Beware! Monsters – Friend or Faux

beware-monsters-friend-or-faux-cover_RingMasterReview

An invigorating kaleidoscope of sound amid rousing creative dramatics, Friend or Faux is the debut album from British outfit Beware! Monsters. It is an encounter bred on a fusion of electro infused rock ‘n’ roll, rap, drum ‘n’ bass, and dubstep; like a fusion of Hadouken!, G.R.I.M, and Abandon All Ships but swiftly finding its own character in a provocatively fun album with a snarl in its heart and lyrical suggestiveness.

There is also a more than light touch of Semitt Falls to the Manchester band’s proposal which is no surprise as Beware! Monsters features former members of that band in guitarist Paul Kendrick and bassist Sidge Rushton. In fact vocalist Jay Kane was also one of the founders of the unpredictably inventive Semitt Falls, linking up once more with former band mates and newcomer in drummer Corentin Neyran for a new adventure in 2016. Beware! Monsters swiftly found eager appetites devouring their boisterous sound live and subsequently with Friend or Faux and its enjoyably intrusive and bold sixteen track proposal.

Book ended and broken up with ‘skits’ of evocative aural suggestion, the album starts proper with Make Wubz Not War and a deliciously heavy bassline with funk in its heart. As electronic and guitar cast essences attach themselves, the irresistible coaxing leads ears into a lively stroll abound with rock bred devilment and electro enterprise. With Kane’s rapping an equally persuasive motion in the thrilling scheme of things, the song sparks thoughts of previously mentioned Londoners Hadouken! and fellow Mancunians G.R.I.M but as also suggested earlier shows plenty to forge its own identity.

A mightily anthemic trespass on body and imagination, the great start continues with Truth, a milder mannered encounter sound wise but with a bite to its words and an underlying defiance to its intent as melodies seduce and rhythms bounce. Rushton’s bass again is an imposing treat more than matched by the frantic urges of the electronic antics around it and Neyran’s tenacious beats.

A wonderful nagging quality is shared by Kendrick’s guitar in the following Higher, its riffs and grooves a magnetic persistence supported by funk fuelled rhythms and an instinctive catchiness brewed in quick time by the aligning of individual revelry. With a touch of Axis Mundi to its body, the fiercely enjoyable track is followed and eclipsed by Beware of the Monsters, a pop rock scented affair with classical strains in its melodic endeavour and rapacity to its captivation loaded rock ‘n’ roll; it ultimately a resourceful carnival with the snappy raps of Kane as its side show barker.

The brief Project Dystopia is a similarly alluring affair at ease either snarling or roaming through ears in a reggae graced haze before making way for the punchy dynamics of A Long Way From Home, a track epitomising the album in the diversity of styles and textures employed in its imaginative carousel. Though it lacks the same spark as its predecessors for personal ears, the song is a compelling and skilfully woven proposition before the short almost gothic lure of In Ravens We Trust pulls intrigue into the waiting drama of We Are The 48. The track is another rock heavy slice of goodness with a predatory edge to its rhythms and vocals amidst the entwining of fiery grooves and smouldering melodies.

The Messengers of Deception rumbles and grumbles next without skimping on veins of seductive melodic enticement and its own distinct web of rousing creative espionage while No False Idol smoulders around another earthy bassline as an Enter Shikari meets Electric Six escapade blossoms into something fiercely unique and explosive to Beware! Monsters.

The cosmic toned A Revolution in Progress stirs the senses and emotions next, its intimate yet worldly challenge a tempestuous blend of rock and metal as at ease gently caressing involvement as forcibly stirring it up, all with a craft and invention which sets another certain highlight within Friend or Faux.

Closing with The Haunting is Over, a short evocative instrumental, Friend or Faux is one of those striking debuts which lingers in ears and thoughts long pass its presence. Certainly some tracks surpass others but from its first eventful second through to its suggestive last, the album is an impressive introduction to a band already outshining its member’s previous successes.

Friend or Faux is out now @ https://bewaremonsters.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/bewaremonstersuk/

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ventenner – Invidia

Ensuring 2017 gets off to a powerful start, UK’s Ventenner are poised to release their new album; an encounter which from start to finish rapaciously devours ears and imagination. Increasingly irresistible with every passing slice of alternative metal, rock, and industrially infused electronic involvement, Invidia is the natural yet inventively bold offspring of the band’s previous successes across. When giving us the heads up last year about the forthcoming encounter, band founder Charlie Dawe (vocals/synth) suggested that “This one is set to be a lot heavier, more powerful and a superior record!” It needs little time and barely one listen to confirm his hopes and assessment are right on the money.

Variety and imagination has never been lacking in the Ventenner sound as evidenced by previous albums This Is The Reason of 2012 and the acclaimed Distorture two years later. Power and forceful enterprise has never been absent in the band’s music either since emerging initially as a solo project for Dawe in 2007. Ventenner’s last album alone was an encounter leaving “the senses beleaguered and imagination ablaze from start to finish”, its emotionally raw dystopian soundscapes seductive and compelling but indeed Invidia while embracing similar qualities taps into an almost primal yet involved intensity and abrasive energy which consumes the listener.

Produced by Esoteric vocalist/guitarist Greg Chandler, Invidia also unveils the most intricate tapestries of sound from the London based outfit yet starting with opener The Start Is The End. A synth resonates in ears first, it’s coaxing swiftly joined by the prowling tones of Dawe with restrained but striking rhythms alongside. As riffs and hooks bring their invention to the mix, the song breeds a Nine Inch Nails scented predation; exotic hues lining an emerging melodic suggestiveness within a controlled yet tempestuous proposal. Throughout, the song’s character is intrusive and raw yet magnetically infectious, traits blossoming throughout the album.

cover-art_RingMasterReviewBreak In Two reinforces the release’s impressive start, its resourceful entrance calmer yet just as instinctively invasive as its predecessor’s as a Gravity Kills meets Celldweller air grows and colludes with Ventenner’s openly distinct imagination. A gorgeous melodic hook caps off a mighty temptation, its prowess and potency matched by the sinister charm and emotive fire of next up Saligia. Almost devious in its weave of flirtatious melodies and sonic causticity, the song is pure addiction as industrial metal and electro punk merge for a hauntingly irritable raid on the senses.

A superb and masterfully woven conflict of textures makes up Enemy next, an outpouring of beauty and the beast sound and creativity lined not for the first or last time within Invidia by a Pitchshifter like essence while next up Be Still brings fresh crabbiness to ears as Ventenner again confirm their expertise at aligning melodic elegance and bordering on hostile emotional and musical tetchiness.

The former of the essences is embraced primarily by the bewitching Only The Empty Remain, though it too has a disgruntled undercurrent which erupts throughout before Circle while carrying a touch of Society One to itself, roars commandingly, making its mere two minutes another of the most powerful and essential moments within Invidia.

Dividing Seed just as enjoyably hits the spot, its web of guitar and synth intrusiveness as disarmingly seductive as it is cholerically bracing; essences further inventively twisted by successor Bruxism. A bear of a song with bone shuddering beats and senses binding vines of sonic invention around the emotional challenge of Dawe’s vocals and words, the track is sheer power but tempered by the disarming flow of melodic grace and harmonic beauty which breaks through the October File spiced tempest.

A predatory air is cast by Anamnesis, a trespass captivatingly countered by the reflective melodies and warm textures blossoming in voice and sound. Like two souls in dispute yet eager union, the track adds to the pinnacles of the release before being instantly matched by the imagination gripping landscape of closing track Omega. Its melancholic beauty immerses ears and thoughts in a haunting almost spatial flight accentuated by Dawe’s transfixing tones in a temptation which alone urges a swift return to the roar of the album.

Distorture impressed two years ago but has been easily eclipsed by Invidia, already one of this year’s important highlights. In many ways the Ventenner sound has come of age yet it is easy to still feel there is plenty more for they and us to discover.

Invidia is released via Hibernacula Records 20th January on CD and also digitally and on vinyl through http://www.ventenner.com/store

http://www.ventenner.com/

https://twitter.com/ventenner   https://www.facebook.com/Ventenner/

Pete RingMaster 10/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Black Clouds – After All

TBC_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2004, US rockers The Black Clouds has pretty much persistently and increasingly drawn attention and acclaim with their hearty rock ‘n’ roll, a trend set to be accelerated by the release of new album After All. A fiery yet earthy slab of alternative rock lying somewhere between Foo Fighters and Stone Temple Pilots, the album has all the attributes to become a long term passion for a great many.

Hailing from Monmouth County, New Jersey, The Black Clouds consists of vocalist/guitarist Dan Matthews, guitarist Neil Hayes, bassist Gary Moses, and drummer Cory King. The punkish roar of 2008 debut album Wishing Well set the band up potently in regard to praise and broadening awareness, its adventure and success surpassed by Better Days four years later. A feisty fusion of grunge and hard rock, its impressive elements have been joined by those of its predecessor in the striking attack of After All, a rousing fusion of the familiar with new bold enterprise in an exploit which could and should push The Black Clouds towards a position on the global rock ‘n’ roll map.

Produced by Jack Endino (Nirvana, Mudhoney, Soundgarden), After All immediately hits the spot with opener Photograph. As riffs and rhythms collude alongside a spicy groove the song quickly captures ears and imagination, Matthews’ vocals are just as swift a lure as the song heads into a chorus gripping listener participation with instant ease. There is no escaping a Nirvana-esque hue to the track’s persuasion but neither the all tenacious Black Clouds freshness as it stirs up imagination and appetite with anthemic prowess.

The following Self Control has a slightly more laid back charge to its presence but too freely uncages piercing hooks and an instinctive snarl to keep the album’s strong start going. Backing vocals potently compliment Matthew’s plaintive tones as the song strolls with controlled vigour, the song reminding a little of UK band Feud, before Sayonara steps forward.  From its initial bass growl, the song is a volcanic, punk infested trespass. Raw and intrusive with a fine line in melodic contrasts, lava like grooves, and virulent infectiousness, its briefness is the only anti-climax in an impressive assault.

art_RingMasterReview Leave Her Alone brings a calmer presence to After All next; its body just as catchy with broiling eruptions of intensity adding richer texture to its character while Falling straight after seduces with melodic and harmonic charm. Even in its emotive caress there is an underlying rigour which bolsters the song’s already strong temptation; both tracks revealing the enjoyable variation in the band’s album and sound.

Featuring Mark Arm and Jack Endino, Vice bares its sonic teeth and raw energy next, the song a dirty rock ‘n’ roll grumble carrying the punk attitude of Johnny Thunders aligned to the sonic flames of Dinosaur Jr., before Going Going Gone, with again Endino guesting, dons another Nirvana like colour in its contagious holler. Creating another twist in the album’s landscape, the pair of tracks cements the already memorable presence of After All with the excellent Still Alive reinforcing that success with its grunge/punk ferocity. Rhythmically the track gets under skin scorched by scalding grooves and melodic flames cast by Hayes, traits matched across much of the release as a whole.

The gentler duo of Merchants Of Death and Days Are So Long, the latter seeing Endino, Allison Maryatt, Eric Nutting, and Nate Malubay helping out, bring After All to an enjoyable close if without either quite finding the same sparks to ignite personal tastes as earlier tracks. Nevertheless, the grunge infection of the former and melodic elegance of the equally catchy final track, leave satisfaction high and a want for more bold.

The Black Clouds are at the point in their rise where they are teetering on the broadest recognition, After All looking and sounding like the nudge to see them topple into the biggest spotlights.

After All is out now through Capacitor Records on CD and translucent blue vinyl @ https://capacitorrecords.com/products/black-clouds-after-all

http://www.theblackclouds.com/   https://www.facebook.com/blackcloudsofficial/

Pete RingMaster 10/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright