Scare The Normals – Creepy Brainfood

Pic  Steven Clark

Pic Steven Clark

Providing Creepy Brainfood and plenty to keep ears and imagination excitedly busy, the second album from UK sextet Scare The Normals recently saw its outing on CD to back up its already potent digital release. The album brings thirteen socially conscious off-kilter boogies together for a warped adventure fuelled by the band’s unique fusion of electro, funk, hip hop, and psych rock ‘n’ roll, and that is to simplify their mouth-watering engagement.

Hailing from Bury St Edmunds, Scare The Normals first caught our years with their contribution to the excellent This is the sound of Sugar Town album, a compilation of bands currently lighting up the Suffolk market town’s musical landscape. Their track Tomorrow was a slice of sonic magnetism which in hindsight only gave one aspect to the band’s sound now being enjoyably discovered upon the kaleidoscopic Creepy Brain Food. With thanks to Seymour Quigley of Horse Party, another of the town’s essential propositions, who sent the release our way, Creepy Brainfood offers more aural flavours and imagination drenched hues than a Rio carnival.

It starts with Enter the Temple, a gateway into the album through voice and resonance initially but soon becoming a throbbing lure with warning sirens and sonic squelches. Vocalist/MC, like a side show barker, makes the final invitation before the listener finds himself lost in and absorbed by in the funky saunter of Four Hornets and a Goose. Carrying a Disraeli and the Small Gods feel to it, the song strolls along with a swinging body and sultry flirtations of guitar, its pulsating psychedelic coated body ridden skilfully by Illinspired’s insightful lyrical and rap prowess.

By its close the song has the body and imagination firmly involved and ready to embrace the jazzy funk revelry of Heavy Grammar. As in its predecessor, a throaty bassline from Mikey BassandStuff spines the rhythmic shuffle of Simon Chapple around which Gish’s guitar, with a host of other electronic and fuzzy textures, dances with infectious enterprise. Nineties band Honky comes to mind during the track, but fair to say a passing thought again in something unique to Scare The Normals with the vocal blend as persuasive as the tapestry of aural flirtation around them.

Scare The Normals - Creepy Brainfood cover_RingMasterReviewThe following Deeper Water is the first track to feature a guest appearance from Deftex legend MC Chrome. Straight away it has a swampy air and feel, a glorious thick bluesy tempting which soon blossoms exotic textures and Eastern melodies in its elegantly flowing body. The union and contrasts of the two vocalists is just as mesmeric, their raps at times almost mischievously duelling especially leading up to and during sizzling eruptions into rock ‘n’ roll devilry. The track transfixes as it gets hips swaying, a reaction the album manages to majestically achieve at every twist and turn including through next up Naga Viper. Predominantly a celestially lit instrumental with again worldly aural colours gracing its bubbly jazz funk, the song simply romances the imagination before Brass Leaf shares its suggestive drama of sound and word to repeat the previous rousing alchemy at play with its own individual carnival.

Through the short punk theatre of Dicky Metcalf Pawned his Pistol, a track playing with a Ripping Yarns like mischief as it touches intimate tragedy, and the even briefer noir lit meander of Bob’s Passion, Scare The Normals reveal more of their diversely adventurous exploration and theatre. Shaped by their bold imagination, each provides a new pasture to embrace with samples and dizzying spins of wax by Dr. Ughh adding to the ear gripping fun.

The album continues with its title track; another song breeding rich evocative shadows around poetic melodies and suggestive keys while sharing a darkly hued tale which crawls through ears into the imagination and psyche. The track is superb, a spellbinding hug as sinister as it is seductive and irresistible.

Luminous Footprint comes next with sonic and electronic spatters of sound almost as candescent as its title suggests. The bass brings a Cure like tone to the emerging track too, reinforcing its initial lure before another funk infested tango lifts feet and sparks hips into flirtatious motion. The Pigbag-esque instrumental borrows body and spirit with ease; passing both when finished on to the fleeting throbbing bass led swing of Sarcastic Fringe Head. One minute in length the track again has swift involvement drawn and carried on by the excellent Tomorrow. Maybe providing the biggest twist within Creepy Brainfood, the song is an enthralling enticement of electro rock with an eighties air recalling the likes of The Normal and Naked Lunch. Its mysterious electronics and prowling rhythms lay the seeds to a compelling infestation of the passions, attitude laced vocals and sinister almost cinematic sonic endeavour completing the inescapable lure of the thrilling encounter.

The psychedelically glazed soundscape of New Adventure brings the album to a close, Chrome again guesting with alongside DJ Tags. Their vocal craft including that of Illinspired creates a spiky and stirring jab to a track which gracefully envelops the senses if with a slight edge to its mystical floatation. It is a great end to an album which just grows and shines brighter with every listen, each venture finding something new to explore and become intimate with.

Scare The Normals are like few other bands, if any, and Creepy Brainfood a journey through unconventional pastures of sound and imagination which everyone deserves to get a helping of.

Creepy Brainfood is out now @ http://scarethenormals.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/SCARE-THE-NORMALS-60881200139

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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