Asylums – Killer Brain Waves

Photo by the Cool Thing Records sparkplug Kana Waiwaiku

Photo by the Cool Thing Records sparkplug Kana Waiwaiku

Amongst the most highly anticipated releases this year here in the office, maybe the most eagerly awaited was the debut album from UK sonic punksters Asylums. Having been hooked on the Southend-on-Sea hailing quartet’s frenetic and devilish jangle since being infested by Wet Dream Fanzine EP within the first throes of 2015, a more than keen and impatient appetite has been brewing and now we can say it has been well worth the hours pacing the floor waiting for Killer Brain Waves.

Taking a snap at any and everything with a mischievous smile on their creative faces, band and release is the kind of sonic devilment ears and music were evolved for. Offering twelve tracks which flirt and bite, tease and seduce, with an imagination and eccentricity found in Bedlam, Killer Brain Waves announces Asylums as one of music’s most essential and even more so irresistibly thrilling propositions. It is a collection of songs within which sarcasm and discontent are frequent visitors as too a virulent dose of humour and fun driven imagination. Musically, Asylums recall in heart and enterprise the likes of Swell Maps, The Dickies, and Supergrass. At times essences also remind of bands such as Weezer and We Are The Physics but as shown a dozen times over, all are hues in a devilry uniquely Asylums.

art_RingMasterReviewMixing a handful of treats from their previous EPs/singles with new slices of angular revelry, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Luke Branch, guitarist Jazz Miell, drummer Henry Tyler, and bassist Michael Webster open up Killer Brain Waves with the mighty Second Class Sex. Its first breath brings a senses swamping tide of meaty rhythms and nagging riffs engaged in a toxicity of sound which simply infests the psyche. Though its spreads its body into a more expansive tempting, that energy never diminishes. Webster’s bass groans and growls in ears; a great lure matched by the swinging intent of Tyler as the swirling sonic seduction of the guitars lay their trap. With vocals just as potent and a touch of White Noise era XTC to the mix, it is a stunning start to the release, and one not losing a beat as I’ve Seen Your Face In a Music Magazine steps up next.

The second track is just as eager to invade body and thoughts, using a lower gear energy wise as a spicy wiry groove entangles ears and rhythms cast in another rousing and pulsating enticement. Melody and discord court the outstanding tone and delivery of Branch, each adding to the glorious trespass with a tangy hook just icing on the cake. New wave meets pop punk to give some clue to its ingenuity, the song departs so Joy In a Small Wage can share its ‘mellower’ charms. The track almost floats over the listener, keys washing its path though equally there is a darker edge in tone and another beguiling bassline to keep song and ears on their toes. That Weezer reference is arguably at its most potent here but again the result is, within a near perfect pop song, something belonging only to one band.

Bad Influence rumbles as it croons next, plaintive vocals and dirty riffs aligning with a heavy bass enticing to create another epidemic of swinging enterprise before the even more magnificent Wet Dream Fanzine leaps in. It is impossible not to join in with every Asylums song, and especially with this gem. Hips and instincts are grabbed straight away by the opening hook and swinging rhythms, vocal chords soon after as Branch leads a jangle of rhythmic agitation and funk infested bouncing clad in another fiercely tantalising weave of Miell’s sonic invention. A favourite since its appearance on that same named EP last year, the song continues to ignite tingles; as too the following The Death of Television. A nest of sonic vipers and stabbing beats, all with rebellious intent in their hearts, the song is one minute and twenty six seconds of creative agitation demanding similarly off kilter movement and involvement in return for its rare incitement.

The heavy punk ‘n’ roll of Monosyllabic Saliva comes next, its body a prowling beast tempered perfectly by the harmonic quality of Branch’s voice. Fuzzy with a thick feel to its atmosphere, the track is a brooding slice of pop rock veined by the ever insistent grooves and sonic tendrils escaping the guitars. Its dark tone is contrasted by the pop punk saunter of Born To Not Belong, a song which feels like it’s an already known friend as it makes its first proposal but simultaneously adds another string to the albums creative harp.

Necessary Appliances soon has ears greedy, the song twisting and turning with a more conservative sound compared to its companions but still unveiling a tapestry of imagination fuelled endeavour before Sunday Commuters and Missing Persons keep the thrills going. The first of the pair is another more controlled slice of pop rock with great sixties inspired harmonies taking the listener on a stroll of excitable rhythms and fuzz lined tempting while the second seduces with its Weezer/Supergrass hued canter around another commanding bassline and crisply landed beats.

The album closes with the outstanding punk raw challenge of Slacker Shopper, a grouchy and thickly aired proposal which as so many just hits the spot. The band’s most aggressive and irritable offering yet, it is a brilliant end to Killer Brain Waves providing a final new shade to their sound and invention, one we hope to hear more of. There is also a hidden track which we will call Butterfly just because the word is repeated most often. It too shows a fresh side to the Asylums sound; imagine the Beach Boys or Walker Brothers doing shoegaze and you get a hint of the great extra gift within the album.

We expected good things from Asylums with Killer Brain Waves but the album simply out does any expectations with ease. For fans and newcomers, Asylums and their first full-length are simply a must.

Killer Brain Waves is our now via Cool Thing Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/killer-brain-waves/id1105949093 and other stores.

http://www.asylumsband.com   https://www.facebook.com/asylumsuk   https://twitter.com/Asylumsband

Pete RingMaster 24/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Meshiaak – Alliance Of Thieves

Meshiaak_RingMasterReview

Formed in Melbourne, Australia and unleashing a debut that stirs up the instincts and passions like the first temptress/tempter encountered by awakening youth, Meshiaak have announced themselves as one essential proposition for all thrash metal enthusiasts. Alliance Of Thieves is one of the most formidable, exhilarating, and accomplished introductions sure to be heard this year; arguably no surprise with its line-up consisting of 4ARM’s Danny Camilleri and Teramaze’s Dean Wells alongside bassist Nick Walker and drummer Jon Dette who lists Slayer, Anthrax, Testament, and Iced Earth in his notable exploits. Together they have swooped into the heart of thrash and given it a fresh injection of imagination and creative energy; not exactly breaking its boundaries but providing the genre and more with a new compelling character to get excited over.

Recorded at the Green Day owned Jingletown Recording Studios in Oakland, California and mixed by Jacob Hansen (Volbeat, Pretty Maids, Destruction, Anvil, Aramanthe, Epica, U.D.O., Primal Fear), Alliance Of Thieves ignites ears with opener Chronicles of the Dead. Initial rhythmic stabs and a drizzle of sonic enterprise coaxes the senses, both soon part of a thumping persuasion which swiftly has ears and appetite eagerly awake. The vocals of Camilleri quickly grip attention too with the backing roars of Wells just as potent, while together their guitar endeavours create a web of inventive infectiousness around the equally gripping rhythmic thrust of Dette and Walker. The track is superb, whether winding teasingly around ears or driving through them like a ravenous juggernaut simply triggering spirit and instincts.

The first track also shows the melodic prowess and suggestiveness of grooves that Meshiaak are also able to conjure, the song a tapestry of intrigue and unpredictable invention which continues in the following It Burns at Both Ends and across the whole of Alliance Of Thieves. Whereas its predecessor has essences of Machine Head meets Testament to it, the second track quickly shares Slayer-esque hues once the listener has drifted through exotic climes into another tide of Dette’s addictive rhythmic craft as rabid riffs crowd around Camilleri’s imposing and rousing vocals. Calm and intensely hungry, the song is a beguiling mix of contrasts and energy, matching the inescapable persuasion and intensive quality of the opener.

art_RingMasterReviewThe dark and sinister I Am Among You follows, its initial lure setting the emotional scene before the band toy with the imagination with a Fear Factory/Metallica like trespass of the soul. Predatory and often demonic but from start to finish commandingly seductive, the track manages to eclipse the might of those before it, setting a new plateau within the album in pleasure and imagination before Drowning, Fading, Falling floats in on orchestral melancholy. Soon the mountainous beats of Dette and another brooding bassline from Walker are courting the sonic weave of Wells, together crafting another encounter which skilfully merges raw intensity with melodic tempers. A slow burner in relation to the earlier tracks, it grows into an easy to get greedy over threat, each listen, as with the album, revealing new layers and nuances within its storm.

Through the harmonic and emotionally plaintive At the Edge of the World, a song as musically vast as its suggested landscape, and the sonically antagonistic Last Breath Taken, band and album simply taken a tighter grip on the passions; both songs in their individual way casting lava-esque melodies amidst thrash fuelled intrusive intensity, though the first of the two is a ‘gentler’ tempting and outshone a touch by its rawer successor. The pair in turn gets outdone by the brilliance of Maniacal. Again Metallica is an open flavouring yet once more a spice to something you can only out down as unique Meshiaak.

The album’s title track careers through ears straight after, every second a ravishing crescendo of sound and creative instincts leaving bliss and exhaustion in its lingering wake. There is a hint of Anthrax/Megadeth to the impossible to resist proposal, Dette alone makes the hellacious partnership between band and ears worthwhile but mightily matched by the whole of the quartet here and across Alliance of Thieves, song and album.

The album closes on the shadowy balladry of Death of an Anthem where sultry melodies and a smouldering climate surround the again impressive tones of Camilleri. Its air and emotion though becomes more volatile with every passing minute as the track bewitches and brings easily one of the year’s finest releases to a superb end. As suggested earlier, maybe we should not be surprised the quality of Alliance Of Thieves considering its creators but any hopes and expectations you might have had for the encounter will surely be blown away with swift results.

Alliance Of Thieves is out now via Mascot Records @ http://www.mascotlabelgroup.com/meshiaak-alliance-of-thieves-cd.html and most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/meshiaak   http://www.meshiaak.com

Pete RingMaster 24/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Browlin – To The Border!

Browlin_RingMasterReview

Luring ears and imagination into the sultry climate and shadows of the Wild West on a funk infused wave of melodic and lyrical adventure, To The Border! is a highly suggestive and seriously captivating encounter everyone deserves to treat themselves to. Released by Browlin, the album offers up the smouldering melodic artistry of Morricone, the dark honesty of Johnny Cash, and the lyrical conjuring and prowess of Helldorado with the vocal suggestiveness of Rooster Cole for extra spice. The result, something as unique and magnetic as you could wish for.

Browlin is the latest moniker of Oliver Brown who previously was engineer and studio manager at Skint, where he gained Top 40 credits, hit 2m views on YouTube and was part of the incredible success of artists such as Fatboy Slim. With his new project, Brown has moved away from his electronic past to immerse in heartfelt picturesque songwriting embracing indie and funk imagination upon Latin honed rhythms and emotions.  To the Border! is the result of his exploration, an encounter which infests ears and imagination like the dirt and hot atmospheres its song’s premise’s and climates suggest.

The album opens up with Border and an immediate cinematic strum of guitar, it’s coaxing quickly joined by darker tones of bass and those Latin inspired beats. Lone harmonies and the subsequent vocal touch of Brown soon add to the already evocative prowess of the song, its lively canter taking the appetite in tow with little trouble. With keys joining the Mexican hued saga the track makes for a compelling start though it is soon eclipsed by the following Pieces. Brown’s gravelly hum aligns to another single melodic lure to open up the song, his vocals and words swiftly seducing the imagination as the guitar soon after leads into a bass and keys driven slice of melancholic funk ‘n’ roll. Even without electronic essences, there is a touch of The The to the track, even as it induces hips to swing and feet to eagerly shuffle.

art_RingMasterReviewIts success is matched by the earthy majesty of All My Days and in turn the flaming revelling of There’s Always A Way. The first of the pair keenly walks and then bounds through ears, more flirtatious rhythms seizing body and spirit as vocals and melodies paint a brooding yet warmly alluring picture. Virulently catchy with keys and harmonies bordering salacious, the outstanding track is matched in majesty by its successor, a Cajun-esque dance with spicy harmonica and woozy melodies within a climate of moonshine fuelled, and inspired carnival.

The thrills and seduction continue at an already irresistible level as Big Deal romances the senses with its Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers meets Chris Isaak swing next. Once more the harmonica almost burns its way into the passions while a thickly appetising soak of discord invades guitar and tone. It is an off kilter pleasure transforming into the haunting and fiery beauty of All About Us without a breath being shared. The new song slips under the skin within seconds, its repetitive hooks and melodic bait as enslaving as Brown’s vocal craft and expression and in turn the orchestral weight of an increasingly epic encounter.

I Sit Alone allows the body to at least rest next, it’s smouldering entrance with female sighs the canvas for the reflective declaration of Brown. You can almost see him sitting on the front porch of a barren land sitting shack or under the moonlight against a hanging tree as he pours out his heart. It is a dark and maudlin moment which subsequently evolves into a funk nurtured shuffle, rhythms and guitar entangling in a brewing descriptive sound and hopeful suggestiveness taken to new heights by the gorgeous landscape of following instrumental Death In Mexico. The piece is glorious, cinematic melodic poetry Morricone himself would be proud of and a track as intimate as it is visually vast.

To The Border! concludes with firstly Well I Never, another superb swinging incitement for ears and imagination with a whiff of Talking Heads to it and lastly On The Bank, a final fascination of sound, voice, and word bringing the album to a mighty close.

Not really aware of Brown’s previous work as such, all we can say is thank goodness he has ventured into new adventures through Browlin because quite simply To The Border! is an album bringing a new creative emprise to the whole music scene.

To The Border! is out now via Rife Records across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/browlinuk   http://www.browlin.com/  https://twitter.com/BrowlinUK

Pete RingMaster 25/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

A Blue Flame – What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain

A Blue Flame_RingMasterReview

Three years after the release and success of a debut album, A Blue Flame has released successor What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains, a collection of songs which musically tug at the imagination and lyrically at the emotions.

A Blue Flame is the solo project of British songwriter Richard Stone, a Leicester based artist who has been stirring attention these past months through a host of suggestively ripe and ear pleasing singles. What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains follows his 2013 cast first album someone else’s dreams will fill our home; an offering released under the name of Woodman Stone. As suggested, it was a proposition which grabbed ears and plaudits alike, its lead song Does Madonna Dream of Ordinary People especially drawing strong support and airplay across the likes of BBC 6Music and BBC Leicester with Tom Robinson calling Stone’s music: “wonderful unashamed pop music that comes with an inbuilt English Pop sensibility running through to its very core“.

Featuring some of Leicester’s best musicians including co-producer Adam Ellis on guitar and Tony Robinson from The Beautiful South on keys and brass, What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains is now whipping up even more loud attention. It needs little time to make a potent impression with When Time Slowed Down first up and readily caressing ears. Stone’s sound is a folk scented mix of British flavouring from pop and Brit Pop to a more rock hued proposal. The album’s opener is a gentle folk coloured slice of enterprise, a flavoursome coaxing gently drawing the listener into a release which just grows in strength and stature song by song. Keys and guitar cradle the dusty tones of Stone, a jazzy whisper coating every note and tone of the engaging start.

ablueflame_RingMasterReviewEveryday Yesterday similarly makes a low key entrance though there is a latent sturdiness from its start. With the firm beats of drummer Damon Claridge leading the way as guitar and keys amidst warm harmonies colour the track’s sky, a captivating catchiness descends on ears.  It is a quality ever present in Stone’s songs, making an increasingly vocal present here and in the following The Girl Inside of You. The new single, the track is a rousing slice of melody thick revelry embraced in Brit Pop meets folk rock flavouring. Increasingly addictive with every listen, the song has bodies bouncing and thoughts thickly involved as Stone’s lyrical and vocal prowess works on the imagination. A thumping proposition setting an early peak to the album it is also the spark to a new plateau within What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain.

Next up is Our Memories Fade, a less energetic endeavour initially which grows in energy and emotion as sultry guitars glow across crisp beats. It too has an instinctive infectiousness, an organically appealing swing wrapped in Americana-esque charm while Stone grips attention with his words and inviting vocal style. Its highly pleasing endeavours make way for Be Kind To Yourself, a smouldering ballad which might not have the same spark as its predecessors but simply beguiles with its fifties hued cry.

Earthy punk infused rock ‘n’ roll treats ears next in the shape of the excellent I Don’t Know, another imposingly enjoyable sing-a-long canter with Skids like fuzzy guitar, while the equally compelling Out There Somewhere shares its own piece of rock where again a Stuart Adamson comparison arises as the song has a touch of Big Country to it. Both tracks increase an already eager appetite for the release, a satisfaction which From God on Down feeds with even greater strength. Flirting ears with a twist of reggae inspired devilry and slight dub effect within its formidable rock ‘n’ roll, the track takes top honours.

A Julian Cope feel shades the inescapable magnetism of Marlborough Park Avenue, a scent which only adds to its bewitching prowess and success whilst The Sun Refused To Shine dips into the fifties/early sixties again with its teasing melodies aligned to another potent Stone croon and alluring harmonies. The two songs alone reveal the diversity of sound and invention which frequents the album, a variety continued by the country twanged folk of Feeling The Same and finally Goodbye as What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain goes out with the same poetic gentleness it began with, if with greater melancholy involved.

Enjoyable on the first couple of listens and near on essential thereon in, What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain announces A Blue Flame and Richard Stone as one of Britain’s most compelling propositions and exciting songwriters.

What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain is out now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/artist/a-blue-flame/id1078425623 and http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/ABlueFlame across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/ablueflame/

Pete RingMaster 25/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Happy Diving – Electric Soul Unity

HappyDiving_RingMasterReview

Managing to scorch the senses while seducing them into matching submission, the new album from San Francisco born Happy Diving is a swamp of thick fuzz and melodic romancing; neither aspect dominant yet both overwhelming and across twelve sweltering songs, instinctively magnetic.

Formed in 2013, Happy Diving has gone through various member and location changes while breeding a rich reputation for their fiery and sonically blistering live presence. It is a quality and strength of sound now found within Electric Soul Unity, a raw and intrusive proposition which just as potently entices with emotion and evocatively smouldering melodies. The likes of Dinosaur Jr., Drive Like Jehu, and Swervedriver are offered by the press release as an indication to what lies within the album; suggestions easy to endorse though similarly someone like My Bloody Valentine infested by Birdland or Hot Snakes suits too.

It opens up with Bigger World and an incendiary wail of guitar and sonic forcefulness as inviting as it is abrasive. Throbbing bass and repetitious riffs soon join the initial squall of sound; shaping and driving the song in its expanding adventure before the warmer tone of vocals become engaged in the persuasion too. It is a wholly magnetic affair as increasingly infectious as it is bracing and without a moment to contemplate matched by Don’t Be Afraid of Love. Raw sonic trespass and melodic enterprise collude as the track engulfs ears, its rhythmic coaxing equally as catchy and rousing as the band shares all elements with individual clarity while combining every texture masterfully.

art_RingMasterReviewDrifting away, the song makes way for lead song Holy Ground, a raw and emotionally inflamed proposal searing the senses as vocals and hooks tempt the imagination and an already keen appetite for the intrusive Happy Diving sound. With anthemic rhythms whipping up further enjoyment, the song steps aside for the album’s punk fuelled title track and in turn the melodic charm of Head Spell. Both tracks hit the spot, the first with its Nirvana-esque seeded essences and its successor through gentle melodies and warm vocals in a calm reflection though its climate is volatile and erupts to fine effect throughout.

Through the fervid sonic enticing of the Pixies toned Fantasy and the sweltering smog of Shed Light, band and release simply increase their hold on a now greedy appetite, each springing a net of melodic contagion as powerful as the sonic wash around them. Their thrilling invasion is emulated again by the poppier and highly stimulating assault of Lost My Way and indeed the swinging causticity of The Call, It Thunders. There are times across the album where a similarity between songs is apparent, the second of the two an example yet throughout it whips out a hook or twist which gives individual character to its presence.

More open diversity emerges in the latter stages of Electric Soul Unity; the calm reflective beauty of Pain Country and its suggestive melodies an irresistible seduction holding court even when the song ignites while Unknown Feeling is a beguiling vocal and melody shaped serenade to drift away with.

Final track River Will Flow ensures the album leaves on a tempest of sonic agitation and temptation, but of course with its own weave of rich melodic and harmonic enticing. All three songs provide a fine end to an album which grows and impresses more with every outing. They say noise annoys, not in this case.

Electric Soul Unity is released August 26th via Topshelf Records @ http://www.topshelfrecords.com/products/573831-happy-diving-electric-soul-unity and available now @ https://happydiving.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/happydivingca/   https://twitter.com/happydiving

Pete RingMaster 25/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Archie and the Bunkers + PowerSolo Split Single

sleeve_RingMasterReview

Dirt Water Records are never slow in giving us a treat or two and they have set the bar with the recent release of the split single featuring US duo Archie and the Bunkers and one of our sonic favs, Danish trash rockers PowerSolo. Offering up a juicy slice of their distinctive sounds each, the two pairs of brothers stir the instincts and arouse the spirit in a release all punk, garage rockers, and rock ‘n’ rollers in general should grab a bite of.

Archie_RingMasterReviewWith their self-titled debut album still ringing in and exciting ears since its release towards the end of last year, Cleveland hailing Archie and the Bunkers offer up The Roaring 20’s for the single. Taking their name from the classic US television sitcom All in the Family and drawing on inspirations from the likes of Dead Boys, The Animals, The Stooges, The Screamers, The Damned, Jimmy Smith, and Richard ‘Groove’ Holmes, siblings Emmett (drums/vocals) and Cullen (organ/vocals) instantly involve ears in a barrage of meaty and eager rhythms as the Hammond-esque tones of Cullen’s organ dances alongside. An emerging and lively blend of sixties garage rock/pop and blues infested psych devilry; the song starts as a fuzzy yet relatively controlled proposal but the passing minutes see a loco element brewing and subsequently bringing even more riveting discord and unpredictability to a rousing song and climax. As well as a tasty part of the single, The Roaring 20’s also provides a myriad of reasons to explore Archie and the Bunkers more and to check out their first album.

The same applies to PowerSolo and their offering. The truth is that if you have not been bitten by their sonic bug yet you have been missing out for a fair while PwerSolo_RingMasterReviewnow. Coming out of Arhus, brothers and string distorting guitarists/musicians Kim Kix and the Atomic Child are one of kind. Musically they seem bred from the same genes and inspired by the likes of Hasil Adkins, Charlie Feathers, and the Cramps, but as proven by their handful of albums, the duo defy one style, a single sound, and any tries to pin them down. Powersolo get the body shaking and swerving while the senses and psyche are being violated, all with delicious effect, and Fuzz Face, their contribution to the split, is no exception.

A single hook teases first, an accusation of one’s face quickly following before riffs and rhythms join the devilish affair. That initial hook continues to tempt, its lure simple but virulent as vocals and beats dance around with flirty shenanigans. With a perpetual swing which alone grips body and heart, the song and duo cast a soundtrack suitable for everything rebellious, frivolous, and downright naughty.

Two wicked bands and two irresistible romps, what more could anyone want.

The Archie and the Bunkers + PowerSolo Split Single is out now via Dirty Water Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/Split-single-PowerSolo-vs-Archie-and-the-Bunkers-7-+-download/p/67128820/category=13761039

https://www.facebook.com/archieandthebunkersofficial   http://www.archieandthebunkers.com/

https://www.facebook.com/POWERSOLODK   http://www.powersolo.dk/  http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/powersolo

Pete RingMaster 24/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Righteous Reprobates – Scarlet Sky

Righteous Reprobates_RingMasterReview

Scarlet Sky is the new single from UK indie rockers Righteous Reprobates, a song which infectiously shimmers and lingeringly jangles from its first touch.

Based in London and Kent, Righteous Reprobates draw on inspirations from the likes of Oasis, Arctic Monkeys, Nirvana, The Beatles, and Led Zeppelin. Openly a nineties Brit Pop flavour escapes their sound, the quartet using it, on the evidence of Scarlet Sky, to spice up an instinctive ability to create an infectious proposal. Certainly the song wears its influences openly; a familiar character to its sound hard to escape but similarly the new single shows all the attributes and invention which has seen the band draw strong attention and radio play since emerging.

From the first breath Scarlet Sky grips ears in its glowing lure of sound, its steely texture and smouldering melodies encasing warm vocals and harmonies as rhythms frame it all with a web of catchiness. The vocals of guitarists Rob White and Jack Griffiths emerge to unite perfectly across the inviting landscape of the track, their fingers equally casting a weave of angular and melodically spicy enterprise with just a touch of the 80’s more mod inspired bands such as Purple Hearts and The Chords to it.

With bassist Jack Collier offering a pulsating stroll through his strings as drummer Charlie Kenny drives proceedings with captivating beats, it all adds up to a highly enjoyable and tasty insight into the anthemic sound and growing imagination of Righteous Reprobates.

http://www.righteousreprobates.com   https://www.facebook.com/righteousreprobates

Pete RingMaster 25/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Possessor – Dead By Dawn

Possessor_RingMasterReview

Still drawing new attention with their previous offerings, British metallers Possessor unleash new album Dead By Dawn, a mouth-watering threat of their rawest, most voracious sound yet. Continuing to conjure their individual fusion of old school fuelled metal embracing everything from heavy and blackened death metal through to doom/occult and stoner infused thrash the London trio cast a viciously malevolent and addictively compelling infestation of ears and instinctive pleasure with their latest offering.

Formed in 2013, Possessor teased and tempted with the Wings of Fire demo in 2014 before making a far greater impression with their self-titled debut album later that year. Hellacious and demonic in equal enterprise, the band’s reputation and acclaim garnering stature was given another injection of energy with last year’s Stay Dead EP. Its four tracks breached a new level in sound and adventure by the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Graham Bywater, bassist Marc Brereton, and drummer Matthew Radford; one now pushed again by Dead By Dawn.

The album opens with Afterburner and its sinister, cinematic intro. As shadows collude with aural drama, it fades into the ravenous jaws of the opener, a mesh of riffs and rhythms which go straight for the jugular. The meatiest groove aligns to a primal energy and intensity, they soon entwined in a sonic twine of guitar and the effect cloaked tones of Bywater. Previous releases hinted at a Nurse/Troublegum era Therapy? essence in the band’s sound; the first song shows it has become an even more intense flavouring but still without diluting the distinctive tone and invention of the Possessor sound.

Predatory and inescapably infectious with Sabbath meets Electric Wizard overtones also to its body; the excellent start makes way for the similarly immense and thrilling Scorpion Swamp. Straight away the grievous growl of Brereton’s bass has ears gripped and lips licked, the appetite enflamed further by the sorcerous grooves and rabid hooks joining the mix. Again echoes of the Northern Ireland trio are a vibrant spicing as Possessor and track rumble and grumble upon the senses and imagination, the song an ever twisting web of thrash driven, multi-flavoured metal.

art_RingMasterReviewBeneath the Chapel takes over next, an encounter growing in ears with a less forceful character compared to its predecessors but one soon sharing its own captivating net of flesh whipping beats and rapacious grooves to seriously please. Again within an ever tempestuous nature irresistible hooks taunt and tempt, providing rich bait within the rawest roar of sound to come from the band in any offering yet and the same template seeds the following Without Warning, a design breeding another individual treat within the album. A tempest of grooves and antagonistic ferocity it simply blossoms into a psyche infesting avalanche of predacious animosity to leave a hunger for more.

Things take a breath just a touch as Slaughter High enters next upon another evocative bassline from Brereton, its suggestive twang absorbing bait deviously leading the listener into another waiting beast of sound. Arguably the most old school sounding song on the release, it gnaws at the senses as riffs venomously prowl and the swinging beats of Radford flail flesh with rapier like effect. More destructive and gripping with every passing minute the brute of a proposition departs in a cold storm to let Terror Tripping step forward with its own cantankerous and primal rock ‘n’ roll. Taking a touch more time to thickly persuade compared to the other songs before it, the track is soon seeing swinging bodies and eager satisfaction in its rip tide, especially when it shares another ear exciting hook.

A pair of instrumentals comes next, The Creeps another cinematic scene setting piece parading a glorious and voodoo-esque rhythmic enticement before Midnight devours the body and imagination with its blackened heavy metal and feverishly stomping aural necromancy. Both tracks has ears enslaved and thoughts conjuring before the closing drama of The Curse of the Hearse revels in the individual skills and craft of all three Possessor members, aspects uniting in an incendiary provocation bringing Dead By Dawn to an almighty end.

Possessor get bigger, better, and more creatively barbarous with every release and indeed more irresistible. A treat for fans and a thrilling introduction to Possessor for newcomers, Dead By Dawn and its creators are the kind of propositions metal probably does not appreciate or notice enough but would be a much blander place without.

Dead By Dawn is out now @ http://possessor.bandcamp.com/album/dead-by-dawn

https://www.facebook.com/possessorband

Pete RingMaster 21/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Twisting sounds and textures; exploring the sonic roar of Fero Lux

Fero Press_RingMasterReview

Casting their own fusion of math and hardcore upon the senses, Fero Lux is a South Florida quartet beginning to spark richer attention. The release of latest album No Rest has played a big part; the raw but addictive sound it shares demands attention as in infests the imagination. Live the Broward County hailing band has similarly earned a formidable reputation so we thought it was high time we got to discover more about the band. With big thanks to vocalist Victor, we look at the heart of Fero Lux, its beginnings, that latest album and more…

Hello Victor and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Yo! Thanks for talking TO us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

We’re a band called FERO LUX from south Florida. When we started, we all played in other bands. Our guitarist, David, wanted to start a heavy, mathy band. So he recruited us all. I was in something else at the time that I wanted to take seriously, and realized this was more fun. So…over five years later, here we are.

So you have been involved in other bands before so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring style or change of direction?

Oh yeah. We’ve all been playing in bands for 12+ years. I think FERO LUX is a HUGE melting pot of all of those bands combined. Our sound certainly has an overall heavy theme, but we’re all over the place if you listen to our latest record from front to back.

What inspired the band name?

We were huffing the smell of 100 unwashed turtle tanks. And boom…FERO LUX.

art No Rest_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Yeah, like I mentioned we started with a sound in mind, but after half a decade we certainly found what we were aiming for all along. I think it shows on NO REST.

Do the same things still drive the thoughts of band from when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I think we’ve become more socially aware. We always wanted to be a band with something to say, and I think we’ve harnessed that a little better over time.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

It’s more refined. The song writing is far more structured, but there are still a lot of riffs you have to hear more than once to kinda fully understand; still heavy, still mathcore. Also, this line-up–myself, Ben, David, and Nick are the most cohesive we’ve had to date.

Has it been more of an organic movement of that sound or plenty of moments where the band deliberately wanted to try new things?

It was certainly organic. We just lock ourselves in our warehouse and jam until new songs come out. We don’t really vocalize how we want them to sound. They just…sound.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

At The Drive-In is one we all say we can agree on musically. They pushed it like no other. They mesh all sorts of ideas and themes into each record…and ALWAYS had something to say. We consider them a very brilliant and selfless band.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Nawh.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Global strife.

Give us some background to your latest release.

NO REST came out on March 25th, 2016. It’s about a bunch of different things happening all over the world and locally. There’s heavy stuff, and not so heavy stuff. I personally like to think it has something for everyone.

Can you share some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

The opening track is called No Insignia. It’s about the war crimes committed on Ukraine and Crimea upon the invasion from Russian soldiers who wore no identifying insignia. People were forced from their homes, people were killed, and we here in America cared more about what was taken off Netflix that month.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

They’re finalized beforehand. I’d say the lyrics are usually 85% done beforehand and I just top it all off whilst in the studio.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?FL_RingMasterReviewn

It’s certainly my favorite. Live, we like to jump on people and have them jump on us. What fun is a live show if everyone is just standing around? And when we’re tuning and whatever, I like to try to make people laugh. We’re a “serious” band who tries to not take ourselves too seriously.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

It’s hard in south Florida. We have to drive over 6 hours just to leave the state. We’re always envious of the north eastern states that can cross three or four borders in the time it takes us to get to Georgia. We’ve found the cities we do well in down in Florida, so it’s been cool to revisit them. But we’re planning some longer stuff for Fall and Winter and we’re very excited to share these dates with everyone.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

It’s honestly crazy. Bands that seem to know how to manipulate Tumblr and Instagram get huge. Unfortunately for us, we don’t know how to do either of those things. We also don’t know how to sign unfair record deals. So I feel like we’re destined to remain the size we currently are. But who knows…maybe Myspace will come back?

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you again! Check out our music and videos at https://www.facebook.com/feroluxmusic and http://fero-lux.bandcamp.com

As far as a reveal, not yet! But we’re doing a small run in August, so if you’re in the south east, come check us out!

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 21/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bad Case of Big Mouth – Break It to Build It EP

BCOBM_RingMasterReview

New Jersey band Bad Case of Big Mouth creates their sound by bringing the contrasting qualities of pop driven punk and hardcore together and as their new release shows, it makes for one highly enjoyable proposition. The Break It to Build It EP is an infectious and often intrusively commanding fusion of hook-heavy punk rock and metalcore scented voracity, five tracks which tempt and assault with equal measure and craft. It is not maybe the most unique proposal but even by the end of track one it is certainly one of the most rousing.

Formed in late 2010, the East Coast quintet has continued to hone their sound and earn rich support and plaudits around their local scene and beyond. Their acclaimed live presence has seen Bad Case of Big Mouth share stags with the likes of State Champs, Chunk! No, Captain Chunk!, and Hit The Lights as well as making attention grabbing performances at festivals like Skate and Surf, two Bamboozle Fests, and on The Vans’ Warped Tour on four separate occasions. Now with a tour along the East coast with Crunkasaurus Rex coinciding with its release, the Break It to Build It EP is ready to nudge bigger spotlights.

The EP forcibly launches itself with opener We Wasted the Good Surprise on You; riffs and melody thick hooks instantly encouraging attention as rhythms are swung with firm intent. The clean tones of John Price swiftly impress, matching the lively hooks on offer and uniting nicely with band roars and the fiercer vocal scowls that join the affair.  It is infectious stuff with an imagination which constantly keeps the listener on its toes to counter a somewhat familiar character in sound.

CD ART_RingMasterReviewThe great start is continued by What a Save; aggression and raw vocal confrontation leading its initial assault on ears. Even with its hardcore ire and antagonism, there is a certain catchiness to the nature and enterprise building one tempestuous proposal, one which blossoms further as the guitar of James Benedetto helps spin a melodic web around the mellower but equally captivating clean vocal persuasion. Continuing to twist between its primal and seductive extremes with a gorgeous breakdown within, the song hits the spot easily before making way for the robustly raucous roar of Take Off. As virulently poppy as you could wish and as physically angry, the anthemic proposal is another treat on the ear and example of the Bad Case of Big Mouth ability to combine contrasts with skill and imagination.

Growing Distance keeps enjoyment high even if it lacks the punch and inventive spark of its predecessors, though it does show the band’s wish to stretch their songwriting and melodic invention in fresh ways whilst still intruding enjoyable on the senses. There is nothing not to like about the song or the EP’s closing offering, No Guarantee. A foot to the floor slice of pop punk initially, it goes through the gears of energy and ire with charm and invention to bring the release to a rousing close.

It is so easy to like and enjoy the Break It to Build It EP and understand why Bad Case of Big Mouth is beginning to stir greater attention. As they evolve a more unique sound, here is a band looking at much bigger things.

The Break It to Build It EP is out now via Manic Kat Records @ http://www.manickatrecords.com/releases/bad-case-of-big-mouth-break-it-to-build-it/

https://www.facebook.com/BadCaseofBigMouth   https://twitter.com/BCoBM   https://www.instagram.com/badcaseofbigmouth/

Pete RingMaster 21/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright