Norm And The Nightmarez – Psychobilly D.N.A.

N&TN_RingMasterReview

After the stomping triumph of their debut album two years ago, anticipation here for a successor from Norm And The Nightmarez was always heading towards the lustful side. Psychobilly Infection was a devilish treat of the trio’s distinctive multi-flavoured psychobilly; a rousingly virulent bout of “wickedly contagious and warped rock ‘n’ roll” which Psychobilly D.N.A. has now only gone and eclipsed.

The Norm And The Nightmarez sound is a magnetic blend of old school psychobilly drawing on and infusing the heart and creative blood of early day and beyond rockabilly and rock ‘n’ roll. Formed by guitarist/vocalist Norm Elliott (Mickey & The Mutants/ Phantom Zone/ The Bionic Krugerrands), the Birmingham based band’s line-up is a fluid proposition around the core of Norm and his lively and imaginative songwriting, as further evidenced by his solo single She last year. For Psychobilly D.N.A., Norm has enticed the striking craft and enterprise of drummer Paul Mummery and double bassist Nile ‘The Rev’ Robbins; a threesome which just feels like they were meant to be as the album sparks the instincts from start to finish.

Inspirations to Norm include the likes of The Meteors, The Cramps, Johnny and Dorsey Burnette, and plenty of artists making up the Sun Records catalogue as well as various rockabilly and psychobilly offerings over the decades. They are essences which proudly and uniquely spice up Psychobilly D.N.A. from start to finish, immediately teasing ears within opener Thank You Very Much. A tribute to Elvis, the track is a contagion of anthemic beats and spicy grooves around Norm’s vocal homage. Within seconds hips are swinging and feet a blur to the lively temptation pouring from the speakers, vocal chords swiftly engaged too as the rockabilly nurtured track provides a collage of stirring enterprise bred by the trio.

The following Misery is just as forcibly infectious, its psychobilly instincts colluding with tangy melodies while being driven by the pulsating slaps of The Rev on darkly taut strings. Vocally Norm is as inviting and potent as his flair with grooves and hooks; it all matched by the eagerly landing beats of Mummery as smile sparking humour fuels the lyrical heart of the encounter. As its predecessor, the song quickly enslaves attention and enjoyment before Bury Me With My Guitar reinforces the album’s already firm hold with swinging rhythms and nagging riffs. A web of inescapable and inventive hooks invading body and imagination like a mix of The Polecats and Tiger Army infested by the spirit of Johnny Burnette, the track is a glorious trespass dictating movement and pleasure with ease.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe album’s title track steps up next, providing its own invasive catchiness and irresistible demand on the senses and limbs. The vocal backing of The Rev and Mummery is as sinisterly flavoursome as Norm’s lead as darkly toxic groves and niggly riffs all add with instinct rousing rhythms to psychobilly manna for ears and appetite.

That hunger for the album’s body and spirit ailment is instantly nourished again by the opening of The Sun Burned Down, The Rev’s shadow soaked bass line pure temptation soon joined by just as flavoursome crisp beats and the toxic beauty of guitar melody. Narrating the demise of planet earth, they combine like a final sultry sunset, seducing with portentous beauty as Norm’s vocals echo their apocalyptic radiance.

It Made Me Lose My Mind surrounds the listener next, its rhythmic palpitation alone a delicious infestation infused with the psychotic grooves of Norm while the following and irrepressible Wild Wild Woman carries a great Gene Vincent / The Shakin’ Pyramids groove before the band spice up Voodoo Street with some early Stray Cats sultriness. All three show the variety honed within and shaping the album and its creatively energetic character, a success nailed down once more in the unquenchable flirtation of the sci-fi bred Timeslip where hooks and grooves command as rhythms control whilst throughout Norm takes the imagination on a time defusing romance for yet another impossible to resist defeat of inhibitions.

Old school textures wind around psychobilly seducing for The Devil’s Gate next, its smouldering atmosphere as blood red as the dark moon shining upon is toxic tale. The track is sheer captivation, maybe not quite holding all the sparks of songs before it and certainly of successor Bad Evil Woman, but another treat to devour greedily. It is fair to say that an even lustier response was nurtured by the second of the two, a song offering another chorus which simply demands participation whilst its grooves and rhythmic enticement take swift control of body and intent with not for the first time within Psychobilly D.N.A., a touch of Leiber and Stoller like spicing colouring the songwriting.

As shown by previous releases Norm also has a handy knack at composing instrumentals which grip the imagination with their suggestive characters and melodic endeavours, Lynch Mob another fine example with it’s on the run intrigue and creative espionage. With The Rev and Mummery simply compelling too, it is an easy to get lost in adventure passing keen attention over to the fifties spawned Love You Little Baby, a scintillating track anyone like Eddie Cochran, Sweet Gene, and Link Wray would embrace in their discography.

The rhythmic voodoo of Night Fever is enough alone to send the passions into ecstasy next; the song blossoming into a boisterous bout of mouth-watering fiercely enterprising psychobilly equipped with feverish grooves and passion ensnaring hooks as rhythms cast a relentless tapestry of temptation. The track is superb but still overshadowed by the album’s outstanding closer.

To Victory is a canvas of battle strewn valour and destruction; a bold romance of bravery treated with honesty and reality as basslines eagerly prowl and beats scythe across the sonic and vocal dexterity of Norm. It is a glorious end to an album which infests every aspect of the body and emotions to leave instinctive and unbridled pleasure in its wake.

Norm And The Nightmarez might by primarily tagged as psychobilly but trust us, their sound and certainly Psychobilly D.N.A. is something any heart for rock ‘n’ roll in its various broad flavours over the decades will beat excitedly to.

Psychobilly D.N.A. is out now via Western Star Records on CD @ https://western-star.tmstor.es/cart/product.php?id=30216

and through https://www.raucousrecords.com/norm-nightmarez-psychobilly-dna-cd.html

https://www.facebook.com/Normandthenightmarez/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The DeRellas – Freakshow

DeRellas_RingMasterReview

Kicking off their own album Rockaway Records in rousing style, UK punk ‘n’ rollers The DeRellas release new mini-album Freakshow. It is an insatiable six track roar of the band’s familiar glam infested sleaze punk rock ‘n’ roll but equally their most instinctive punk rock centred trespass upon the senses. The result an incitement which just fires up the instincts to be bad whilst treating ears to their most irresistible proposal yet.

Freakshow is also the first offering from the London hailing quartet without vocalist Robbie, one of the band’s founders along with bassist Timmy DeRella. Stepping forward to fill the spot as if he has always been there is Stevie D, the band’s line-up completed by lead guitarist Luca DeRella and also new drummer Bish, once of Flesh for Lulu. It is a foursome which goes straight for the jugular with the Pat Collier produced Freakshow; from its first breath tearing up its surroundings like Johnny Thunders meets The Boys infested with the raw power pop of The Quakes.

Rip It Up descends on the senses first, from its first rap of drums and spicy grooves winding around ears with a salacious attitude backed by tangy grooves and predacious rhythms. Stevie’s vocals are just as cantankerous as the sounds around him, carrying a great irritable edge potently backed by Timmy and Luca as a strong catchiness invades song and ears. Carrying a touch of The Damned to its darker riffs and rhythmic imposing, the song without ripping up trees is a strong and enjoyable start to Freakshow which blossoms into a greater beast hereon in.

Strung Out Sin City grumbles and rumbles upon an already keen appetite straight away next. A nagging potency lines its riffs whilst rhythmically the track is enjoyably heavier and darker than its predecessor, it all combining with a lively imagination which sees the song quickly eclipsing the opener. It too has a chorus which demands involvement whilst Stevie’s rhythmic guitar prowess is a great echo of the sonic enterprise cast by Luca. There is plenty about The DeRellas sound which is familiar but as here rarely to the detriment of creating its own character and persuasive individuality.

cover_RingMasterReviewHinted at in the last song, a great 999 flavouring invades next up Soho Hotel, an essence which accentuates the virulence of the song and its fiercely catchy demeanour led by the swinging bass groove of Timmy and Stevie’s rousing delivery. Bish’s beats equally make a lively impact throughout as sonic flames escape the strings of Luca. The song is another step up in power and adventure within Freakshow more than matched by the album’s outstanding title track. Taking best track honours, it is a bad boy encounter; defiant in heart and aggressive in bearing stirring up all the punk rock/rock ‘n’ roll instincts within itself and the listener.

Dress Up, Mess Up is another pushing thoughts towards 999 comparisons without losing its own DeRellas identity; the song a boisterous stomp of hungry riffs and bitchy rhythms as vocals and melodic toxicity inflame an eagerness to get involved. Again you could say surprises are low yet everything about the song and indeed Freakshow is fresh and all persuasive.

The release closes with a captivating version of the Adam and The Ants track Plastic Surgery, The DeRellas giving it a rawer Sex Pistols/The Adicts edge which just hits the spot dead centre.

Freakshow is The DeRellas at their most punk yet and no coincidence that the album outshines their previous and thoroughly enjoyable reputation marking encounters. It is also a great start to their new label which we would suggest in providing more of the same will be hitting, like the band, far loftier heights.

Freakshow is out now through Rockaway Records digitally and on CD and 10” green vinyl @ http://thederellas.bigcartel.com/

Up Coming Live Dates:

Friday 11 November – Birmingham, Hare & Hounds (with The Black Bombers and The Primevals)

Thursday 17 November – Bristol, Thunderbolt (with The Setbacks)

Saturday 19 November – Reading, Rising Sun Arts Centre (with Rage DC and The Go Go Cult)

Sunday 27 November – London, The 100 Club (with The Crunch)

Sunday 11 December – Edinburgh, Bannermans (with Buzzbomb + more TBC)

http://derellas.com/   https://www.facebook.com/TheDeRellas/   https://twitter.com/thederellas

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cowtown – Paranormal Romance

Cowtown_RingMasterReview

If there has been anything more invasively infectious than Paranormal Romance this year so far we have yet to be blessed by it. The new and fourth album from the warped creative adventure of British indie popsters Cowtown is a delicious and riveting carnival of mischievously inventive pop ‘n’ roll amid seriously catchy endeavour which spark and inflame the imagination, only growing more tempting and irresistible with every listen.

Formed twelve years ago, the Leeds based Cowtown has earned a potent reputation and support for their rousing proposal of sound. Merging raw seventies power pop with punk and its post neighbour as well as their own modern imagination, the threesome of guitarist/vocalist Jonathan Nash, keybassist/vocalist Hilary Knott, and drummer David Michael Shields have caught more and more attention through their previous trio of albums; Pine-Cone Express (2007), Excellent Domestic Short Hair (2010), and especially Dudes vs. Bad Dudes (2013). New proposition Paranormal Romance is a whole new ball game though with the band’s most rounded and boldly captivating songs yet without losing the raw magnetism which made its predecessor such a greedily welcomed encounter.

Recorded with Matthew Johnson (Hookworms/Suburban Home) and mastered by Tom Woodhead (Forward Russia), album and band first tease with the brief introduction of Paranormal Romance Theme. As if inspired by Devo’s first couple of albums, the track awakens ears and imagination ready for the boisterous exploits of Clock In. Again rhythms and its off kilter melodic invention has the scent of the Mothersbaughs and Casales brothers; the Ohio band seemingly an open member of inspirations to Cowtown. A rampant romp of sound and energy, the song surges through ears with a melodic grin on its creative face and sonic deviancy in its compelling character which hooks and rhythms repeat with their own masterful persuasion.

cover_RingMasterReviewCastleman is similarly cast, exploring a more cosmic climate as it twists and turns through sonic rich imagination. Knott brings beguiling shadows to the mix whilst Shields’ beats subtly nag and drive the song into the warm arms of Nash’s vocals and his enjoyable toxic melodies. Submission to its raucous festivity is swift and just as easily given to the following Tweak. The track is a ridiculously persuasive treat; an invasion of niggling riffs and rapier like beats which is in top gear from its first to last breath like a power pop fuelled Dickies, an urgency which drives the whole of Paranormal Romance.

Living up to its name Motivational Speaker soon has ears and spirit lively recipients of its enticing pop poetry; simplicity and invention colluding in a web of infectious sonic arousal before the thirty odd seconds of Captain Planet entangles an already hungry appetite in its insurgent punk catchiness. There is no moment to catch a breath either as its short blaze is quickly surpassed by Not Sure, the track engaging in a senses blurring dance of enterprise and flirtation further lit up by the vocal unity of Nash and Knott as Shields beats seem to dig deeper into the psyche.

The bewitching grace and revelry of Castle Greyscale and indeed its inescapable rhythmic trespass has the passions hooked and lined in within moments of its opening melodic lure, only tightening the grip as enticing vocals unite with sonic stabs with bass and drums breathless in their insistence. Aural manna for an already heady party to the album, the song is matched by the delicious whirlpool of sound and creative revelry making up Let Go. It provides a theatre of imagination which burrows deeper under the skin with every one of its short minutes and subsequent listens, lust the ultimate winner and just as eagerly offered for the Devo-esque escapade of Closed Circuit where every second is sheer magnetism entangling ears in flirtatious drama and its pulsating canvas of fun.

Buggin’ Out strolls in straight after with its own authoritative escapade of senses trespassing hooks and catchy twists before the album comes to a just as thrilling close with Emojicore. The longest track on the album at three minutes, it uses all of its extensive time to weave a rich and thickly satisfying tapestry of melodic mischief with the right amount of discord and dark hues to enthral and seduce body and soul.

It is a fine end to an album which as mentioned just grows and flourishes with every listen into one of the year’s highlights. Cowtown has been approached with attention and praise before but not to the level it is easy to assume Paranormal Romance will incite.

Paranormal Romance is out now through HHBTM Records in the US and Hot Salvation and Audacious Art Experiment in the UK as well as @ https://cowtown.bandcamp.com/album/paranormal-romance

https://www.facebook.com/pages/COWTOWN/7567080935

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Skinny Girl Diet – Heavy Flow

SGD_RingMasterReview

Raw and defiant, unashamedly honest and forthright, British trio Skinny Girl Diet have a sound and heart bred attitude which refuses to pull its punches or tow the party line lyrically or musically. It is a combination which roars with anger and informs with uncompromising zeal and now fuels a debut album which just demands attention. Heavy Flow is a punk infused slab of grunge confrontation as lo-fi and rapacious as it is often melodically engaging and masterfully seductive; an incitement for ear and thought which perpetually hits the spot.

Consisting of sisters Delilah and Ursula Holliday, vocals/guitar and drums respectively, and their bassist cousin Amelia Cutler, London hailing Skinny Girl Diet has increasingly been talked about and covered over past years with Heavy Flow according to the band “a body of 6 years of work”, adding “it’s basically us as a band in its entirety.”

From it’s in the face cover featuring the ladies clad in white dresses inflamed by the natural showing of periods, Heavy Flow invades the senses with assertive pride and confrontation. Its songs are emotionally intensive flying in the face of suppressive attitudes towards women and numerous other injustices shaping the world.  It is a roar of frustration and uncaged ire which stirs up air and emotions from its first breath.

Opener Comedown Intro is a sonic entanglement of solemn nicely caustic guitar alongside an alignment of a pulsating bassline and crisp beats courted by enticing harmonies. Its relatively brief coaxing leads the ears towards the awaiting antagonism of Yeti, the band’s recent single. With a tinge of The Distillers meets Babes In Toyland to it, the track rumbles and grumbles on the ear while encasing it in sonic toxicity and vocal dispute as feverish twists add to the rousing melee.

cover_RingMasterReviewIt is an outstanding full start matched by the musically more even tempered Okay. Instantly catchy with its low key but virulent stroll, the song soon brews up a tempestuous climate around the increasingly engaging tones of Delilah, further switching and embracing the contrasts across its forceful endeavour. As its predecessor and those to come, the track is a lyrical poke which makes you stand back and think even as the imagination is eagerly accosted and beguiled by its twists and turns.

The scuzzy touch of next up Lazy Eye is impressively tempered by vocal harmonies which manage to snarl and seduce simultaneously while Eyes That Paralyse is an invasive rock ‘n’ roll grievance deceptively and cantankerously anthemic. The first of the two unites the rasping prowess and causticity of guitar with a kinder caress of vocal and melodic provocation, the second the raw emotion of voice and sound to an abrasive smoulder, both further igniting ears and an already lively appetite for the release.

Already noticeable is the imaginative structure and enterprise of the band’s songs within their ever scathing provocations, next up Bored the most bold yet with its wandering bass twang and sonic espionage around the primal beats of Ursula and Delilah’s standoffish vocal trespass. The song is a riveting tapestry of multi-flavoured adventure, as punk as it is grunge and noise rock seeded as it taps into another exciting aspect to the band’s songwriting and imagination before the corrosive punk ‘n’ roll of Wolf Pack just preys on the senses.

Another pinnacle within the loft heights of Heavy Flow is forged by the acerbically grooved and voiced Silver Spoons, the track a fuzz ball of emotionally trenchant, sonically bracing discord which just sparks within ears. Its unpolished beauty is contrasted by the warm clarity bringing successor Fix Me into view, its mellow calm breeding a Breeders toned predation subsequently bringing stronger turbulence to the song’s captivating atmosphere.

Through the venomously contumacious Pretty Song and the punk familiarity of DMT, Skinny Girl Diet reinforce their command of ears and a hunger for more, the second of the two arguably the album’s least unique track with its Hole/L7 like swing but as addictive as anything involved in the success of Heavy Flow.

The biting shimmer and growl of Forget equally stirs the passions with a far more inventive design soon taken further within the stormy majesty of Wasted Smile, a track which baits the senses with melodic and emotive elegance and within the flicker of a twist unleashes a blaze of sonic and rhythmic raging upon them.  It is a superb end to the album with Comedown Outro providing a melodically raw epilogue which only urges a need to press play all over again.

Heavy Flow impresses on first listen but truly grows and inspires with further investigations. It might not be declared the best album of 2016, though it just might too with a great many, but Skinny Girl Diet has provided one of the more important propositions to be embraced.

Heavy Flow is released November 4th; self-released in the UK and through HHBTM Records in the US.

https://www.facebook.com/skinnygirldiet/   http://skinnygirldietband.tumblr.com/   https://twitter.com/skinnygirldiett/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright