Discomister – Cool Is Dead

digi_album_RingMasterReview

In its celebration of “uncertainty, vulnerability, and authenticity”, Cool Is Dead is one of the year’s first mouth-watering surprises. From its first moments and touch, the debut album from British duo Discomister had our ears and imagination ablaze with eager intrigue, sparking lustier pleasure with each subsequent listen of its psych rock ‘n’ pop nurtured adventure.

Anticipation in a great many for the band’s first album had been sparked by a pair of limited edition 7” coloured vinyl singles over the past year, both featuring songs destined to make up part of its magnetic proposal. For us newcomers to the creative imagination of Robin Parmiter and Ian Wilson, Cool Is Dead is an unexpected pleasure which swiftly inspires captivation and an eager appetite to know more.

The York based two open up the album with the outstanding Magical, a tasty slice of feisty rock ‘n’ roll just as tempting in its mellow moments as its fiery roar. A thrust of guitar makes first contact, its squeaky grooves and rousing riffs paving the way for melodic vocals and seductive tone of bass as the song slips into calmer waters. All the while it is secretively prowling the listener though, building its drama and energy for another raw crescendo as infectious as it is raw. Vocal harmonies only add to the potency as too their lyrical dance, the track simply a riveting participation commanding treat.

Feed The Rich quickly follows with its own dynamic tempting, guitars poking at the senses as exotically nurtured melodies mingle with ears. Rhythmically also, the track anthemically picks its spot, jabbing away as it incites feet whilst vocal cries spark the spirit. Lyrically crawling over the state of education, the track is pure magnetism, hips and vocal chords as drawn as thoughts and energies in its persuasive stomp before Dissolve allows a small breather, though it too is ultimately a seriously catchy and compelling offering. A psychedelic tinge colours melodies and atmosphere within the song, its lure carrying a mix of Billy Momo and Rain Parade in its intoxication with further eighties new wave flavouring in its bolder twists.

Thoughts of Billy Momo are again inspired by next up I Am You; though only as a shade in the full melodic palette of the seriously superb slice of flaming pop while The Cool Cowboy takes the imagination on a psychedelic ride through a Doors meets The Monochrome Set theatre of suggestion and sound. Its creative lines are a shimmering, haze soaked beauty, the track glorious and as its predecessor, a proposal which if it connects with personal tastes is manna for the senses.

The gentler caress and romancing melodies of Your Faults charms ears next, its alluring minimalistic body perpetually evolving and brewing broader, stronger adventure and intensity with each of its four passing minutes. Its increasing inner fire is magnetically tempered by again inescapably catchy harmonies before it all sizzles out for the advancing revelry of Let It Roll. There is something indeterminably familiar to the song which only adds to its warm and welcoming acoustic hug, a seduction with its own emerging creative and emotional snarl only adding to the already thickly impressive character and presence of the album.

Middle Eastern spices breed another fresh trespass of the imagination in Kettle, its sultry air and exotic hues irresistible within a landscape as strange and sinister as it is beguiling. Track by track, the band and album twists the kaleidoscope of adventure and invention on offer into new designs, the track and its successor, Traitors & Saints no exception, the latter providing a blend of melody coaxed elegance and rhythmic predation in a slowly burning but increasingly bewitching incitement.

Cool Is Dead closes its journey with its title track, a radiant croon of melancholy with its own spiral of psych seeded mystery and temptation heading towards a dramatic blaze of intensity in a rousing climax. It is a gripping close to a slavery of fun and imagination, Cool Is Dead to the fore of the most enjoyable and impressive encounters in 2017 so far and though we have barely touched the closing walls of January it is hard to see that changing over the next eleven months.

Cool Is Dead is out now via Traitors & Saints Records, digitally on iTunes and on CD @ http://discomister.bigcartel.com/product/cool-is-dead-signed-cd-album-free-between-spaces-ep-download fully signed and in full colour card gatefold packaging with artwork by Rachael Burnett and coming with a FREE Digital Download of the Between Spaces EP, written  by the band during the 2016 Cool Is Dead European Tour.

https://www.facebook.com/discomister/    https://twitter.com/discomisteruk

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Heavy Temple – Chassit

heavy-temple_RingMasterReview

Listening to Chassit from US trio Heavy Temple is like staring into a fire. At the heart of both, there is a siren like lure transfixing and drawing closer attention; a physical and imagination sparking coaxing soaked in danger and magnetism as suggestive images dance in its flames. Heavy Temple’s creative pyre is an aural blaze of psych/doom with a blues fuelled roar within a fuzz loaded proposal; a dark realm sizzling with warm sonic seduction and heavy visceral trespasses on body and psyche. It is also behind a rather fine quartet of tracks making up the attention demanding Chassit.

Formed at the rear of 2012, the latest line-up of Heavy Temple sees founding member and vocalist/bassist High Priestess Nighthawk joined by guitarist Arch Bishop Barghest and drummer SirenTempestas. 2014 saw the well-received release of the band’s self-titled debut EP, a release marking the cards of a great many to the quality and potential of Heavy Temple. The current threesome have realised that promise and more with Chassit, calling on mind and spirit with its fiery and imposing furnace of sound.

Opener Key and Bone swiftly lays a raw fuzzy hand on the senses, backing it up with just as muggy scuzzy grooves as High Priestess Nighthawk’s voice melodically roars. With the weight of song and emotion packing the leviathan crawl of the rhythms, the track is as captivating as it is intrusive even when slipping into a low key oasis of intensity, that the prelude to a rousing surge of stoner inflamed rock ‘n’ roll. Built on open strands of individual prowess and craft, the song is a weighty proposition full of ravenous intent mixing searing beauty and bestial rapacity.

heavy-temple-art_RingMasterReviewThe following Ursa Machina is an even more imposing and tempestuous affair. Its doom bred heart instantly crawls over the listener yet in its air a smouldering melodic heat resonates with suggestive, devilish eroticism. That siren like comparison is no more apt than here with High Priestess Nighthawk’s tones the beacon coaxing ears from within the track’s haze lit predatory rocks. From its bewitching start, the song lumbers with a raw seductive swing, its carnivorous creative bones prowling the senses and imagination as vocals heartily croon. As with its predecessor, the song’s landscape is an evolving adventure, uncaging new energies and inventive gaits to match its fuzzily flickering canvas of sound.

Pink Glass provides sludgy throat searing liquor next, sharing intoxicating melodies and woozy grooves as bass and drums swagger with irritable intent through ears. That alone is enough to ignite the passions but only a taster as lustier reactions meet the surf rock lined lure of calm and suggestion which rises midway. As minimalistic as it is, the passage has thoughts and appetite aflame with its sultry noir lit blues croon before, from its simmer, the track flares up again, catching ablaze with scorching grooves and attitude clad bass grooves aligned to SirenTempestas’s swinging beats.

Closing track In the Court of the Bastard King is instinctive rock ‘n’ roll clad in Heavy Temple’s fervid scuzz blessed sound. The instrumental is a rousing, spirit sparking stoner/psych dripping stomp which just hits the spot on every level while providing a glorious end to an increasingly enjoyable release.

There is freshness about Heavy Temple which alone picks them out from the crowd and with their inventive craft and the heartiness of their music; they are a band destined for major attention.

Chassit is released January 27th via Van Records with its cassette version out through Tridroid Records.

https://www.facebook.com/HeavyTemple/    https://heavytemple.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Snarling from the inside; talking Threatpoint with guitarist Threatpoint Alex Olivetti

threatpoint _RingMasterReview

Scranton, Pennsylvania based, groove metallers Threatpoint are no strangers to acclaim and increasing fan support thanks to their explosive live presence and a couple of plaudit luring albums. Recently they released their third in RIP, a thrilling new step in sound, craft, and imagination from the band sure to stoke up even keener and bigger spotlights upon the band. We enjoyed a moment of guitarist Alex Olivetti’s time recently to find out more about Threatpoint, there striking new encounter and plenty more…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?   

Sure, Threatpoint is Chris James (vocals), CJ Krukowski (drums), Matt Van Fleet (bass) and myself, Alex Olivetti (guitar). The band formed in early 2012. CJ and I were in a band that had just broken up and Chris’ band at the time had just broken up as well. We knew each other for a few years since our old bands used to play together. Our bassist Matt is actually the one that told Chris we were looking for a singer, since they used to be in band together. That’s where the initial seed for the band was planted. We’ve had many line-up changes through the years and now Matt is officially a part of the band. It’s very fitting since he’s the one that pretty much put the band together and it’s great since we all knew each other prior to starting this.

So you been involved in other bands before, how have those experiences impacted, if at all, on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Yea, I played in quite a bit of bands actually; cover bands, duos, acoustic, rock, metal. I joined my first band in high school and haven’t stopped since. I think being in different bands doing different styles opened my mind up to more music outside of rock/metal and even rounded me out more as a guitar player. I’m always open to trying different musical ideas and evolving as a band and as a musician.

What inspired the band name?

We were throwing around name ideas, one idea had the word “threat” and another idea had the word “point” in it. So we just decided to combine the two. No crazy meaning behind it, just trying to come up with something cool.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We just wanted to be a heavy, honest, in-your-face metal band; which I think we’ve achieved. We like to write music that the audience, as well us, can connect to.

threatpoint _RingMasterReviewDo the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

We all still love music but I think being more seasoned with recording three full-length albums and a lot or touring helped us grow not only as a band but as people. We inspire each other, since we all have different musical tastes. We’re always looking for new bands to listen to and draw inspiration from.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?    

When we first got together I think we were just trying to find our sound and trying different ideas and seeing what sounded good, our second album Careful What You Wish For is definitely faster and more aggressive and I’d say our latest album RIP is a combination of the two. We also recorded an acoustic EP and are currently working on new material and still expanding our sound.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?   

I’d say a little of both, we’ve naturally all grown as musicians and songwriters over the years and we never want to make the same album twice. We are always looking for new influences and ideas to expand our sound.

You mentioned the wide range of inspirations among you; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?  

Yea, we all like similar bands but we all have different musical tastes from blues to death metal.  We take ideas and inspiration from many bands and combine them together.

Is there a particular process to the songwriting within the band?    

Not really, songs can spark from any ones ideas. We’ve had songs start off from guitar riffs, bass lines, drum patterns and even lyrics and a vocal melody. We all bring our ideas to the practice space and work from there. The fact that everyone in the band contributes to the writing process gives us our character and sound. We put all of our styles and influences in a blender; that’s where the Threatpoint sound comes from.

How about the lyrical side, what inspires that the most?

Our singer Chris, who writes all the lyrics, can give you a more definitive answer but overall the songs are about going through life, struggle, hope and spirituality. We try to stay positive lyrically, we make songs that are relatable to anyone for any situation they may be going through.

Can you give us some background to your latest release, RIP?art_RingMasterReview

The whole process for RIP from writing to the release was about a year and half. We wanted to expand upon what we’ve done in the past, some of the fastest songs we’ve written are on this as well as some of the most laid back tracks. We also had our friend Lauren do guest vocals on one of the songs. Thanks to our good friend Nick we just released our first music video for one of the tracks off of the album, Bury the Wicked.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.    

The overall meaning behind our latest album title, RIP(Rest In Peace), is letting go or getting rid of anything that drags you down, whether it be people, objects or just taking yourself out of any situation in life that causes distress. A couple of the tracks(RIP, Tombstones of my Enemies and Bury the Wicked) all deal with that subject specifically.

Do you enter the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?    

We like to go into the studio with songs about 80% finished, it makes the actual recording process less stressful, but we always leave room for the magic that can happen in the studio. Usually songs that are my least favorite at the beginning of the process turn out to be my favorite in the end.

 Tell us about the live side to the band?    

We all love to play live, that’s where we are in “the zone”. The songs are written with the live show in mind, we write upbeat, heavy music and are very energetic onstage. When the fans get into it, we feed off of their energy, and the vibe is unreal. I’m pouring sweat at the end of every set even if we only play a handful of songs.

threatpoint_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there still the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

We have some cool venues and some very talented bands in our area. From touring, we’ve discovered that more rural venues and places in the middle of nowhere have bigger crowds that go crazy for metal. We’ve gained some awesome followings in areas outside of our own so we make sure to return to those places whenever we get the chance.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band?    

It’s an easy tool to get your name out there, promote and connect with just about anyone. There’s a little bit of a struggle as there are so many bands nowadays so it’s a little tougher to stick out from the pack. The fact you can watch live concerts online is great but I also think that its hindered turnouts for shows in general.

A big thanks for sharing time with us Alex; anything you would like to add?

Thanks to you for the interview and helping to spread the word and thanks to anyone or everyone who has supported us in any way possible…THANK YOU. To those who haven’t checked us out go to our website and come say hi to us at a show!

Read our review of RIP @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/01/24/threatpoint-r-i-p/

http://www.threatpointofficial.com     https://www.facebook.com/threatpoint

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright