The Simpletone – Angels’ Share

the-simpletone-band-pic_RingMasterReview

There are some releases which just demand success. Whether they get it in the increasingly fickle attention of the modern music fan is never a given but Angels’ Share, the new album from British rockers The Simpletone, does all the right things to make that commanding statement.

There is little we can share about the 2010 formed band other than its line-up is made up of John Davison, Craig Seymour, Glenn Eastoe, and Tom Cahill, it hails from St Neots in Cambridgshire, and has previously released the albums, Rampenny in 2012 and Dark Matter two years later, both seemingly well-received propositions. A UK tour with New Model Army in 2014 has been one of many live highlights for the band built on their stirring fusion of heavy and melodic rock with grunge, stoner and numerous other essences. It is a mix of flavours making for a striking proposition and imaginative proposal in Angels’ Share and songs which just roar with anthemic majesty and fiery enterprise.

The first of the ten cuts gripping ears and an early appetite for the band’s invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is Outta Control. Instantly a spicy groove winds around ears, leaning in closer as tenacious rhythms and riffs join its opening bait. Effect coated vocals equally lures keen ears as the song swaggers along with steady but rapacious grooves and a suggestive melody. The restraint stopping the track from exploding as it hints it might throughout is an inspired move, the song teasing and almost taunting along its enterprise shaped body. The heavier throb of bass and flames of harmonies only add to the lure of the song with guitar craft similarly as magnetic.

The following Love Street (Modern Mystery) keeps the rich enticement going with its punk folk lined stroll, simple but potent riffs colluding with swinging beats as vocals paint a suggestive picture. Its catchiness is a swift persuasion rapidly backed by the boisterous antics of the guitars as the track carries on the great variety already showing in the band’s sound, diversity more than confirmed by their mighty new single Storm Chaser. At over eleven minutes it is an epic persuasion which serenades the senses with melodic and harmonic caresses initially before building a bolder energy amidst an addictive rhythmic prowess. Weaving strands of space and progressive rock among other textures into its ever evolving adventure, the song is a kaleidoscope of melody heavy rock drawing on an array of decades while creating its own fresh, individual, and ever changing landscape of imagination. Like a mix of Skyscraper (the nineties UK band), Life of Agony, and Voyager, the track barely feels like its length and relentlessly has the listener compelled.

angels-share-cover_RingMasterReviewThe fact that next up Black Box still manages to eclipse it slightly shows the quality of its own exceptional design. A spirit stoking beast from its first touch, the song canters with muscular tenacity and fiery invention bred to virulent proportions as its mix of hard and heavy rock consumes ears and imagination. The track is exceptional, as punk in many ways as it is feisty rock ‘n’ roll with a drama of character and craft that demands attention and involvement.

Fire in the Sky steps up next with a growl in its basslines and a contagious swing in its rhythms, guitars and vocals dancing within their addictive tempting as soulful blues lined grooves bring an incendiary heat to the proposal. Like a seventies inspired union of Therapy? and Reuben, to try and offer a comparison, the song forcibly hits the spot before making way for the slower stoner-esque prowl of Nehemiah, an incitement pulling sludgy textures into its increasingly exotic and suggestive theatre. It is seriously compelling stuff, another song blossoming through an array of twists and flavours as it grows in ears.

The melodic charm of Day by Day is a similarly riveting proposition, the graceful yet sinewy instrumental finding a place between XTC and Tool as it seduces the imagination, setting it up for electrified air and nature of As Above so Below. Courting ears with a rapaciously formidable core in its raw riffs and bold rhythmic, the track wraps it in a melodic spiciness and mellower harmonic seducing which echoes elements of bands like Bush, Alice In Chains, and Sick Puppies yet sounds little like any.

If we tell you that Easy Come lacks the same galvanic sparks of its predecessors do not mistake it for a weak link within Angels’ Share; the song a highly persuasive slice of rock ‘n’ roll with guitar craft which shines like a beacon as the bass uncages a funk inspired personality. The fact the track is outshone by others is down to their might, a strength revelled in again by album closer Hunters. Whether by coincidence or design, there is a Horslips feel to the song certainly early on, and of fellow Brits KingBathmat but as across the album, things are soon woven into an addiction of sound and creative hooks roaring The Simpletone.

It is a glorious end to one treat of a release which deserves all the praise and attention it should and surely will get. Angels’ Share is another rousing encounter to add to our lustful favourites of 2016 list and no keener a recommendation we can offer.

Angels’ Share is out now across most online stores and on iTunes @ https://itunes.apple.com/album/id1169473074?ls=1&app=itunes

http://www.thesimpletone.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesimpletoneband/

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Finding Kate – If I Fall

finding-kate-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

With eager praise surrounding debut EP Inside Out, British melodic rockers Finding Kate are now pushing for wider recognition with their first album and fair to say that If I Fall is twelve tracks of melancholy soaked and emotionally powerful rock which just demands attention.

The brainchild and creative outlet of alt-rock vocalist/lyricist Kate Pavli, her London hailing project has earned a potent reputation for its live presence to match that earned by that first EP. Linking up with pianist Chris Charalambides who wrote all the music for the album and a host of additional contributors to If I Fall, Kate is ready to tap into bigger spotlights with a release which ripples with skilful songwriting and strongly enterprising sounds.

Influences listed include Deftones, Flyleaf, Avril Lavigne, Karnivool, The Pretty Reckless, and Evanescence and there is no escaping a comparison to certainly the latter for the Finding Kate sound though you can add Forever Still like essences also helping shape the band’s potent first full-length. If I Fall opens up with the swiftly impressive Drowning, a track soon luring ears and appetite into its imaginative landscape. Little time is needed either to embrace the emotional fuelled voice of Kate, her presence and qualities catching eager attention  within seconds of her opening melodic cries. As often common to the album’s character, the song is a fiery simmering of intensity, an emotional cauldron which ignites from time to time but seduces rather than blazes within ears as guitars and keys especially echo the drama of Kate’s vocals.

White Lies follows the strong start, opening up with a rhythmically feistier coaxing which shapes its subsequent infectious character and energy. As with the first, there is something familiar about the song drawing those comparisons earlier mentioned yet both tracks develop a personality of sound and invention built on the potential of uniqueness.

finding-kate-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewNew single, Forever is next, its sombre breath and emotional intimacy bred from the alluring voice of Kate and the plaintively shadowed melodies of Chris’ piano alone; their potency backed by the expansive suggestiveness of guitars and strings as rhythms court a darker climate. It is equally a template behind the emotive theatre of next up Don’t Let Go which is taken to even more intimate depths as Kate’s voice flames across another enticing tapestry of flavours and textures. As strong as its predecessor was, the track easily eclipses it.

Both Get Over You and Inside Out leave ears richly satisfied, the first creating another fiery landscape of sound and heart felt declaration matched by the second in its imagination seducing web of sounds and invention. Strings again add a sublime texture and presence to both songs, especially the former while its successor enthrals through that unpredictable and mouth-watering array of invention. It makes a great claim for best song honours within the album though quickly rivalled by Did It Again with its cinematic stringed beauty and the melancholic union of keys and voice.

Through the album’s dynamic yet tender title track and the magnetically sorrowful yet hope lit I’ll Save You, band and release only cement their hold on attention while Semper Fi explores arguably the album’s most adventurous creative scenery in its impassioned roar. It is fair to say there is a bit of a surface similarity which wraps many of the songs within If I Fall, though digging deeper frequently reveals a kaleidoscope of real individual imagination, but this track is an openly unique proposal to stir ears and enjoyment.

The dark vocal/piano romance building It’s Over captivates from its first breath and note straight after; a beguiling ballad hard to be anything but taken with before Gone brings the album to a fine and memorable close with its emotion soaked roar which pleasures with ease.

If I Fall shows that Finding Kate may have yet to find a truly distinct voice in their sound but the potential is a loud promise within their first album and its enjoyment rather easy to find.

If You Fall is released November 18th with pre-orders now taken @ https://findingkate.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.findingkatemusic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/FindingKate    https://twitter.com/FindingKate_

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright