Biting the hand that bleeds you: facing the Weak13 roar with Nick J Townsend

WEAK13_RingMasterReview

UK trio Weak13 is a band we have had a rich taste for over quite a few years now, and increasingly so as new songs and their gripping debut album emerged. A chance to get to the heart of the band arose recently, so in a long overdue chat we talked with band founder Nick J Townsend about the origins and subsequent years of the band, the imposingly refreshing drive of the band and its members, their latest release and much more…

Hey Nick, thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Cheers yeah I’m currently running a music festival in Wolverhampton at the moment but yeah cool fire away.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

Well I’m Nick J Townsend; the band’s founder, I sing and play guitar; WEAK13 began in my hometown in Kidderminster in 1999; went under multiple line-up changes which was very distracting when it came to trying to do songwriting or trying to make any solid plans; eventually I moved to the Black Country around about 2008; I think that was the year; and then I revamped the band and recruited bassist Wesley Smith and drummer Neel Parmar. Since 2010 the band has remained the same and it’s ensured stability; we’ve been able to produce a professional debut studio album now titled They Live with engineer John Stewart and I know we couldn’t have tried doing anything like that with people coming in and out of a band;

Have you been in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Speaking personally WEAK13 is my creation and the main band I’ve worked in; I was for a short period in a high school band called Incision which pretty much seemed to just play Metallica songs but I made some nice friends from it; a couple of years later I joined a college band called Bamboo Puncturing; it was an experimental three piece thrash metal band, very heavy, the drummer Chris was also the singer, Stuart Smith was the bassist who behaved very metal although he would take the piss out of anyone else calling themselves metal. I just played guitar for them. The band only lasted about 9 months but for our final show we supported Strapping Young Lad during the ‘City’ album tour and it was the first time I’d played with a signed artist. Although it wasn’t a long conversation I kind of liked chatting to Devin Townsend and I think after watching his set I decided then that I wanted to do something on my own terms musically. WEAK13 began a few years later. Neel Parmar and Wesley Smith have both been in lots of bands before joining WEAK13; they’re very experienced musicians.

Photography by SquishFlash Images.

Photography by SquishFlash Images.

What inspired the band name?

I get sick of answering this one but it’s my own fault because I give multiple long answers but the main inspiration was the dangerous surgical operation on my head that I experienced when I was 13; I was born with a defect on my head, bullied constantly throughout my childhood because of the way I looked. Doctors told me at 8 years old that I could have an operation but I had to wait 5 years until I was old enough to operate on. When you are 8 years old and told that you have to wait 5 years…that’s like your entire life again! I didn’t know how I was going to last 5 days at school let alone wait 5 years. I was made to feel weak for years and the age of 13 was all I could look forward to. I was a very depressed child but I didn’t know what depression was at the time, had suicidal thoughts at the age of 8.

I was in hospital for a few months, my skin was stretched and my eye lids could not shut so I would pass out with my eyes wide open; it was a traumatic time for me. After the operation, over 100 metal staples and more stitches had to be ripped out whilst I was awake, no anaesthetic. I returned to school at 13 and I was a normal looking boy again; everyone then wanted to know me; the same people who bullied me….I thought “I haven’t changed….you have”. I had no social skills, didn’t know how to interact with others very well, didn’t understand the world; years later in 1999 my aim was that I wanted to feel the same way as I did before the operation so I shaved half of my hair off and then I named my band WEAK13. That may not fully answer your question but that’s pretty close.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I originally wanted to have a band on my own terms that I could shape; ‘Project Mayhem’ from the film Fight Club was a great inspiration. I always wanted WEAK13 to be a three-piece like Nirvana, Cream, and the Jimi Hendrix Experience; but it took a while to get to that stage. Three musicians working together seems to make sense, it’s a bigger thing sharing ideas together. I find bands with too many musicians in them become distant from the songwriting, we sound tight because there’s a tightness in how the song is forged; it’s not just a riff, there’s a story behind it; subject matter; a feeling. I’d hate to be in a band with five people or more in it; your songs are your child and creation and it’d be like trying to raise a child with a biological father plus multiple step dads in the same house, too many voices in authority.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

There’s been a lot of change since I began but the basic original idea for the band is still there and maybe more so now; where in the Fight Club movie Project Mayhem eventually became a cult-like organisation trying to bring down modern society; WEAK13 was originally intended to be anti-consumerist and even anti-music industry because I really find the majority of signed artists bland, lifeless and harmful; they dumb down the public with their empty songs and brainwash musicians in to thinking that they are as good as it gets. The only good things that come from many of the elite bands are the watered down ideas they steal from emerging artists and claim as their own but in a more boring and less inspiring way. There has definitely been some evolution in WEAK13. We’re using our music as a weapon; lyrically and subject matter wise we do things most bands haven’t even woken up to yet. We’re currently writing about things such as crisis actors, poison in our foods, population control and the brainwashing media whilst mainstream artists are singing about whose got the biggest bottom.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We have a very distinct sound now which is strange because we can play in different styles and it still sounds like WEAK13; learning how to be yourself is the key I believe. On the They Live album we worked with engineer John Stewart; he saw us play live and wanted to capture the rawness of the band’s sound on to a record but still make it well produced and of a high standard; he did just that. When we recorded Ashes In Autumn I think we realised that WEAK13 had evolved into a clear identifiable musical entity. People hear a WEAK13 song played and they know it’s us. A lot of bands can’t do that.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try new things?

Photography by Mark Hopson

Photography by Mark Hopson

We have to try different things every time; why write the exact same song again? Years ago I used to buy those albums where the first three tracks were the singles and the rest were just bad clones. I remember something Michael Jackson once said which was make every song a hit; now whether or not a song becomes a hit in this current biased and fixed musical climate is beside the point but I think every song should be treated with the same passion, enthusiasm and standards; there are no unimportant WEAK13 songs now. Every song counts. There’s a natural songwriting process, often the lyrics come first or the song subject and then the music is shaped around it. Some bands have no idea what to write about; that has never been a problem for WEAK13.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

The three of us come from different backgrounds, have totally opposing influences and we shouldn’t logically fit as well as we do. I think because all three of us do what we want in WEAK13 and how we want, it all comes together nicely. I have never told Neel Parmar how to play the drums, I don’t insist on knowing exactly what the baselines are to WEAK13 songs because I enjoy hearing them played and written by Wesley Smith; if he wants to change something he’s done then I encourage it. We all can be musicians in WEAK13. Yes, I often come up with the initial starting point for a tune but it changes when we all get together. When Neel Parmar laid his incredible drums down to ‘Obey The Slave’ the tune became more epic than I could have possibly imagined.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Normally it’s the song subject that comes first or a lyric, I might then put a few guitar riffs together, I go to Wesley Smiths house and show him; Neel Parmar hears what we both come up with together and then he interprets how he thinks the drums should sound and then we have a song. It’s literally often that basic; the song has to be interesting to us, the catchier the better; I write hypnotic choruses people say; well I never want people to forget them so job done.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Pretty easy, the world around us; there are forces of evil out there so there are plenty of things to write about. Media lies to the public every single day; governments are not for the people as they try to make out. I do a lot of research for any song subject and have to be very careful on sources of information as there is a lot of inaccurate data out there.

Can you give us some more background to your latest release?

WEAK13 began recording the They Live album back in 2012 and it took 3 years before we completed it; we all had jobs, no label, had to work a way to fund it, where and when to record, what tracks to go on it, the availability of the great engineer Mr John Stewart from the band Eight Great Fears. We didn’t want to rush this as we wanted an album that is basically better than current mainstream artists. We’re an underground band with no record label and no mainstream music industry supporting us but we wanted an album that embarrasses mainstream artists out there with a record contract. We have been getting only good reviews and it must be humiliating for some of these recording artists out there that turds like us have a superior album. People can order the album from the bands own site http://weak13official.com/ and we’ve not released it on iTunes or any of these streaming sites as we got sick of hearing how bands were getting ripped off, so we control our album at the moment; if they want it they order it from us. It’s got 11 great rock songs on there and they are professionally written and recorded, pretty much everyone that hears the They Live album is blown away and that’s how we like it. This is more than just an album, it’s a wake-up call to modern music journalists; they have a choice, either they sit back and watch their music industry go down in flames and patronise, undermine or ignore us, or do proper journalism and cover bands like WEAK13 who are growing naturally and are becoming bigger without any major corporate backing.

Give us some specific insight to the themes behind it and its songs.

Each song has its own identity and a role on the album theme; the manipulation of how most people see the world thanks to the mainstream media is a main theme to They Live. The song Sex Pest for example is not about sex but because I’m using certain codes of language the listener assumes it’s all about sexual deviance until there are certain parts of the song where I’m so obviously talking about nonsexual themes that you’d have to be brainwashed or brain dead not to notice, I even admit on the recording what the song isn’t about in the bridge section. The song is using the exact same sensationalism that newspapers do; sex themes to get your attention but there is a hidden agenda, my hidden agenda is a warning to be weary of the media with its semiotics and what it preaches as fact; do your own research. Now that is one song of many on the They Live album; I could talk more about that one song, there’s an orgasm noise at the beginning and at the end of the tune which everyone assumes is a female one; it isn’t; it’s the sound of Neel Parmar making that noise. Do not trust what you see or hear in media. The song is really too clever for its own good.

weak13art_RingMasterReviewAre you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Structure wise I think the songs stay very close to the original demos we make before entering the studio but we find that some things don’t work as well and we have to make changes here and there; when WEAK13 recorded the song Go Away it was supposed to be for the They Live album; it was the first recording session the band had with engineer John Stewart and it was beautiful and raw as hell; by the time we recorded the rest of the album tracks the nature of the sound on the album had changed dramatically and John Stewart asked us if we could re-record Go Away so that it was more on par with the other tunes on the album. So we recorded it again and it was super, clear as hell, polished and big, but we felt it wouldn’t sound right on the album as it was too good now; the rawness of the original demo was brilliant but when it became better produced we felt it lost a lot of soul so we didn’t include it on the album. It still to this day hasn’t been released to the public because we loved the original demo so much. Our engineer wasn’t happy with the decision but we had to be honest with him which I think he respects more.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

It is the best way to hear WEAK13. We play to new fans every year and they get what we are about; it’s more than just a live show, it’s an attitude; we see bands come and go around us because they have nothing to relevant say; musically we’re tight and we’re talking about subjects which are current and important to human survival and we deliver a message with every gig we play. We have some fans thanks to the internet who still haven’t watched us live but those that have seen us understand us a lot better.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

I think a lot of new bands out there are bone idol and lazy because they have been programmed to believe a rock and roll lie. A young and upcoming metal band for example wants to be a great metal band and so starts trying to behave like it’s piers but stupidly they play to only one type of audience and don’t even consider anyone else or any place outside of their comfort zone. I always hear the speech “We play metal to metal fans and no one understands us but metallers”; so with that in mind they will only promote and take serious the venues which are deemed as fully metal (who often don’t take the band serious as they aren’t big), they normally only aim their music to one type of audience (often an audience that doesn’t exist because they are unknown). They avoid everyone around them who are not of a metal nature or dressed like a bat, ignoring local promoters, potential new fans, snubbing local music festivals and venues, not trying to be a part of their own community, not taking serious the time of local and real recording engineers (preferring to home record on a iPhone), being rude to bar staff and venue owners when it’s in their best interest to promote their own shows and the venue including supporting non-metal bands (networking is a great opportunity). Working together as a band means everyone involved needs to work together not “Speak to Dave as he does all the band stuff…I just play guitar”. Kids try and behave like spoilt musicians with a huge record contract and management who do everything for them and two years later their band splits up and they can’t figure out where it all went wrong. I have never had problems with working hard and I get good results.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

We do have a lot of success thanks to people watching our music videos, they buy our album from the website, come to shows, grab merchandise at gigs and if someone just starting out asked me how to be a musician I’d answer “learn to use a photocopier or printer, learn social media, learn about advertising” plus a dozen other things which are often nothing to do with bashing out chords on a guitar. If you want to survive and continue to do music I think you need to learn other skills. I learned a lot about the stage by doing stage management. I watched how bands used the web for their career so I had to learn how to use the web, maybe in the case of large bands someone else was paid to do that job for them but there’s nothing wrong with having a go and trying to learn for yourself. To put it simply; a lot of members of bands have this idea that they can only do one thing in the band and that’s it, play a guitar or beat a drum; half the members of upcoming bands have no idea what their fellow musicians even do when they are not in a rehearsal room. The more skills a musician learns the better; yes I spent thousands of hours on a computer pushing WEAK13 to new places and it works. I invested my time and I got a result, I didn’t say “leave it to Leroy as he knows computers”; I had to learn a lot of boring things but they have helped the band. I fucking hate computers but I use them as a tool; that’s what they are and bands need to stop acting like rock gods who have everything done for them whist they polish their pickups and learn more about how they can help their band on the internet and most of all in the real world. There’s a downside that some bands do stuff only on the internet. WEAK13 has a physical album that you can hold in your hands, fans wear real T-shirts, we go out and play to real people; we exist away from the internet as well as be part of it and we try our best. Yes; we use the internet a lot but when you appear in the real world then people take you seriously more because it’s like a surprise to them; you’re not just a jpeg on their iPad, you can be on a physical poster for an actual show at a real venue filed with genuine critical thinking people.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Watch the Down On Me video on YouTube because it’s funny. I also direct music videos; I had to learn how to do film making, I have a University degree in film and media now and it is boring stuff but it’s for my band so it’s important.

http://weak13official.com   https://twitter.com/weak13   https://www.facebook.com/weak13fanpage

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Snarling blossoms: exploring the heart of The Bad Flowers

The Bad Flowers_RingMasterReview

Drawing on influences found in the likes of Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, and The Who, British rockers The Bad Flowers soon showed a sound with its own distinct character after emerging in 2014. The West Midlands trio has continued to grow and earn a potent reputation for their rousing sound and equally spirited live presence. Ahead of a new EP, we had the pleasure to throw a few questions at the band who kindly revealed more about the emerging might of The Bad Flowers.

Hello all and thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background what brought you all together?

We are The Bad Flowers from Cannock; we have Tom Leighton on lead vocals and guitar, Dale Tonks on bass and backing vocals, and Karl Selickis on drums. The band came about from projects we were working on individually that ran their course, but we all came together when we were playing on the same bill and we kept in touch from there.

So The Bad Flowers is not your first outfits? How have previous endeavours impacted, if at all, on what you are doing now; in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We have all been in bands before and have been playing for as long as we can remember. When we came together we found that we all wanted to follow the same direction and it worked really well for us, our focus is to play music that we enjoy, that we all have input into which we hope will bring something new to the industry whilst maintaining the influences of the music and bands that have inspired us.

What inspired the band name?

It was a lyric from a song of one our previous bands that we kept going back to, and when it came to us making a fresh start it just felt right.

TBF2_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and if so has it changed?

There was no specific idea it has just developed from what we enjoy playing and what we feel works well, and we are really grateful for the support we receive.

The drive to write great music and put on exciting live shows has always been there. The music itself has definitely developed as we have grown as artists, but we’ve always maintained the same sound.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We take more time over each song; we want to make sure each element of the song is exactly how we want it to be. Before we debut a new song, we lay down hours of practice to ensure we’ve got it right.

Has any shift and movement in your sound been more organic or deliberate in wanting to try new things?

The movement has been organic. As we’ve grown up and gained more experience the sound has moved with us.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

There is no one in particular, but as individuals we all have different inspirations which when we write together gives us our sound.

Is there a general process to the band’s songwriting?

It usually happens by one us coming up with an idea and we jam it out during practice until we have a rough idea of where we want it go, then we take it away and work with it to make it tighter and it evolves from there.

How about lyrics? Where more often than not, where are they drawn from or inspired by?

The inspirations for our lyrics come from Tom; he is always thinking of lyrics at work or at home to put into the songs.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?TBF3_RingMasterReview

The next release is a four track EP which includes our most recent songs that are more powerful and slightly dirtier sound than what we have released before.

How about some insight into its themes and songs?

The songs are based on our experiences in the band and as individuals. There is a song based on a recent tour of Europe and we try to make the lyrics relatable and something people can connect with.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We get the songs to the point where are happy with them, we practice them over and over again before we go into the studio to record. There are often times where we may make a few tweaks when we hear the recorded version to better the song.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We really enjoy playing live and we go out to put all of our effort in no matter where we play or who we are playing to. There is nothing better for us than seeing people enjoying our music and leaving with a smile on their face.

The Bad Flowers tour dates_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

In the midlands there is a thriving scene for new music and there are great local venues that support the industry. After playing all over the country it is still great to come back and play sold out local shows.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

We keep people updated on Social Media of up and coming gigs, any news we have and it’s also a great way to keep in touch with fans, as well as giving us a platform to promote ourselves to people who may not have heard of us before. Social Media is a great tool to use as long as it is used on the right respect.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for taking the time to read our interview. Keep your eyes and ears pealed for the future and we hope to as you soon.

http://thebadflowers.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/thebadflowersband

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Infectious bounds and spiky hooks: an interview with Pranx

PRANX_RingMasterReview

With a clutch of videos and a potent first EP behind them, Pranx is a German outfit beginning to lure potent attention. Their rousing live presence has equally drawn high praise. So to discover more about this upcoming proposition, we seized the chance to talk with the trio about their EP, progress to date, and all things Pranx in general.

Hi guys, many thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are PRANX, a Pop Punk band from Mosbach, Germany consisting of Marcel on drums, Rouven on bass and vocals, and Boris on guitar and vocals. We formed in February 2014. Rouven and Boris had played together in a band since 2008 but their drummer quit. Instead of just searching for a new one we decided to make a new start entirely and form a new band with a new name and new songs. We met drummer Marcel on Facebook to start PRANX in early 2014.

Being involved in other bands before, has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Like we said, Boris and Rouven had played together since 2008. Marcel was also involved in some bands before including a German hip hop band. I don’t think it affected the style we’re playing now with PRANX but it definitely had an impact on our growth as musicians in general. The good chemistry between our two vocalists regarding singing harmonies together for example has been cultivated while playing together in their former band.

What inspired the band name?

It’s a shorter version of Rouven’s and Boris’ former band Prank FanatiX. We wanted to have a name that’s easier for people to remember as it always was spelled wrong on flyers. The original Prank FanatiX name was inspired by the term ‘faith fanatics’ in Green Day’s song ‘East Jesus Nowhere’.

Pranx2_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As a band we hope to enrich some people’s life by playing music, just like all those bands we look up to did and still do to us. Music of those bands had such a massive impact on our lives over the past few years, so we hope that someday people feel the same thing about our music. That’s what we want to offer the people who listen to our music. Another idea behind starting this band is to create some kind of exit out of this daily routine. We want to achieve more in life than just working normal jobs and get stuck in boring lives like 99% of today’s society.

Do the same things still drive the band time?

Yes, we’re still driven by the same things. I think even more than when we started.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

It hasn’t evolved that much since PRANX started but it definitely has since our first days of making music in general. Our very first songs clearly had a Blink-182/Green Day stamp on them whereas now our sound is much more individual (even though you can clearly still hear the Blink influences of course). Since a few years we’re also influenced by this new wave of pop punk bands that has appeared. Bands like Neck Deep and The Story So Far are also great inspirations.

Has it been more of an organic movement in your sound or more a deliberate wanting to try new things?

A mix of both I would say. A huge part of our sound comes from us wanting to try new stuff but sometimes while writing songs something new comes up and you hadn’t planned it. If it’s not something we had in mind for our sound but still sounds cool we go along with it and try to implement it.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

That’s hard to answer. I can’t think of anyone that changed the way we create music but I’m sure it happened subconsciously anytime along the way. All in all we’re still very conservative songwriters. Take a guitar, play some chords and jam some melodies until you find something you like and go from there.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

When someone has the idea of a new song he usually likes to write the first version of it all by himself. The process is writing the whole thing, making a demo with all the instruments and arrangements and then showing it to the rest of the band. Then we look at it together and see what we can optimize and change to make it the sound great.

Where are your lyrical inspirations drawn from more often than not?

The inspiration for the lyrics comes from situations of our everyday life. Things you go through in every stage of your life or even things and problems we notice in other peoples’ life around us can make perfect inspiration for song lyrics.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?art_RingMasterReview

It’s a 4 track EP called Things On Your Mind that was released in early 2015. There are two music videos so far and the third is released very soon, but we plan on doing one for the last song as well. All the videos are directed and produced by bassist Rouven. All in all I think the album is a great mixture of catchy sing-along choruses and cool punk riffs, spreading a lot of positive energy.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Another Year and Standard are more or less love songs about girls from the past. Especially for Standard I tried to write the cheesiest lyrics and make it as cliché as possible. You could see it as a kind of a tribute to all the 90s pop punk love songs. Pogo Romance is a song about failing while promising a glimpse of hope for getting back up again at the end. Nightmare is about social isolation and forgetting to live your life in the ‘real’ world.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Since we’re a band that’s short of money like every other band and studio time is expensive we try to do as much work for the record as we can before we enter the studio. This means we have the final songs all ready to record in their final state and try to make changes in the studio only when really necessary.

Tell us about the live side to the band?

For me playing live is the best part of being in a band. It’s not only having fun and partying on stage with your friends but also the time of the night where you’re not on stage and have the chance to meet new people and other musicians. There are so many cool people we got to know just by playing shows all around Southern Germany. Always nice to connect with and to play shows for awesome people!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it in Germany? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the want is there for new bands?

Where we come from is actually one of the worst places for bands to start. The music scene of our hometown is as good as dead and I think it always has been. We always have to travel a little bit further to play good shows. We have to rely heavily on the internet to reach people because there’s little to no interest in live bands in our region.

Pranx3_RingMasterReviewHow has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

I don’t know if PRANX would still exist if there was no internet. We probably [would not have] even found a drummer if [we had not] met Marcel on Facebook. 95% of people got to know us through Facebook or YouTube so without that I don’t think we had a chance to even reach people.

I think you can still use the internet to your advantage even when you’re a big band with greater success. But I also think it can be hard to influence whether it’s working for you or not. What works for one band does not necessarily have to work for another and sometimes the mass of people on social media is hard to predict or analyse. In my opinion, your music is what counts at the end of the day. You can do every single thing right when promoting your music through the internet but if your songs suck people still won’t like you. On the other hand you can get good exposure if your music kicks ass even if you’re not a social media pro.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks for the interview! If you like, you can check us out at https://www.facebook.com/PRANXofficial to watch all our music videos and check regular updates. Watch out for our next music video for the song Pogo Romance that’s going to be released soon!

http://pranx.bandcamp.com/   https://twitter.com/PRANXofficial   http://www.pranxofficial.com/

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tyrannosaurus Nebulous – TLK/Straight Jacket

T REX_RingMasterReview

Tyrannosaurus Nebulous is a British hard rock roar which ahead of a highly anticipated new EP, have just uncaged a highly irresistible stomp in the shape of double A-sided single Straight Jacket/TLK. Two slices of multi-flavoured irresistible rock ‘n’ roll; the release marks all cards on a new spirit raising proposition very easy to find an eager appetite for.

Based in the Black Country, the foursome of Stourbridge hailing guitarists Matt and brother Paul Darby, their Dudley hailing cousin James Miles on drums, and South Wales (Caerphilly) bred Lee Jenkins draw on inspirations from 70’s hard rock and the likes of Budgie, Black Sabbath, Lynyrd Skynyrd, AC\DC, Status Quo, Led Zeppelin, Rush, and Thin Lizzy for their own adventurous proposals. As shown by their 2014 debut EP Never Gonna Be, which featured former vocalist Justin Catton, Tyrannosaurus Nebulous use all flavours in a sound crafted in its own identity. The new single continues that evolution, offering the band’s most unique sound yet without defusing what is an easily accessible and seemingly instinctively recognisable prowess. With a strong reputation building live presence across the Midlands and South Wales which has included shows with the likes of Captain Horizon, Twisted State of Mind, Buzzard, Vicious Nature, Sister Shotgun, Healer of Bastards, No More Numbers, The Delta Rhythm, Sour Mash, Swamp Donkey and numerous more, Tyrannosaurus Nebulous is ready to stoke up national fires with the upcoming Deal With My Evil EP in July and before it the fiery stomp that is TLK/Straight Jacket.

TLK comes first, a song introducing “the band’s very own T. Rex called Terence, sent to us from a faraway galaxy to teach us the ways of pure rock ‘n’ roll, so that we can defeat inferior talent show chart drivel and put hard hitting rock back on top where it belongs !!!” No matter the story, behind it, the track is pure rock ‘n’ roll which hits the ground running as riffs and rhythms entice and enslave with boisterous catchiness and chest thumping energy. It is no slouch in providing melodic temptation and spirit rousing virulence either, it all led by the dusty anthemic tones of Matt backed by the similarly potent tones of the band. As suggested there is something familiar about the song and the band’s sound yet it refuses to be pinned down while offering thickly fresh scented rock ‘n’ roll. Like its companion, the track feels like a returning best friend with a new line in fun and diversely flavoured rock devilry.

Whereas there is a great classic rock spicing to the track, Straight Jacket infuses some southern rock flavouring to its melody thick blaze. Within seconds guitars are spinning a web of juicy grooves and rampant riffs as bass and drums create heavy duty contagion. Again, it is a song which is infested with pedal to the metal energy but equally explores some just as stirring moments of smouldering melodies and sonic suggestiveness.

Both the Gavin Monaghan produced tracks hit the sweet spot with ease and are sure to please any hard rock fan with a taste for rock ‘n’ roll unafraid to show its influences whilst creating a new mighty roar.

TLK/Straight Jacket is out now @ https://tyrannosaurusnebulous.bandcamp.com/

Upcoming Gigs:

Saturday 16th July – E.P. Launch Party – Barge & Barrel, Tipton
Friday 18th November – Supporting ‘Children of the Gravy’ – Black Sabbath tribute – Roadhouse Birmingham

http://www.tnebulous.com/   https://www.facebook.com/TyrannosaurusNebulous   https://twitter.com/T_Nebulous

Pete RingMaster 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Risa Hall – Kids on Victoria Avenue

Risa hall_RingMasterReview

Photo – Andy Darbyshire

New York City born and now Manchester, England residing, singer songwriter Risa Hall has a voice and heartiness to her melody rich rock ‘n roll which simply urges ears to pay attention. The evidence comes with new single Kids on Victoria Avenue, a song rousing the spirit whilst laying down a rather tasty teaser for her upcoming album, Love is Telepathic.

An attendee of Forest Hills High, which was immortalised in The Ramones’ Rock and Roll High School and also lists Simon and Garfunkel among former students, with the legendary quartet great friends of Hall, she has built a healthy background as an actress before turning to guitar and songwriting; appearing as Frenchy in the Broadway Cast of Grease, touring as Mae in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and performing in radio plays among her successes. Inspired by KT Tunstall and Nerina Pallot, she turned to music with the well-received Apple Tarte EP catching eager attention with potent radio play on both sides of the Atlantic following.

Subsequently working with Nigel Stonier (Waterboys, Thea Gilmore, Sandi Thom), Hall released the well-received album Glass Full…?, an eclectic collection of ten ear catching songs. New album Love is Telepathic is its anticipated successor, a release recorded with producer Daniel J. Logan and being offered a potent teaser through Kids on Victoria Avenue. Straight away a romancing melody escapes the guitar to caress ears, rhythms similarly inviting as Hall’s voice and lyrical suggestiveness paints a warm picture for the imagination. A great Chrissie Hynde hue lines her voice, adding to an instinctive drama in tone and word which lures the listener in with ease.

Musically the song is just as gripping, its vibrant catchiness a spark for shuffling feet and a lively spirit easily involving the listener from first note to last. It is an infection wrapping insightful lyrics and sure to awaken some keen anticipation for the forthcoming Love is Telepathic.

Kids on Victoria Avenue is released June 24th.

http://risahall.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Risahall   https://twitter.com/risahall

Pete RingMaster 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright