Into the Storm – Where the Merfalo Roam

Photo by Ken Lapworth (2015)

Photo by Ken Lapworth (2015)

Into the Storm is a band which gate-crashes your senses with a sound as savagely compelling as it is venomously intrusive. It is equally a proposal layered with an enterprise which ensures releases like the Seattle quartet’s new album, Where the Merfalo Roam, steals the imagination and defiles the psyche with ease.

Consisting of the band’s most adventurous and expansive tracks yet, Where the Merfalo Roam is an exploration or should that be fall into an abyss of “discontent, oppressive governments, dystopian eras, and the connection between the cycles societies go through.” A tar thick assault of sludge/doom rapacity unafraid to venture into bolder and starkly diverse strains of sound, the album is as openly inventive in its complexities as it is uncompromising in its raw animosity.

Produced, engineered, and mixed by Derek Moree, Where the Merfalo Roam opens with Truck Van Trailer, instantly trespassing ears with a dirty melody which subsequently ignites a barrage of bestial riffs and ravenous rhythms; yet there is a swing to them which tempers the violence and invites closer involvement. Dirt encrusted vocals bring their ire to the challenge just as quickly, scowling within the sonic and melodic toxicity cast by the guitars of Brant Kay and Matt Jahn and pure predacious ferocity sprung by bassist Oliver Reeves and drummer James Reeves. Becoming even more absorbing as the band break out a Cajun flavouring towards its end, the track is a mighty and riveting start swiftly matched across following tempests.

Ghostmaker is next, prowling the senses with ursine irritability and weight. A bruising punkiness adds to the track’s imposing weight and intensity reminding a touch of Pigs as it stalks and consumes as one primal entity yet reveals a tide of individually effective elements and textures. Its relentless tirade is contrasted by the doom lumbering of Seduced and Disappointed, a black melancholy again stalking the senses but in a slow, light vanquishing mass still prone to rabid eruptions. The two tracks show the variety fuelling the corrosive heart of the album, a diversity continuing within the torment ridden I Gotta Get the Bees Outta My Teeth and the bewitching unrest of Wellwisher. The first of the two sonically niggles and rhythmically pounds, combining both with emotional and multiple vocal antipathy as piercing guitars weave a web of captivating tension while the second is a melodic seduction around an emotional turbulence shared through the rasping angst of the vocals. The simmering beauty eventually boils up into a plaintive lava-esque squall with melodies still suggestively captivating as tempestuousness blossoms around them.

its-where-the-merfalo-roam_RingMasterReviewFeaturing the guest talent of trumpeter Alexis Tahiri, the following Maturin ignites appetite and imagination further. Starting out as a beguiling flame of Mariachi spiced sultriness, the track smoulders, feistily simmers, and eventually steps aside for a barbarous immersion of ears and spirit. Even then melodic suggestiveness is a heady incitement as rhythmic bad blood invades, the song leaving no minute short of unexpected and riveting drama; a weave just as potent within the cancerous air and emotion of Maths. Somehow the track manages to be mesmeric too, haunting the psyche as it defiles the senses and stirs the imagination.

Fell Off A Horse is next unleashing a few seconds over a minute of rabid punk rifled bitterness before Jobbernaught tantalises with inviting melodies and catchy rhythms on its way to infesting ears with its own emotional and sonic malignity. Both tracks leave pleasure thick and the soul blackened and prime for the closing brutal rock ‘n’ roll of the album’s title track. Where the Merfalo Roam strolls in with a vendetta to its swagger and open infectiousness to its enterprise even when turning into slow, psyche winding incursions upon body and emotion. With violinists Kim Pack and Sarah Pendleton bringing melancholic grace and beauty to the song’s emerging and all-consuming emotional and sonic volcanic storm, the track is sheer magnetism; a mighty end to a similarly impressive release.

Where The Merfalo Roam punishes as it rewards, withering body and emotions as it invigorates them. It is not going to be for everyone but for invasive sludge/doom/hardcore hearts, it is a must.

Where The Merfalo Roam is released November 11th via Alive and Breathing Records and @ https://intothestorm.bandcamp.com/album/where-the-merfalo-roam

https://www.facebook.com/rideintothestorm/   https://twitter.com/intothestorms   http://rideintothestorm.nfshost.com/

Pete RingMaster 09/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Eyes Wide Shot – Back From Hell

EWS_RingMasterReview

Part of any success is down to grabbing attention and that is a quality the new album from French outfit Eyes Wide Shot certainly has. It offers a dynamic and rousing blend of alternative metal and melodic rock with many other varied strains involved too. Uniqueness is maybe a less obvious essence to Back From Hell but it and its ten captivating songs just grab ears and imagination leaving thick enjoyment behind.

Hailing from Jarny in the north-east of France and formed at the beginning of 2013, Eyes Wide Shot released their debut EP in their first year which helped firmly establish them in the local music scene. The following year saw the current line-up settled when drummer Anthony Marra linked up with vocalist Florent Curatola and guitarists Nicolas Menus and Kevin Guernane, further expanded since recording the album by bassist Jeremy Machado. Soon after Marra’s addition, the band came to the attention of producer Charles Kallaghan Massabo (Falling In Reverse) who subsequently flew to Los Angeles to record their debut album with them.

Back From Hell quickly commands ears and thoughts as its themes of life’s setbacks and obstacles, its manipulations and addictions, shadow songs which leap from the speakers with energy and enterprise. Heavy rhythms and hungry riffs collude with electronic revelry throughout; that mentioned fusion of rock and metal familiar yet unpredictable and ultimately always intriguing.

It all starts with Waiting In Vain and an instant confrontation of imposing sound and niggling riffs. Soon hitting a formidable stride still leaning heavily upon ears, the song lightens slightly for the potent tones of Curatola, his entrance aligned to inviting melodies and an infectiousness which lines every aspect of the proposition awakening ears. With an element of bands like Avenged Sevenfold to it, the anthemic roar of the track is a convincing persuasion as melodically imaginative as it is aggressively biting.

Cover_RingMasterReviewThe following A Glimpse Of Me is a similarly textured offering, riffs and grooves a rapacious proposal with rhythms an even more irritable aggressor. Their attack though is tempered by the catchy prowess of vocals and harmonies and the warm melodies wrapping their proposal. Together it is an engaging invitation easy to get involved in as too that of My Redemption which initially seems very similar to its predecessor but soon shows a potent vein of electronic twists and anthemic tenacity in a body which wakes easy participation but keeps the imagination busy with its varied flavours from djent and technical metal to alternative and electro rock.

It is an excellent highlight within Back From Hell quickly emulated by the fiery smoulder of Lost For You, a track which simmers with a volatility given its head in a chorus which blazes without exploding. Its melancholic calms and melodic mists only add to the song’s beguiling presence though, a success in turn breached by both Lisp Off My Lips and the album’s title track. The first of the pair is another which may not have major originality on its side yet from its first moments to its last and especially in a chorus which seduces the passions, the increasingly tempestuous song creates a fixed bond with pleasure. Its successor shares crystalline electronic melodies as riffs grumble, slipping into mellow reflection before brewing an emotional intensity which in turn sparks a contagious swing to the song’s gait. It is a real grower becoming another big moment in the album over listens.

Another pinnacle to Back From Hell is the virulently catchy Under The Knife, a song which hits like an old friend and has body and voice enlisted in mere moments of its inescapable arousal. Melodic metal and rock in rampant collusion, the track is a boisterously fiery and anthemic encounter impregnated with suggestive tendrils of melody rich enterprise.

Both Living The Dream with its underling irritable volatility beneath emotive flames and the poppy aggression of See What I’ve Seen pile on the enjoyment, the second especially tempting before Watch Me closes the album off in fine style. The song is a proposition which it some ways should not work. It is bedlamic in a ‘messy’ way, certain textures from its first second crashing into each other rather than aligning seamlessly yet it all makes for exciting harmonic disarray around concussive antagonism which increasingly captures the imagination, rap styled twists only adding to the off kilter landscape.

Eyes Wide Shot is without doubt a band well worth taking time out to investigate. Their sound is yet to find bold uniqueness but as Back From Hell shows it demands attention while thickly satisfying; success easy to recommend.

Back From Hell is out now across many online stores and @ http://ewsband.bigcartel.com/product/back-from-hell

https://www.facebook.com/Eyeswideshotband/

Pete RingMaster 09/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Leaving Passenger – When it’s done

LP _RingMasterReview

Sharing a sound inspired by bands such as Incubus, Hoobastank, Breaking Benjamin, and Three Days Grace, Leaving Passenger is a Paris hailing band starting to pick up keen attention beyond their local shores. They have just released When it’s done, their debut EP offering six tracks of melodically fuelled and emotionally empowered alternative rock. There are few big surprises within the richly engaging encounter but for accomplished and enjoyably catchy rock ‘n’ roll, the EP is a potent introduction to the French quartet.

Formed in 2014 by vocalist Julien Boireau, guitarist Pierre Christophe ‘PC’ Maurier, and bassist Julien ‘Jumar’ Margat, Leaving Passenger soon completed their line-up with drummer Vince De Sousa. Honing their fiery sound over time, the band has already earned and become a strong reputation and presence on the Paris live scene which When it’s done is hoping to spread to a wider audience.

The EP opens up with Scream, its fizzy start soon ruptured by sinewy beats and in turn a fiery wash of guitar. From within that strong coaxing, wiry grooves emerge leading into the melodic and emotionally intense heart of the song. Boireau instantly impresses with his vocal presence, his tones powerful and earnest within the increasingly intense flames of guitar. There is a definite touch of Hoobastank to the song which only adds to its draw as warm harmonies court muscular rhythmic intent for a great start to the release.

frontcover-when-its-done _RingMasterReviewRunning Back To Me leaps upon ears next, instantly winding tempting grooves around them as vocals and riffs unite inside. Boireau again commands attention though sharing it with the creative exploits of PC and the firm hand of De Sousa’s energetic beats. Carrying more of a mix of Three Days Grace and Poets Of The Fall to it, the track eclipses its predecessor with its emotional intensity and creative drama; again big surprises absent but enjoyment felt full.

Through the southern blues spiced I Don’t Care and the reflective caress of Better Place, the EP continues to hold on to keen ears. The first blooms into a blaze of heated melodies within an emotion drenched climate while its successor is a captivating heart shared ballad with its own moments of passional fire.

The haunting essence of the last track is matched by that within Lies on the floor, keys floating over the senses fuelling that atmospheric feel as incandescent melodies and bold intensity smoulder to intermittently burn brighter throughout. Without quite matching the strength of other songs it still lodges in the imagination as too the closing title track with its melancholy wrapped strings/keys and intimately haunted balladry. It provides a fine end to the EP, blossoming to greater heights with every listen; an ability also shown by When it’s done as a whole.

The Leaving Passenger sound has yet to find its own identity but it only satisfies without reservations and within the When it’s done EP provides an introduction which just has to be followed up.

The When it’s done EP is out now through numerous online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/leavingpassenger/

Pete RingMaster 08/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright