The Cavemen – Born To Hate

TC_RingMasterReview

It did not take the release of recent single Too High To Die/I’d Kill to stir up eager anticipation for the new album from The Cavemen, that instinct bred by the band’s debut album last year, but it certainly added to the energy of the lustful welcome offered to Born To Hate. Native New Zealanders now UK based within the “grimy streets of London”, The Cavemen is one of those proposals you naturally take to or not, but for raw and uncompromising spirit stirring rock ‘n’ roll, the quartet’s punk driven garage rock takes some beating.

That previously mentioned single suggested a new primal ferocity and trashy tenacity had been bred in the band’s sound, a lascivious urgency which again fuels Born To Hate. In many ways the release is a continuation of The Cavemen’s self-titled debut album; more of the same lo-fi devilry but with this fresh impetus of sonic corruption, the band breaches a new plateau in their salaciously dirty rock ‘n’ roll.

Savage is the first assault on ears, its blues scented impurity a swift involvement of ears and appetite as sixties garage rock puts on its punk pants for a stomping trespass driven by the rhythmic slaps of drummer Jake and the moody bassline of Nick. As with most songs from the band to date, involvement with feet and vocal chords is swift and full, its ease of persuasion just a warm up for the joys to come as I’m A Mess swoops in straight after. A teasing spicy hook starts things rolling, its inescapable lure soon backed by tenacious rhythms and the scuzzy enterprise of guitarist Jack, in turn his great unpolished vocal backing to the punk attitude bred delivery of front man Paul creating a rousing union hard to resist.

swamp-cover_RingMasterReviewI Hate Art romps in next, its raucous hook littered confrontation assaulting and exciting like a fusion of The Sonics and Eddie and The Hot Rods and quickly in control of hips and feet whilst stirring up a litter of trouble before Satan Is Her Name stalks ears and imagination with the same trashy deviancy and demonic wantonness as bound in its centre of attention. Fair to say floorboards bounce when the song is around, its infectiousness enslaving and instantly matched by that uncaged by the corrosive sixties pop bawdiness of In Love With You complete with eagerly chopping riffs and fab four inspired howls.

There is a taste of Motorhead to next up Speed Of Death, its harsh ferocity and virulent antagonism as catchy as anything taunting from within Born To Hate while showing a broader diversity within the familiar Cavemen sound. That variety continues across the album as songs like I Hope They Drop The Bomb On Me bullies and flirts with its sonically befouling seventies punk/power pop inspired antagonism and straight after the crazed punk ‘n’ roll of Ain’t My Baby ignites an even greedier reaction and union between listener and release.

The band drops down a gear for the excellent Dead To Me, its meaty croon though still loaded with muscular energy as it strolls rabidly through ears with its psychobilly laced garage rock before Nasty Girl Nasty Boy whips up the passions all over again with its The Pirates meets The Flys romp. Pure rock ‘n’ roll in its most primordial punk breeding, the track is irresistible; a certain pinnacle though closely chased throughout the album by songs like the psychotic UK Subs coloured C.H.A.R.L.I.E. and the ever glorious I’d Kill (To See You Dead). One of the tracks on the last single, it is a belligerent nagging of the senses carrying a great groan of The Saints and The Lurkers to its grouchy contagion.

Born To Hate is completed by the persistent fingering of Why Won’t You; a song as seventies pop glam as it is punk in its sonically ravaged way, and an inescapable infection to bring a thrilling release to a boisterously rousing close. The band’s songs might and will draw comparisons to others at certain times but every flavour is devoured, twisted, than corrupted again until emerging as part of a riot unique to The Cavemen and right here helping create an album which simply leads you into dirty habits.

Born To Hate is available via Dirty Water Records at https://thecavemennz.bandcamp.com/album/born-to-hate  and http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Cavemen/c/18119001/offset=0&sort=normal

 

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Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tirade – Self-Titled EP

tirade_RingMasterReview

With its virulent pop swing, it is hard to say that the Tirade sound lives up to the fierce tone of the band’s name, but certainly it makes a sizeable, attention grabbing impact going by their richly enjoyable debut EP.  Consisting of seven eventful and resourceful tracks, the self-titled release is a feisty and bubbling fusion of alternative rock and pop punk which employs familiar strains and textures in something potently fresh and increasingly enjoyable.

Hailing from Manchester, the quartet of lead vocalist/bassist Jake Tilley, vocalists/guitarists Josh Pearl and Alex Young, and drummer Stevo Somerset draw on inspirations ranging from Lower Than Atlantis, Press To Meco, and Don Broco to We Are Carnivores and Reuben for their praise luring sound and songs. Formed last year, Tirade are becoming the eager whisper on an ever growing wave of lips, a secret we expect soon becoming an open and loud shout as their EP nudges national awareness.

With moments of really striking moments, the EP is a consistently enjoyable encounter opening up with a band. Snakes and Social Ladders quickly has ears and appetite engaged as jabbing beats and nagging riffs collude. Soon the song is boldly romping, springing sonic intrigue and tasty hooks all the while across its body. It does hold its full energy in relative restraint, turning it into a gripping infectiousness as the guitars create a repertoire of sinewy, melodically endowed enterprise further coloured by Tilley’s impressive vocals and equally strong harmonies.

tirade-tirade-front-cover_RingMasterReviewThe great start is soon eclipsed by the following theatre of Punch?, a song which is as unpredictable as it is catchy. From its first breath sing-a-long vocals unite with sonic espionage as the guitars twist and turn with technical revelry and math rock spiced invention. The rhythms of Tilly and Somerset drive the song relentlessly, adding to its infection as the imagination of the band, not always as forceful elsewhere, has a field day.

Knives In Your Eyes entangles ears in another flavoursome hook within seconds, its spice surrounded by fiery suggestiveness before the song settles into a calmer stroll expelling that initial heated drama throughout. As with the last song, there are essences which spark thoughts of Swound!, a spiky invention aligned to the melodic prowess of Jimmy Eat World/ Lower Than Atlantis. From start to finish, the track hits the spot with ease as too its successor We’re Having Fun. As rhythms punch, harmonies shine with a trio of voices that blend perfectly across another slice of real catchiness. Even with its contagious instincts though, there is a bite to the Tirade sound, a creative snarl as bold as anything within this tenaciously captivating stomp of a song.

For personal tastes, the sparks which help its previous songs spark a lusty appetite for the release are less prominent from hereon in upon the EP though there is no doubting the appeal and enjoyment found in Travel Agent for Guilt Trips and the following, increasingly compelling Optimism. Again both tracks are a marriage of thumping rhythms and harmonic warmth bound in ear pleasing dynamics but lacking the stronger inventiveness and snap of their predecessors.

The EP concludes with The World Isn’t On Your Side, another highlight closing the release as impressively and raucously as Snakes and Social Ladders opened it. Cantankerously bold, the outstanding track is the heaviest moment of the release, almost predacious as Tirade reveals another string to their creative bow.

It is hard not to think Tirade as a band on a certain rise after this fine release, and once the potential shown here is realised as something truly distinct and unique in sound and songwriting, that loud whisper just might become a raging roar.

The Tirade EP is out now @ https://tiradeuk.bandcamp.com/album/tirade

https://www.facebook.com/TIRADEbanduk    https://twitter.com/tiradeband?lang=en-gb

Check out the video for We’re Having Fun @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/video-selector/

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

From Rust – Lost Sense Of Life

from-rust-online-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

British metalcore outfit From Rust have just unleashed debut EP Lost Sense Of Life, a release which makes up for what it lacks in real surprises by breeding an attention luring character bound in a ferocious tempest of sound.  Fair to say it is a promising, potential loaded introduction to the Somerset hailing quintet which has installed itself as one of our current persistent listens.

Created in 2014 by long-time friends, vocalist Jake Searle and lead guitarist Camden Gibson, From Rust has taken their time to emerge. With a line-up finally completed by rhythms guitarist Tom Waters, bassist Sam Elswood, and drummer Sam Kellaway, the band spent numerous months creating and honing their sound, its raw and pungent creative roar making a potent impact once the band hit the live stage towards the end of 2015. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Despite My Deepest Fear, Thrones, Values, and Materia while hitting the studio earlier this year to uncage the fury fuelled Lost Sense Of Life.

Inspirations to the band are said to include bands such as Parkway Drive, Northlane, and All That Remains; essences which do not hide within the EP and opener Whispers but it is fair to say adds to the storm rather than drives it. The first track coaxes with a fiery groove initially as rhythms and riffs collect in the background before consuming the senses and shaping the blossoming assault. They align to rather than devour that initial enterprise, melodic flames and scything sonic spears joining the potent ire and variety in Searle’s vocal trespass. As atmospheric throughout as it is venomously fierce and relentlessly vicious, the track is a strong and engaging start but soon outshone by its successor.

from-rust-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewInside Out is superb, from the sonic web slung out there by the guitars at the start exposing itself as a ravenous beast of raw and inventive temptation which burrows itself into the imagination and psyche. There is a swagger to that initial tapestry of guitar matched in the prowling beats and threat loaded bassline of Elswood; all luring and baiting the senses before entangling in a rabid onslaught. Twisting through those varied attacks and more across its inventive body, suggestive intrigue soaked melodies and varied metal strains circling ears, the track grips and enthrals taking best track honours whilst uncapping the potential of real uniqueness within the band to hopefully emerge ahead.

If the previous track is predatory, Predictable Pain is bestial as it stalks the listener, all the time jabbing away with its salacious rhythms as guitars and bass weave a mercurial tapestry of sound and imposing emotion further shaped by the raw throated intrusions of Searle. With senses wilting breakdowns and rapacious vocal squalls within the net of sonic enterprise, the track is certainly a centre of attention if lacking the final elements which ignites its predecessor and indeed the following Grey World. With Searle using his range of attacks, to great effect, the track is a cancerous yet infectious abuse cast with an invention and imaginative boldness hinting at greater things ahead as the band develops in sound and songwriting.

Final track Gone Forever is just as intensive and enjoyable, epitomising the release in many ways as recognisable essences are embraced by the band own keen invention and readiness to be bold and try to be different. It is that element which really helps Lost Sense Of Life command the senses and suggests that once From Rust really go for it, they could be one of those taking British metal boldly forward.

Lost Sense Of Life is out now on iTunes.

https://twitter.com/fromrustoffical    https://www.facebook.com/fromrust/

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Scott Swain – Oil!

scott-swain_RingMasterReview

By his own words, “This track is what you get when you cross the film There Will Be Blood with Johnny Cash“. That description sums up Oil!, the new single from Scott Swain perfectly; its flavouring and emotive atmosphere encapsulated in those few words and living up to hopes equally raised by such a suggestion. The song is a swarthy slice of melodic rock within a country/mariachi spiced cinematic climate of suggestiveness which swiftly captures attention and imagination.

Having played in bands for almost a decade, supporting Biffy Clyro among the highlights, Swain decided to explore his solo side when his main bands, How to Dress a Monster and Fire at Night, took breathers earlier this year. Drawing on inspirations ranging from Elliot Smith and Mark Lanagan to cult cinema, he soon ventured onto the live scene with just his voice and acoustic guitar. As Oil! shows, in the studio Swain expands his sound and emotive adventure with the help of others but without losing that organic raw character and texture luring increasing praise.

Inspired by There Will be Blood, with Swain lyrically examining “the relationship between wanting to be ambitious and the things which can be sacrificed in the process”, Oil! is a natural seduction of ears and thought. From its first melodic strum and metronomic lure of beats it has ears gripped, ambling in with purpose before hitting an even eager stride as guitars and bass unite around warm harmonies. The country kissed twang of guitar and melodies hold a myriad of pictures for the imagination to conjure while feet and hips are employed by the gentle but keen swagger of the infection loaded song and its lively gait.

Managing to smoulder in emotion and atmosphere while providing a tenacious canter to get involved in, the song is pure magnetism which lingers long after taking its leave and increasingly impresses with subsequent listens.

Oil! is out now via iTunes, Spotify etc.

Upcoming Live Dates:

06.12.2016 Apples and Pear Bar, Brick Lane. London

14.12.2016 Fu Manchu Bar, Clapham. London.

22.12.2016 The Bricklayers, Hitchin.

http://scottswainmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/scottswainmusic

https://twitter.com/scottswainmusic

Check out the video for Hitman from Scott Swain @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/video-selector/

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright