Deadite – The Damned

cover_RingMasterReview

After a fine year for the label, Hamburg based Undead Artists have got its successor off in fine style with the release of The Damned by Belgian horror punks Deadite. The album is a multi-flavoured roar blending strains of psychobilly, rock ‘n’ roll, and other ravenous textures into horror fuelled punk rock. It makes for a tantalising and captivating proposal becoming more compelling with every listen.

Hailing from Hamme, the quartet of Scarecrow, Wolfben, EvilOnly, and Von Nekromance have persistently stirred attention and eager support at home and further afield but for a great many The Damned will be an introduction; one sure to keep their ‘secrecy’ no longer.

From the cinematic Intro, the release roars into view with The Shadows and a surge of classic rock ‘n’ roll chords. It is the lead into a stomping charge of senses whipping rhythms and toxic grooves as vocals melodically growl. Psychobilly and horror punk collude as the track throws its lustful energy and sounds around, making for a potent start to the album though soon eclipsed by the outstanding Age Of Violence. With belligerence oozing from every note and vocal breath, the track’s nagging riffs and attitude loaded bassline alone seizes the passions, raw vocal antagonism and rhythmic trespasses reinforcing its punk rock lure as spicy grooves ignite.

The album’s title track steps forward next, its brooding climate and Tiger Army like air quickly seducing ears and imagination. Vocals too have a calmer presence and resonance which just adds to the haunting charm and atmosphere of the encounter resulting in the release stepping up another notch in impressiveness again.

Cored by a tangy hook, Collector grabs the appetite straight away next, its Rezurex/Plan 9 like stroll simultaneously menacing and infectious and the swinging relentless beats a greed inducing pressure while the following Show Me Some Love has a touch of Batmobile meets Misfits to it. The song is an equally predacious and virulent persuasion to the former with rhythms once more an irresistible infestation of body and instincts.

Pussywhipped shares its fifties breeding with relish after them; country seeds open within the excellent old school stomp before Empty Heart romances the senses with its sultry melodies and vocal croon. Rhythms and riffs insert the tenacious energy which instinctively flows from the band with Calabrese spiced enterprise playing around their eagerness throughout. The pair alone shows the variety in the Deadite sound, a diversity not always making big steps but certainly providing a broad and flavoursome adventure to get hooked on.

That bait continues through the feistier muscular throes of Damnation and the predatory prowl of The Taker, another track sparking references to the likes of Calabrese and Tiger Army within its own bold character. The Mark Of Cain after them though is proud to wear its inspirations boldly, the song a mix of Misfits and Samhain and also easy to breed greed for.

Roadkill is a grouchy assault of punk and hard rock whipping up rich satisfaction next, its success matched by the similarly punk driven Same Shit Different Day offering a minute and half of intrusively catchy rock ‘n’ roll before Cursed brings the whole pleasurable time to a close with its smouldering psychobilly serenade.

It is a great end to an impressive and richly enjoyable release; not quite a classic but not far off from a band with the potential for such a genre igniting proposal in their growing imagination.

The Damned is out now through Undead Artists @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/the-damned

https://www.facebook.com/pg/deadite138   http://www.deadite.be/

Pete RingMaster 02/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Valensole – Where We Should Be

valensole-promo-shotSum 41, Green Day, Nirvana; all bands which have been an influence in an eclectic bunch on the Southampton trio. All are flavours easy to understand being used but for us just as potent, maybe even more so, are references to others such as Psychedelic Furs, Reuben, and Pennywise

The debut EP from British punksters Valensole has been recommended as for fans of the likes of Sum 41, Green Day, Nirvana; all bands which have been an influence in an eclectic bunch on the Southampton trio. All are flavours easy to understand being used but for us just as potent, maybe even more so, are references to others such as Psychedelic Furs, Reuben, and Pennywise. What it shows is that there are many rich essences in a sound which still is finding its feet and ultimate identity on the evidence of the band’s debut EP, Where We Should Be but a mix and imagination of sound which also ensures that their introduction is an impressive and thickly enjoyable one.

Embracing the punk DIY ethic, Valensole have unleashed their first self-released outing alone, vocalist/guitarist and primary songwriter Elliott Jones taking on mixing duties. The result is a raw and pleasingly dirty affair which it is easy to imagine captures the band’s live presence much more than most encounters do their creators. It leaps from the blocks in potent style with opener Staple Waster. Spicy riffs collude with concussive beats initially, their slim but irresistible bait the intro into a muggy affair of fuzzy riffs and biting rhythms. Jones soon gets involved vocally, that Psychedelic Furs spicing arising as his tones remind of Richard Butler from said outfit with a whiff of Billy Idol too. The track continues to impose and tease with attitude and flirtatious hooks; boisterous punk rock invading and pleasing ears and a quickly forming appetite for the Valensole sound.

valensole-cover-artworkSum 41, Green Day, Nirvana; all bands which have been an influence in an eclectic bunch on the Southampton trio. All are flavours easy to understand being used but for us just as potent, maybe even more so, are references to others such as Psychedelic Furs, Reuben, and PennywiseDon’t Follow Me leaps in next, its body and character just as aggressively relishing the trespassing of the senses. Managing to prowl around at the same time as devouring them with rapacious energy, the song snarls and growls with the hooks of lead guitarist Nick Jones inescapable and the bass taunts of Dave Parker gripping, his backing vocals to Jones just as persuasive.

An immediately tempting hook spears next up Believe, its salacious tease erupting amidst another scuzzy wash of sound and vocals with a tinge of The Heartbreakers to it. Rolling, rumbling beats are just as virulent in the fiercely infectious slice of rough ‘n’ ready pop punk quickly followed by the band’s new single and EP title track. Where We Should Be taps into an early Generation X scented countenance, riffs and rhythms a magnetically caustic and intrusive yet seductive trespass in a boisterous song quickly involving the listener.

Completed by the enjoyably abrasive and just as often melodically tempered Inside Out, a concluding slab of easy to devour rock ‘n’ roll, Where We Should Be only leaves a want and hunger for more. It is soaked in strength of potential matching its already very agreeable attributes, a mix providing a great first contact with Valensole and intrigue loaded anticipation for their subsequent growth and releases.

The Where We Should Be EP is released through all stores on March 3rd.

https://www.facebook.com/valensoleband/   https://twitter.com/valensole_band  https://www.instagram.com/valensole_band/

Pete RingMaster 02/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sertraline – Guilty

Sertraline

Sertraline

March sees the release of a new EP from British melodic metallers Sertraline, an encounter earning a fair amount of anticipation due to its well-received predecessor and the band’s increasing reputation. The Guilty EP offers five potent slices of rock and metal fronted by the quickly engaging tones of Lizzie, tracks which revel in the new growth of sound and imagination spawning them from within the band.

Formed in the Autumn of 2014, the Stoke-on-Trent hailing band quickly stirred up a loyal local fan base and close attention, their first single a couple of months in, Set The World Alight, luring strong radio play and support from BBC Introducing. Their well-received debut EP Bury The Ghosts pushed the band into national spotlights in 2015, its success more than backed by Sertraline’s dynamic live presence which has seen them shared stages with the likes of Butcher Babies, Toseland, Kobra and the Lotus, Skarlett Riot, and Normandie along the way. Last year saw a new line-up in place and the further honing of the band’s sound, Guilty showing the enjoyable results from the evolution.

The EP title track is first up, ears consumed by a wall of carnivorous riffs and intrusive rhythms. It is a striking appetite raising start soon relinquishing its threat as a wiry melody escapes the guitar. Any disappointment from losing that raw trespass dissipates as Lizzie’s tones dance on the emerging web of riffs and grooves from Mike and Wilson. With beats still swiping with fierce intent as the bass of Hendo enticingly grumbles, the song takes a firm grip of ears and imagination. Throat raw growls intermittently join the adventure, contrasting with the harmonic beauty of Lizzie but for personal tastes lacking the bite to be as successful as their certainly welcomed addition could have been. Nevertheless it only adds to the strong character and increasing potency of the excellent track.

sertraline-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewSuccessor Snakes opens with a melodic coaxing, atmospherics gently kissing a lone melody before a weave of Periphery scented enterprise sparks song and imagination. As the first, the individual prowess of the band is a captivation, their combined adventure just as compelling if lacking the imposing impact of the first track. It is the subtlety of its twists and turns which predominantly make that difference resulting in the song taking longer to reach the same heights though with listens it surely does.

New video/single Change Of Heart is next, an even mellower proposal with a poppier catchiness to a harmonic stroll courted by cantankerous riffs, rhythmic punches, and that coarser expulsion of voice. It is obvious single material, melodies and Lizzie tantalising but does not quite live up to those around it for personal tastes though still adding to the EP’s success.

Nyeevise gets the appetite keenly back on track, its opening brooding presence carrying a whiff of Breed 77 to it before bolder sinews spin a glorious web of steely riffs and rapacious senses twisting grooves. Like a mix of Halestorm and Forever Still, the song growls and seduces; vocals and guitars providing an alluring blend of contrasting textures and creative drama.

Bringing the release to a highly satisfying close is I Admit The Blame, an emotive serenade with fire in its heart and melancholic beauty in its roar as well as creative attitude in its body. Another which grows with every listen rather than making a swift impact, it is a fine end to a thoroughly pleasing encounter. We are still not sure about the harsh side of the vocals, they missing the ‘savagery’ desired, but still an inventive part of the fresh blaze fuelling the Sertraline sound which will only take the band to higher plateaus.

The Guilty EP is out March 3rd @ http://www.wearesertraline.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/WeAreSertraline/   https://twitter.com/wearesertraline

 Pete RingMaster 02/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright