Entering the creative web of Era 9

era-9_RingMasterReview

Canadian rockers Era 9 have no regard for boundaries in their sound, weaving strands of numerous flavours and styles in their attention demanding rock ‘n’ roll. It is a proposal drawing fresh ears and appetites with persistent success, so as the band move closer to releasing their next highly anticipated record, we took the chance to find out more….

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to its beginnings?

Hi, thanks for having us! We have Laurie and Lalla on lead vocals, Jona on guitar, Joe on bass, and Marco on drums.

Jona, Marco and Joe met in high school, all sharing the same passion for music, and that progressed to the start of a band, and lead them to where we are today.

Have you all been involved in other bands before? If so how have those experiences impacted on what you are doing now?

Yes, some of us have been in other bands before. Playing music at such a young age, you learn so much and grow with experience. Your appreciation for other genres of music grows and you become more open minded with time. We’ve matured over the years and so has our writing and composition, bringing us to how we write our music now, merging a whole bunch of different styles together that might not be very usual in the Rock scene.

What inspired the band name?

The number 9 represents liberty and positivity. We are a new era of music that isn’t just for one person, we cater to all who opens themselves to it! We value creative freedom in music and we promote open mindedness and imagination. Hence, ERA 9.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

No there was no specific idea at first, we just wanted to play music that we loved listening to. With time we started loving and appreciating other styles of music other than rock and decided to merge it all together, creating “TrapRock”.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

We still have the same goal, which is to make music we love and show it to the world. But of course, with years of experience you learn a lot by making mistakes, failing, getting back up, and never giving up on what we strongly believe in.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Our roots come from Rock music and that’s how we started. Over the years, we’ve grown with experience, playing shows, listening to different genres, etc. Coming from Montreal, we’ve learned to appreciate all styles of music. We live in a city that is very multi-cultural and has a very diverse music scene. Our city is really big on Hip-Hop and EDM and we wanted to break down all stylistic boundaries and merge all the styles of music we love, creating what we call “TrapRock”.

era92_RingMasterReviewHas it been more of an organic movement of sound or does  the band deliberately go out to try new things?

It was definitely more of an organic movement of sound. We love Rock, Metal, Trap, Hip-Hop, EDM, and R&B. Our drummer Marco would make a lot of Hip-Hop beats and Pop songs for other artists, making us decide to try and use some of his ideas within our songwriting.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

It’s more of genres of music that inspire us most, rather than just bands. The core of our music will be hard rock, with heavy riffs, but we enjoy changing up the basic usual structure of songs to an EDM/Trap type of structure, with interesting electronic and hip-hop sounds.

Is there a particular process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs and where do you draw inspirations from for the lyrical side of your songs?

We are all writers. Usually, someone will come up with a basic rough song idea and send it to the band, and if we’re all vibing off it, we’ll elaborate on our ideas and all add our touch to it. Marco will then add his touch and program some electronic and hip-hop ideas.

What inspires us most lyrically is usually how we’re feeling and what we’re going through in the moment. Whether it’s struggles, love, heartbreak, anger, or society, etc., we all have emotions and stories to tell.

Can you give us some background to your latest release and an insight to its song’s themes?

We unofficially released our EP in 2016, called Warrior, and we will be releasing a full length album in Spring 2017, called Gravity. The themes vary from song to song, depending on how we’re feeling or what one of us is going through in our lives at that moment. As we’ve said, whether it’s life’s struggles, love, heartbreak, anger, or society, etc., we all have emotions and stories to tell.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop as you record?

Luckily, we have our own studio in our hometown, which makes it very easy for us to record at any time. We also record on the road, in our R.V. Everything is recorded and mixed in house by our bass player Joe. We usually like to write and record our ideas and get it to the final state before getting into the booth for the final recording.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

The feeling we get while on stage is indescribable. Seeing everyone jump up and down and singing our lyrics while we’re up there is just amazing. We love how our music can bring everyone together, whether you’re male or female, black or white.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there the opportunities in Montreal still for new bands to make a mark?era93_RingMasterReview

Any type of art is a tough career to be successful in. There is so much competition out there. You have to be willing to risk it all, fail, drop everything, leave it all behind and get on the road. We are constantly working, whether it’s writing, making music videos, or networking and creating business relationships. There is definitely opportunities to make a mark if you’re talented, believe in what you’re doing, and if you’re willing to do whatever it takes to be heard. In terms of where we’ve toured and performed around the U.S., we always get great feedback on what we’re trying to do and new loyal fans. We love the support we’ve been receiving so far!

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or something a band can always use to their advantage?

It has its pros and cons. It definitely becomes more positive with time as a band grows in popularity, because once you have that audience reach, your music will be shared around the world instantly, unlike back in the day where it took time for places around the world to hear bands or artists. All they had was radio and word of mouth. But it can also be negative for bands starting out in terms of making money, due to downloading of music nowadays. You just have to keep working harder than the competition out there, by taking advantage of all these networking platforms that exist. Create and release as much content as possible, and make it easily accessible on all these platforms. The more people hear your music, the more it will be shared, and that’s when success will come!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

We’ve been writing new material and gearing up to take over the world in 2017. Make sure to follow us on all social networks @era9official and join 9gAng now at http://www.era9.com to receive updates on upcoming tours, and release dates of new music. Thanks again for having us!

https://www.facebook.com/era9official    https://www.instagram.com/era9official/

Pete RingMaster 02/02/2017

 

Union Jack – Supersonic

uxj_RingMasterReview

It has been twenty years since Paris hailing Union Jack first stomped around with their anger fuelled, ska infested punk ‘n’ roll, a celebration marked by the release of a brand new slab of infectious aggression. Supersonic is the trio’s seventh full-length, a stonking riot driven by the band’s familiar yet individual sound which simply hits the spot dead centre.

Across six albums and a host of EPs, Union Jack have honed their sound into one intrusively virulent proposal, a strain of punk rock with catchiness as potent as its irritability at the world. Live it has ignited hordes of fans, earning the band a big reputation across their homeland, into Europe, and Canada while sharing stages with the likes of The Damned, DOA, UK Subs, Leftöver Crack, Swingin Utters, Subhumans, The Aggrolites, The Movement, Inner Terrestrials and many more. Even so, they still may be an unknown quality to a great many, something that Supersonic should amend.

Recorded at Sofa Studio with RomTomCat, mixed and mastered by Mike Major ( At the Drive-in, Sparta, Coheed And Cambria, Gone is Gone), and with additional contributions on certain songs by Thomas Birnbacher (upright bass/organ), Phillipe Cattafesta (piano/organ), and Joe Robinne (organ), Supersonic grabs ears from its first breath. Cynical Sound Club starts things stomping, a brief introduction urgently loaded with wicked hooks and punchy rhythms as the band gathers all its wiles ready for next up Oh Boogie. The second track bounces around with attitude and aggressive energy tempered by the warm touch of an organ. The mischievous bassline is irresistible, riffs spice for the ears while the twin vocal attack of guitarist Tom Marchal and bassist/pianist Rude Ben are intrusive ringleaders in the magnificent raw and wild melody hooked romp.

Wordaholic has an even rawer air to its character and presence, Antoine Sirven Gabiache’s swinging beats leading the way as vocals and grooves leave lingering imprints on the senses and psyche. Like a mix of  Swingin’ Utters and Faintest Idea, the song brawls and flirts with the listener, showing recognisable essences while uncaging its own antagonistic delights before Blackout unveils choppy riffs and slapping beats as again the excellent unity between the band’s contrasting vocals bring their own magnetic clamour to the catchy ire pumped mix. Both tracks use the body like a puppeteer, resistance to their swinging rhythms and wicked hooks pointless though each is over shadowed a touch by the punk rock roar of Boomerang. Stalking ears with a predacious bassline, enslaving them with the tangiest hooks as vocals entangle participation in their physical and emotional affray, the track is glorious; a Billy Talent like spicing added pleasure.

art_RingMasterReviewNext up Purple Pride offers a melodic core not too far removed from its predecessor’s and indeed the track lacks the same incendiary spark but still has pleasure and appetite greedy with its raw punk ‘n’ roll belligerence while the bubbly but sonically raw assault of Human Zoo straight, also just missing out on the heights of earlier songs, is still nothing less than fiercely enjoyable with its unpredictable nuances and twists.

Bitter Taste shows a calmer nature as keys and melodies swing with a summery energy though still Union Jack drive it with an instinctive aggression which commands attention. Another song which easily has feet and hips in tandem and the spirit railing against the world; it is one fun and impressive warm up for the album’s best track. Don’t Look Back swiftly steals favourite spot, laying the seeds with its psychobilly nurtured bass slaps and sealing the deal with its Tiger Army like groove. From there the band’s punk heart drives the thrills; ska licks and senses rapping beats as well as elements reminding of bands like The Vox Dolomites and The Peacocks treats in the track’s heady swing.

Through the raucously catchy skirmish of Summer Waves, a song with a Buzzcocks like hook to lick lips over, and the ska infested rock ‘n’ roll of The Globe, the captivating aural roughhousing only sparks new waves of pleasure. The underlying variety in the album’s sound is also further highlighted though You and I returns to the more expected Union Jack musical ruckus with no complaints offered. It still springs a smart web of melodies and hooks though to stand apart with a Biting Elbows like rock/punk invention adding extra spice to its scrap.

It is an essence which also infests the excellent Bones, a coincidental similarity to the just mentioned Russian band no bad thing as the song twists and turns with quarrelsome anthemic chest beating before slipping away for Hate To Say Goodbye to close things off, the slither of music a reprise to that first welcome by Supersonic.

The album is a real joy deserving the attention of all those with an appetite for ska punk and punk rock in any guise.

Supersonic is released February 1st on Beer Records in collaboration with Guerilla Asso, Old Town Bicyclette, and Riot Ska Records for the UK, and through https://unionjack.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/badska/

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ethmebb – La Quête du Saint Grind

ethmebbok_RingMasterReview

The band’s Facebook profile tags their sound as epicleptic power death / progressive metal; a description which pretty much does sum up the anarchic fun of the Ethmebb if still leaving their imagination short changed. Their music is crazed, it is drunk on almost schizophrenic adventure, and at times it certainly leaves the imagination intoxicated but as shown by new album La Quête du Saint Grind, it is also a myriad of flavours, skilfully sculpted, and downright fun.

Apart from emerging in 2012, apparently from “the still-smouldering ashes of Grindcore band Ethmeb”, there is little more we can tell you about the Paris hailing quartet but then again their debut album does all the talking. Wrapped in the fine artwork of Nicolas Dubuisson, the release swiftly makes a potent impression, first track Tathor, l’Echalote de ses Morts soon feeding and adding to the intrigue already sparked by its cover.

Opening up a tale of a mighty warrior and his adventures as he tries to get back his Grind stolen from him “so he can get laid again”, the starter is an atmospherically suggestive, melody caressed instrumental. It is ‘similar’ to many imagination stroking starts that metal and progressive releases seem to hold but a vibrantly pleasing one, its more straight forward body a deception to the mania to follow.

ethmebb-album-artwork_RingMasterReviewrvbThat creative ‘insanity’ is uncaged through Lost my Grind. Riffs rifle the senses immediately, their enjoyable invasion soon joined by the dawning of melodies and floating harmonies as wiry grooves entangle the progressively nurtured blossoming of the track. A tenacious blend of power and death metal with that progressive nature envelops ears though it is only part of the picture as symphonic elements merge with grouchily aggressive and subsequently blackened essences, not forgetting various other unpredictable twists of fun. The vocals of guitarist Rémi Molette are a guttural trespass enjoyably tempering and complimenting the melodic quest of his and Victor Tunidjah’s guitars, their sonic web radiant and evocative within the epic nature of the song.

It is an excellent start soon eclipsed by next up Orlango Blum. From caressing harmonies it surges through ears with cantankerous riffs and majestically flourishing keys. The bass of François Santenoff throbs provocatively in the midst of the enticing tempest as the rapier like swings of drummer Damien Baissile pierce the folkish lined melodic death canvas. There is a touch of Trepalium to the song, 6:33 too, but quickly it stretches its already riveting tapestry of sound and imagination into something irresistibly unique and compelling. Melody soaked passages are oases in the storm yet every imposing second is a conjuring of raw aggression, creative ferocity, and seductively bedlamic enterprise.

The warrior’s quest continues through GPS: Gobelin Par Satellite and A la recherche de la découverte de la quête pour trouver le Saint Grind, the first a thrilling mix of the raw folk ‘n’ roll of Ensiferum and the creative psychosis of Carnival in Coal involved with plenty of other strains of imagination while getting involved with a great array of clean and dirtier vocals. Its successor is just as eclectic, from an acoustic stroll weaving a colourful intrusion of extreme and melodic endeavour all bound in an unhinged devilry.

It is fair to say that the Ethmebb sound is not going to connect with those only hankering for straightforward metal but for an appetite for creative boldness bordering on the meshuga; it is manna for the ears as proven yet again by next up Pirates of the Caribou. Concussive in its touch, promiscuous in its flavours, the folk/power metal fusion roars with drama and prowls with venomous intent, guitars spinning another inventive web as vocals anthemically unite and melodies swagger with boozy spicing. Its ebb and flows in intensity are just as masterful and alluring, as too its aggressive invention and multifarious nature.

Bruce Lee mena l’Amour brings the release to a close, the track probably the most loco of the lot though smouldering in persuasion initially before growing into its inventive skin with every passing minute to heartily convince. With a growing theatre of sound it is a fine end, though listen out for the Pryapisme like hidden track, to a thoroughly enjoyable and impressive debut album from Ethmebb and the beginning here to a greedy appetite for their insanity kissed world.

La Quête du Saint Grind is out now and available through https://ethmebb.bandcamp.com/album/la-qu-te-du-saint-grind

https://www.facebook.com/ethmebb

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2017

 

.bipolar. – Seven EP

bipolar_RingMasterReview

Consisting of four emotionally intrusive and sonically bracing tracks, the Seven EP marks and continues the growth of sound and invention unleashed by Las Vegas based metallers .bipolar. across previous releases. It is an irritable and creatively imposing affair bred from various strains of metal with a healthy dose of punk hostility. It merges familiar essences with the band’s own distinct inventive character, creating an onslaught as provocative and intriguing as it is ferocious.

Emerging in Northern California in 2003, .bipolar. was recognized within a year as Best Metal band by the Sacramento News & Review. Since then they have played hundreds of shows, honing their sound and reaping praise all the time, exploration backed by a handful of well-received releases. 2008 saw vocalist Charlie and drummer Brian Hanks relocating to Las Vegas and it is fair to say the band’s creativity and reputation really blossomed from that point on as guitarists Jaisen Hinds and Kevin Lemus, and bassist Chris Kmit subsequently joined to establish the current line-up.

Seven sees the band at its most adventurous yet, confronting and pleasing ears with a new sense of development and maturity without losing the raw energy and aggression, lyrically and musically which has already marked them out. Latest single Ernest leads the way, the opener building a wall of stabbing riffs and similarly invasive beats as Charlie prowls the landscape. Her tones are caustic and full of the irritancy lining the sounds around her, but equally magnetic and bewitching as she begins showing her range of melodic serenading. Spicy hooks and winy melodies tease and flirt within the tempestuous climate, not always as freely open as they might be but a reward for closer and longer inspection as the track makes a fiercely enjoyable and impressive introduction to the EP.

sevenepdigicover_RingMasterReviewPyrite follows uncaging its full punk metal roar straight away. It rips into the senses, Charlie the ringleader with her attention grabbing presence and delivery but just as potently matched by the tide of antagonistic riffs and biting rhythms. There is a touch of Boston metallers Mongrel about the song but a scent generally lost in the combative and rousing blaze.

The predator of the EP is Habitual, the song stalking the senses with its barbarous riffs and vicious rhythms as Charlie creatively and expressively vents. Every swipe is decisive, every groaning groove enslaving whilst every word escaping Charlie’s throat is empowered with spite and energy. Seriously igniting the passions, the song takes best track honours, its raw qualities and exciting prowess though still offering the potential of bigger triumphs to come as the band grows again.

Overnighter brings the EP to a close in potent style if lacking the final spark to rival those before it. Nevertheless it leaves ears more than satisfied and appetite eager for more; wiry melodies with a tinge of Avenged Sevenfold and the like to them bringing additional ingredients to embrace in the strong encounter.

The Seven EP shows that .bipolar. is really coming into their own, musically and as a force, and will surely nudge bigger spotlights towards their seriously enjoyable roar.

The Seven EP is out now digitally and on CD.

http://www.bipolarmetal.com/    https://www.facebook.com/bipolarmetal    https://twitter.com/bipolarmetal

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright