms with fluttering melodies and animalistic textures. Middle Eastern spices only add to its majesty, the track emerging as quite simply aural captivation.

Life Breaker unleashes its ravenous sinews and creative rancor next, though again beauty is as prevalent in its physical nature as emotional discord while Thalassa is an invasive animus of sound and emotion which, without skimping on sonic light, is a darker, more vindictive enmity. Both tracks hit the spot, the former dead centre, before Draining Veins gives its melody woven volcano a friction of vocal and rhythmic tension which boils to inhospitable crescendos across its ever shifting and provocative soundscape.

The album closes with Viridian, a song epitomising the fluid ability of the band to tap into and blend contrasting emotions and textures whilst simultaneously challenging and stirring the listener. It is also a mighty collusion of sonic flirtation and predacious alienation bringing the album to an impressive end.

There are times when, on the surface, tracks share similar essences and personalities to other songs but attention and time defuses any apparent sameness. What emerges, is a creatively immense and thoroughly enjoyable proposition which, for appetites of bands like August Burns Red, While She Sleeps, and Northlane, of metalcore which wants to push itself, is a definite must check out.

Seven is out now via Longbranch/SPV. All links available @ https://theroyal.lnk.to/Seven

http://www.theroyalofficial.com/   https://www.facebook.com/theroyalofficial/  https://twitter.com/theroyalmetal   https://theroyalofficial.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Deference – False Awakening

Increasingly compelling, False Awakening is the new EP from British metallers Deference. A maelstrom of ravenous textures and flavours caught in an equally imposing web of emotion, the release not only forcibly pleases ears but also suggests this is a band with the potential to be a big part of the UK metal scene.

Coming from Southampton, Deference weave in inspirations from the likes of Architects, Northlane, Periphery, and Oh Sleeper into their tapestry of melody rich metalcore with djent and progressive metal tendencies. The quintet has been climbing the ladder with a rapid ascent in recent times, the release of 2015 debut EP XXXVII and live successes alongside bands such as Rolo Tomassi, Napoleon, The Hell, and Shields as well as a European Tour with True Lie all increasing their reputation. False Awakening is a creative echo of an outfit ready to break into national recognition, the next unavoidable step for a band beginning to make their potent mark.

The release opens with Scavengers. A steely shimmer initially coaxes ears, senses strapping riffs soon following as rhythms and guitars grumble around the plaintive vocal roar of Rob Lea. That djent styled essence is equally as swift infecting song and satisfaction, the guitars of Matt Dennison and Jonathan Prince creating a spiky attitude and touch in their emerging weave of enterprise. Strapped to the muscular grouch of Shaun Kirtland’s bass and the animosity loaded swings of drummer Mike Hill, the track is a formidable introduction to the EP; not necessarily unique but relentlessly exhilarating.

The might start slips away to be replaced by the instantly ravenous Insomnia; its immediate wall of sonic trespass the bed for melodic and technical dexterity to blossom. It is an intriguing mixture which takes longer to ignite the imagination than its predecessor’s tempest but grows into a rich captivation especially as raw and aggression vocal contemplations are joined by an impressive clean delivery from Lea, Dennison adding his potent vocal backing throughout. Persistently turbulent across its vociferous landscape, a tempestuous climate equally as open in the track’s mellower melancholy thick yet stark moments, the song has the imagination as gripped as ears throughout.

New single Departure follows, growing from another solemn but engaging melody equipped peace with keys colouring its atmospheric questioning before again vocal and sonic volatility takes hold and seize the moment. As another maze of sound and invention descends, Deference reinforce the potency of their  presence and creative dexterity, the song shifting through numerous cycles all capturing the imagination if again with increasing persuasion rather than an immediate one though indeed its first listen or two leaves pleasure alive.

The EP’s title track has an almost carnal air and character as it ravages the senses straight away, an antipathy which rather than diminishes simply expands its scope as clean vocals and melodic endeavour gets involved in the volcanic explosion. The track is superb, unpredictable yet with plenty of familiar spices only adding to its impressive blaze of sound and emotive exploration. Rabid and composed, vicious and seductive, the track is a collision of extremes and imagination breeding a mighty storm again fusing varied metal bred hues in its cataclysmic squall.

The release closes with Become Death Part 2, an initially gentle melodic romancing of the senses around a vocal sample. As destructive elements fall upon the calm, the song is fallout of corroded beauty, an epochal epilogue to the EP’s themes looking at “a man-made apocalyptic world.”

The buzz is that Deference is ready to take their place to the fore of the UK metal scene; whether it is sooner or later it is expected success backed up by False Awakening and its striking contents.

The False Awakening EP is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/WeAreDeference/    https://twitter.com/DeferenceMusic   https://deference.bandcamp.com/releases

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Electus – Ticket to Nowhere

With their second album just uncaged, UK rockers Electus offer a compelling reason for checking it out with the single Ticket to Nowhere. A hard rock bred infection embracing the attributes of alternative rock and meatier metallic essences, the track is a ready-made excuse for bodies to stomp and spirit to take a turn for the better.

Formed by vocalist/rhythm guitarist Russell Peake in 2008, Wolverhampton hailing Electus has built a potent reputation on the Midlands rock scene with matching and increasingly acclaimed ripples on the national scene through their live presence and 2015 unveiled debut album The Dark. With its current line-up completed that same year, lead guitarist Pete Checkley, bassist Dan Smith, and drummer Mick Hales alongside Peake, Electus are now ready to provoke far bigger spotlights with sophomore album Rock & Roll Incarnate Part One; an encounter which if Ticket to Nowhere is anything to go by, has the potential to push the band towards that success.

The single instantly has ears on board, its opening rhythmic shuffle sparking short scythes of thick riffs amidst percussive enticement. From there a devilish hook grows and thrives, spatial shimmers skirting its persistent temptation. In turn, the move into a controlled and mercilessly rousing stroll with rock ‘n’ roll tenacity only tightens the song’s already firm grip on ears.

With infectiousness at every turn and spicy melodic enterprise lurking on every corner, the track is a prowling slice of devilry; almost predatory in its intent to turn on feet and hips while refusing to accept no for an answer to its catchy questions. It all makes for a superb song which seems to become more flirtatious and compelling with every listen, and convincing in the suggestion that Rock & Roll Incarnate Part One just has to be investigated.

Both Ticket to Nowhere and Rock & Roll Incarnate Part One are available now.

Upcoming Live Dates:

Saturday 8th April 2017 – The Slade Rooms, Wolverhampton for the MAYOR FEST 2017

Sunday 30th April – Roadhouse, Birmingham

Wednesday 5th July – Robin 2, Wolverhampton

Sunday 3rd December – The Arches, Coventry for Winterfest 2017

http://www.electus-music.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/Electus.Official.uk    https://twitter.com/electusuk

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2017
Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Caesaria – Wavin’ Goodbye

Setting up the September scheduled release of a new EP, French outfit Caesaria have video/single Wavin’ Goodbye out to tempt: the song a slice of electro pop/rock bringing instant infection to ears and body.

Consisting of Théo Chaumard, Ced Machi, Thomas Fariney, and Louis Arcens, the 2013 formed Caesaria has already earned potent attention and support with their debut EP Sparks of Visions. Offering five tracks giving the dance-floor a busy time, the band has surrounded its success with a live presence which has included opening for Naive New Beaters and appearances at festivals such as Printemps de Bourges music festival and Les Eurockéennes de Belfort.

As mentioned, Wavin’ Goodbye is the prelude to their next EP, a song embracing familiar essences in its own fresh and energetic bounce. Keys shimmer in and around ears initially, closely following vocals cloaked in harmonies as eager to entice as the rhythmic coaxing now at play. Once into its infectious stride, the song glistens with melodic enterprise whilst its jangle feels like it is teasing the darker grooves of the bass. In some ways the track is like a fusion of Heaven 17 and Orange Juice, in other ways MGMT meets Empire Of The Sun comes to mind; all flavours which add to the overall shine of the song and its introspective theme of a dying person looking back on their life.

Increasingly accomplished and contagious, the track similarly growing in its creative textures, Wavin’ Goodbye provides plenty for body and pleasure to find a keen appetite for whilst setting up that forthcoming EP very nicely.

Wavin’ Goodbye is out now.

http://www.caesaria.fr/     https://www.facebook.com/wearecaesaria/    https://twitter.com/WEARECAESARIA

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyrigh