Introducing the Perfect Pop Co-op

ppco_RingMasterReview

I hear you asking just what is Perfect Pop Co-op. In the words of its founders, it is “A record label set up by a bunch of music obsessives to release all of our various musical adventures…

There is a good chance you might already have come across the label especially if fans of the inimitable pop ‘n’ roll of The Tuesday Club.  Created by Andreas Vanderbraindrain and his colleagues in the band, PPCO was set up a few years back to release the exploits of The Tuesday Club as well as those of the bands they were also involved in at the time and previously. The success of The Tuesday Club quickly stole all attention and time it is fair to say, with the label becoming the sole vehicle for the band’s acclaim sparking releases over the past four years.

Tuesday Club_RingMasterReviewNow though, the label has gone back to its initial intent and is beginning to release old side projects, new side projects, collaborations, and plenty more alongside the continuing creative antics of The Tuesday Club. Under its umbrella, a clutch of singles are already lying provocatively available alongside the recent quadrilogy of EPs from The Tuesday Club, a collection of tracks ready to flirt with ears and imagination.

For those behind PPCO, the perfect pop song “is the 3 minute, or under, 7 inch vinyl” with the likes of the Buzzcocks singles, Virginia Plain from Roxy Music, and Get it On by T.Rex as examples. It is a design which has shaped The Tuesday Club songs since day one and going on early evidence is the starting point for the bands on the PPCO roster which also includes The Bleeed, The DIY or Die Organisation (also known as The D.O.D.O), Andreas and the Wolf, and Reverse Family.

Alongside the music, PPCO also has an online magazine keeping all up to date with the label and its bands with half devoted to the world of The Tuesday Club, which their fans know is a full time job in itself. The latest issue has insight on those bands behind the label’s new releases, plus additional features on the likes of Department S and Automat as well as news, shows and much more. The magazine is a throwback to the seventies DIY press in tone and character, a time when it was almost as much fun and informative to read about bands as it was to hear them.

As to the music, we have already mentioned the four EPs of The Tuesday Club released over the past eighteen months, Forbidden Kiss, My Consciousness, Lady Gargar, and Boo Hoo, for ppco4_RingMasterReviewwhich you can find reviews elsewhere within The RR. Alongside them there is also the original New Glamour single from the band, a track which swiftly became a crowd lust and here shares the plaudits with its B-side Old Before Your Time, a typical and an as ever one of a kind Tuesday Club encounter.

Also recently available is The D.O.D.O single Waiting for the Walls to Come Down. The Saint Albans band, consisting of vocalist/guitarist Andy Scratch, guitarist Steve Filth, and bassist/keyboardist/drummer John Viney, creates a psych pop adventure with a great scent of darker punk blues to it, especially in Waiting for the Walls to Come Down. It has a nostalgic seventies air too yet strolls along with a fresh rock ‘n’ roll swagger embracing decades of the genre’s invention. It is accompanied by the sultry croon of Into The Black, a thrilling slow tease of a song with a southern bred air caressing the imagination like a mix of John Otway and a Bowie inspired Wedding Present.

Also out now is The Silent Scream EP by The Bleeed. With its title borrowed from one of the best episodes in the Hammer House of Horror series of the eighties starring the legendary ppco 1_RingMasterReviewPeter Cushing, the EP and its title track quickly thrust their sonic tendrils through ears. The opener rhythmically dances with devilish intent on the senses instantly, the quartet of Beautiful Wolf, TB telski, Andreas Vanderbraindrain, and Wasabi P flirting with and prowling the psyche with their horror punk ‘n’ roll. Seemingly inspired by eighties gothic rock as well as darker rock ‘n’ roll hues, the song swings along with a character and dark melodic drama which does reminds a touch of the previously mentioned Department S. The track is glorious, a rousing slice of dark anthemic pop backed up as potently by the punkish Valerie Leon (Queen of Neon), a tribute to one of Hammer Film’s many stars and finally Super Juice, a wonderfully irritable and fiery song.

All these releases can be found on the Perfect Pop Co-op bandcamp site with the added treat of a free to download cover of Commando from The Bleeed, a track released to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the release of The Ramones’ debut album.

It is just the start of big things from Perfect Pop Co-op, plenty more releases being line-up with in time the label hoping to embrace a broader expanse of bands. They have certainly started in style with the first selection of records, uncaging hungry and unpredictable pop ‘n’ roll encounters that simply excite and grab attention.

Keep an eye and ear out for what comes next at, musically https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com, and in word and vision @ https://issuu.com/perfectpopco-op/docs/in_the_club_028_may_16/1

https://www.facebook.com/The-Perfect-Pop-Co-Op-205518542879875/

Pete RingMaster 16/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Exploring the rousing roar of Maxdmyz

Maxdmyz_RingMasterReview

Maxdmyz is a London based metal quintet who has earned a potent reputation over the year as a live proposition and through their striking sound and releases. We were took the chance to find out more about the band with thanks to its members, exploring its origins, heart, and creative pulse…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Twister: So I’m Twister – I sing, write the lyrics, melodies and make the odd contribution to the tunes themselves. You’ve got Roger on guitar, A’Zedd on bass, and Vortex on keys and programming with Jay on drums and programming.

The band has taken different forms over the years – I’m the only founding member, although Jay and I have been working in the band for quite a while now. A’Zedd and Vortex joined a couple of years ago, and have each brought their own flavours to the band – A’Zedd in jazz and blues, and Vortex in goth, industrial and electronica. Roger was the brains behind German death-metallers, Apophis, and Jay has an incredible number of influences from Cardiacs to Nile and Squarepusher.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Jay: Yeah, we’ve all been band whores ever since any of us can remember. I don’t think we consciously decided on one musical direction or another – what does mark us out though is an openness just to see where things take us. It’s a unique combination of influences and personalities and it’s that chemistry that gives us our sound, and everyone is welcome, in fact encouraged, to contribute as fully as possible to the best of their ability.

What inspired the band name?

Vortex:  Twis likes to tell a story where it was a dyslexic founding member who came up with it – I’m still not sure whether I believe him but the name at least is distinctive and, if not memorable, you remember that you can’t remember it – er, if you see what I mean!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

A’Zedd: Wow, I’d like to say there is and that we have a sense of a specific sound and vibe that we want to create. But it would be a massive lie. It’s much less conscious than that and all the better for it. Emotional connection – that’s the beginning and the end of it, and our music is the vehicle to do it.

maxdmyz1_RingMasterReviewDo the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Roger: What do you mean – “was” fresh-faced – I think the band has developed over time, but whether progression or regression, who knows. As for evolution, well, every time we play or rehearse, we get closer and stronger – the material improves, as do our live performances. We are all incredibly driven, and always will be – it’s just a compulsion to connect.

So since your early days, how would you say your sound has actually evolved?

Twister: We’ve become heavier and more melodic – we started out really almost as loopy drum ‘n’ bass laced with samples, goth vocals, and heavy guitars. And it’s definitely an organic thing, although this openness to see where things take us naturally has definitely led to innovation and experiment?

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations, you touched on it with Jay but are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A’Zedd: It’s weird, you know, but almost everything you encounter and process, musically or otherwise, has an impact – either as repellent or attractant. There are certain kinds of music and artists I don’t want to emulate – and that’s as much if not more of an influence on our music, vibe and outlook as anything else. But my native discretion forbids me from naming names.

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Jay: Each of us is a songwriter in their own right – so what generally happens is that one of us presents an idea, even at a relatively early stage of development, and we jam and refine it. We all have our areas of expertise, but we are all very open to contributions and suggestions from band mates. The songs refine and develop through practice and live performance.

Roger: If one of us doesn’t feel comfortable with something, we generally dump it as we’ve all got to be happy with the final product if we’re going to deliver it with conviction; having said that, we are all happy to compromise. This is one of the most productive and democratic bands I have ever worked in – it’s just mutual respect and everyone working towards the same goal. Publishing is always divided five ways, regardless.

Vortex: Yeah, part of the pleasure of being in this band is that everyone works to get the best possible level of creativity out of everyone else – we all see ourselves as enablers of the others’ creativity and are glad to be so. It feels so good to be working in a collaborative environment where everyone is respected and feels represented.

Where, more often than not, do you draw inspirations for the lyrical side of your songs?

Twister: I guess this is my shout – since I write the damn things. It’s from the extremes of emotional experience, more often than not – or sometimes from some ironic or sardonic take on an issue that grabs me – from anorexia to suicide bombers. They’re noises made to music in the end and they either work or don’t work.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

Jay: It feels a little weird talking about it, as it feels a long time ago now and we will be releasing a new album later this year or early the next – The Hate Plane was released in August 2014, maxdmyz artmaxdmyz_RingMasterReviewalthough it still seems to be exciting interest and radio play etc. as if it had been released just a month or two ago; that may be a characteristic of the internet age, people come across this stuff online every day and for them it’s new and fresh. Grieve, the single off the album, is still getting a lot of radio play, especially in the States, as are All and Side with Satan.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind the album.

Vortex: Apocalypse, the counter culture under pressure, individual desperation in the face of personal powerlessness and alienation, anger, boredom, sex, mental illness, political injustice – you know; the usual stuff. The premise is, I guess, is that existentially you have to make a statement even if the only one listening is yourself.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

A’Zedd: The answer is yes. I think you have to be as prepared and ‘finalised’ as possible and that’s because things will always change and that’s good. We can’t afford financially or creatively to mess around composing on recording time. That’s why, when I estimate how long it’s going to take to record anything, I estimate, double the figure, then double it again.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Roger: As a relatively new member, I can say that that’s what drew me to the band. I’d seen them in one guise or other playing live for a few years on the London circuit. It was one show in particular which I thought was electric – at the Dome in North London. Twister is a fantastic singer, and A’Zedd is such a fluent, effortless bassist. Vortex has this extraordinary presence. And Jay is one of the most phenomenal drummers I have ever seen, let alone played with. Playing with these guys is an incredible adrenaline rush and communicates that excitement to the audience, and that, in the end, is what it’s all about.

maxdmyz2_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Jay: London is the last place in the universe you’d want to start or be in a band. There are probably thousands of different acts all trying to climb out of the sewer that is the London music scene. Some of the great metal bands have come from the UK, but culturally there seems to be less appetite for it than you’d think. There are opportunities to make a mark for new bands of course, but there is always that element of luck – being in the right place at the right time, knowing the right people and so on. Rick Wakeman once said that any band looking for a deal doesn’t deserve one – easy for him to say, but he’s only half right. With the internet now though, it’s sometimes easier to make a mark somewhere else in the world rather than closer to home.

So how has the internet and social media impacted on you guys to date?

Vortex: It’s had a massive positive impact on getting our music out there. There is a fantastic democratizing influence that the internet has had – it kind of flattens out celebrity – everyone has a website – you can visit Slayer’s or Maxdmyz’s and the experience is much the same – you listen and you either like it or you don’t. True, it’s less easy to get rich off music if you’re an artist – well, it was never that easy, but so what! In what moral universe does Phil Collins earn millions of dollars off a song it took him three minutes to write, where the average ambulance driver or nurse earns naff all by comparison. And you don’t need any specialist skills apart from the ability to click on links and send emails, seriously.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

A’Zedd: Well, thank you for your interest. Yep, we’ve just heard we’ll be playing Club Antichrist on 11th November. See you there!

Check out Maxdmyz further @ https://www.facebook.com/maxdmyz and their music @ http://maxdmyz.bandcamp.com/

https://maxdmyz.uk/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Scare The Normals – Creepy Brainfood

Pic  Steven Clark

Pic Steven Clark

Providing Creepy Brainfood and plenty to keep ears and imagination excitedly busy, the second album from UK sextet Scare The Normals recently saw its outing on CD to back up its already potent digital release. The album brings thirteen socially conscious off-kilter boogies together for a warped adventure fuelled by the band’s unique fusion of electro, funk, hip hop, and psych rock ‘n’ roll, and that is to simplify their mouth-watering engagement.

Hailing from Bury St Edmunds, Scare The Normals first caught our years with their contribution to the excellent This is the sound of Sugar Town album, a compilation of bands currently lighting up the Suffolk market town’s musical landscape. Their track Tomorrow was a slice of sonic magnetism which in hindsight only gave one aspect to the band’s sound now being enjoyably discovered upon the kaleidoscopic Creepy Brain Food. With thanks to Seymour Quigley of Horse Party, another of the town’s essential propositions, who sent the release our way, Creepy Brainfood offers more aural flavours and imagination drenched hues than a Rio carnival.

It starts with Enter the Temple, a gateway into the album through voice and resonance initially but soon becoming a throbbing lure with warning sirens and sonic squelches. Vocalist/MC, like a side show barker, makes the final invitation before the listener finds himself lost in and absorbed by in the funky saunter of Four Hornets and a Goose. Carrying a Disraeli and the Small Gods feel to it, the song strolls along with a swinging body and sultry flirtations of guitar, its pulsating psychedelic coated body ridden skilfully by Illinspired’s insightful lyrical and rap prowess.

By its close the song has the body and imagination firmly involved and ready to embrace the jazzy funk revelry of Heavy Grammar. As in its predecessor, a throaty bassline from Mikey BassandStuff spines the rhythmic shuffle of Simon Chapple around which Gish’s guitar, with a host of other electronic and fuzzy textures, dances with infectious enterprise. Nineties band Honky comes to mind during the track, but fair to say a passing thought again in something unique to Scare The Normals with the vocal blend as persuasive as the tapestry of aural flirtation around them.

Scare The Normals - Creepy Brainfood cover_RingMasterReviewThe following Deeper Water is the first track to feature a guest appearance from Deftex legend MC Chrome. Straight away it has a swampy air and feel, a glorious thick bluesy tempting which soon blossoms exotic textures and Eastern melodies in its elegantly flowing body. The union and contrasts of the two vocalists is just as mesmeric, their raps at times almost mischievously duelling especially leading up to and during sizzling eruptions into rock ‘n’ roll devilry. The track transfixes as it gets hips swaying, a reaction the album manages to majestically achieve at every twist and turn including through next up Naga Viper. Predominantly a celestially lit instrumental with again worldly aural colours gracing its bubbly jazz funk, the song simply romances the imagination before Brass Leaf shares its suggestive drama of sound and word to repeat the previous rousing alchemy at play with its own individual carnival.

Through the short punk theatre of Dicky Metcalf Pawned his Pistol, a track playing with a Ripping Yarns like mischief as it touches intimate tragedy, and the even briefer noir lit meander of Bob’s Passion, Scare The Normals reveal more of their diversely adventurous exploration and theatre. Shaped by their bold imagination, each provides a new pasture to embrace with samples and dizzying spins of wax by Dr. Ughh adding to the ear gripping fun.

The album continues with its title track; another song breeding rich evocative shadows around poetic melodies and suggestive keys while sharing a darkly hued tale which crawls through ears into the imagination and psyche. The track is superb, a spellbinding hug as sinister as it is seductive and irresistible.

Luminous Footprint comes next with sonic and electronic spatters of sound almost as candescent as its title suggests. The bass brings a Cure like tone to the emerging track too, reinforcing its initial lure before another funk infested tango lifts feet and sparks hips into flirtatious motion. The Pigbag-esque instrumental borrows body and spirit with ease; passing both when finished on to the fleeting throbbing bass led swing of Sarcastic Fringe Head. One minute in length the track again has swift involvement drawn and carried on by the excellent Tomorrow. Maybe providing the biggest twist within Creepy Brainfood, the song is an enthralling enticement of electro rock with an eighties air recalling the likes of The Normal and Naked Lunch. Its mysterious electronics and prowling rhythms lay the seeds to a compelling infestation of the passions, attitude laced vocals and sinister almost cinematic sonic endeavour completing the inescapable lure of the thrilling encounter.

The psychedelically glazed soundscape of New Adventure brings the album to a close, Chrome again guesting with alongside DJ Tags. Their vocal craft including that of Illinspired creates a spiky and stirring jab to a track which gracefully envelops the senses if with a slight edge to its mystical floatation. It is a great end to an album which just grows and shines brighter with every listen, each venture finding something new to explore and become intimate with.

Scare The Normals are like few other bands, if any, and Creepy Brainfood a journey through unconventional pastures of sound and imagination which everyone deserves to get a helping of.

Creepy Brainfood is out now @ http://scarethenormals.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/SCARE-THE-NORMALS-60881200139

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Hells – Paradise EP

Hells_RingMasterReview

Corrosion is generally a gradual often unstoppable process but in the hands of US fury Hells, it is the swiftest undermining of the senses and emotions. Their attrition comes courtesy of their savage hardcore blend, a voracious sound making the band’s new debut EP, Paradise, one of the most punishing and thrilling things to hit the year so far. At the opposite end of the spectrum to the impression of its title, the six track release is aural and emotional dissonance fuelled by voracious anger and sonic spite. It is also a virulently addictive and rousing assault which asphyxiates and intoxicates the senses from start to finish.

Formed around two years ago, the Philadelphia hailing quartet of vocalist Larry Ragone, guitarist Brad Wallace, bassist Scott Signorino, and drummer Steve DiCicco, former members of bands such as Orchid, Transistor Transistor, Brain Dead, Wolves, Sore Saints, Psychic Teens, and Heathen Reign, soon earned the reputation of being one hellacious live experience. November of 2014 saw the release of a three track demo, a well-received platform for what now violates and thrills ears through Paradise.

The EP opens with its title track, Paradise an immediate wall of sonic and vocal abuse driven by vicious beats and an instinctively swinging groove. It has to be said that for all the punishing and creative antipathy conjured throughout the EP, it also has some of the most addictive and lively grooves and hooks heard in a long while. The outstanding track continues to ravage and incite as the rhythms become more imposing and tenacious with Ragone’s throat spilled scowls even more belligerent as they hang on twisted and venomous tendrils of guitar.

Paradise_RingMasterReview1-800-Shitfit shows itself just as intensive and irritable as it unleashes its emotive and creative animus next. A slab of barbarous punk ‘n’ roll, it grumbles and thrashes across two minutes of aural antipathy with the guitars as angry as the vocals and their roared words, while the bass is as anthemically pissed off as the scything trespass of DiCicco’s beats. Its savaging quickly makes way for that of Weather Report, which from its first breath again leaves nothing in the locker as it lashes into the listener. Grooves flirt and lacerate the senses as rhythms threateningly impose, Ragone’s raw squalls spilling irritancy with every ire drenched syllable; a combination which again simply ignites ears and an eager appetite for the threat.

As gripping and invigorating as things have been to date, the EP hits another plateau of tempting with firstly Tribute. The track is a cauldron of emotional and sonic animosity bound in the most salaciously catchy acidic grooving aligned to predatory riffs with matching rhythms.  It nags and badgers with a venomous glint in its creative eye, living up to its threat yet creating a maelstrom which is littered with the most addictive bait.

It is no different with Bad Apple, the track creating its own individual breakdown of the senses with a fluid blend of intensively assaultive and scavenging tempos around an equally unpredictable rhythmic gait stalking the listener from beginning to end. There is no escaping the hate of the song, or a wish to, though it is soon overshadowed by the brilliant EP closing enmity of Night Creeps. From its initial drone nagging of the senses, the track is rancorous alchemy, a bad-blooded proposal to brew thick lust for. Within that initial sonic niggle, DiCicco’s sticks rise to create a rousing shuffle before settling a touch as short grooves and melodic toxicity joins Ragone at his least hostile on the EP, though there is no mistaking the bitterness lining his prowling delivery. The song is hypnotic, a stylish yet bestial challenge which grinds down the defences while creating webs of contagious enterprise. At the time, it is also brewing a boldly simmering in intensity and jaundice, that growing into a fiercer rabid beast by its close.

The track is a brilliant end to a seriously arousing encounter from a band placing themselves aside certainly the likes of Pigs, Sofy Major, and Brutal Truth in one foul swoop. A must for all hardcore/noise abuse fans.

The Paradise EP is out now via Seeing Red Records @ https://hells-band.bandcamp.com/album/paradise or https://seeingredrecords.bandcamp.com/album/paradise-ep

https://www.facebook.com/givethemhells/

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Cardinal Bay – Answers EP

CARDINAL BAY_RingMasterReview

Making a potent introduction with their debut EP last year, UK post hardcore band Cardinal Bay have upped their game with its successor Answers. It is a five track proposal which growls as it dances on the ear, all of its tracks being as seriously catchy as they are emotively and aggressively forceful.

The strength of the band’s 2015 debut EP Way Back Home, released in their second year together, suggested that the Bridgwater quintet had the potential to make some big musical statements ahead and Answers certainly lives up to that promise in many ways. It comes after a year, since that first release, where the band undertook many UK tours, playing around the country alongside Amaryllis, Lost Atlanta, Chasing Cadence, and Breathe in the Silence and supported Funeral for a Friend before playing main stage at the UK’s biggest youth music festival, Butserfest. The early months of 2016 have been no different in business and success, the five-piece having made a recently acclaimed appearance on the main stage at Teddy Rocks. Now it is time for the Jonny Renshaw (Devil Sold His Soul) recorded Answers to lay down a marker for what many are calling the most exciting band to recently emerge in the post hardcore scene.

art_RingMasterReviewFrom its first moments, the Answers EP certainly does little to dismiss that type of claim, its title track slipping into ears with a melodic jangle as feisty sounds flirt with its background. Pretty soon rhythms and riffs are jostling for attention too as the strong harmonic cries of Josh Rogers colour the song’s air. It is not an over striking start but the song easily has attention held, especially once Roger’s strong vocals stroll with a throaty bassline from Jonny Dibble for company as beats jab and skirt their tempting. As the guitars of George Hill and Dave Small cast a web of melodic suggestiveness, the song simmers nicely with the occasion eruption of raw vocal growls matched by an increase in energy led by the lively beats of Matt Ward.

A strong start to the EP, the song is a sign of things to come with bigger and bolder things waiting to really spark the imagination starting with Out Of Sight. The second track has a far more imposing air to it straight away, swinging beats hitting with a heavier hand as again raw vocal squalls court the impressing melodic tones of Rogers. The band does have a flare with creating infectious pop seeded enterprise too and that also blossoms within the tenacious encounter, almost so well that its make the rawest hues of the track seem unnecessary.

Its feisty presence is matched and eclipsed by the outstanding roar of the following #Shotgun. Instantly it has a virulence and fiery edge which seduces and ignites the imagination and appetite to their strongest reactions yet. There is something familiar to the song, an indefinable essence which only adds to its drama and magnetism built on shadowy rhythms, melodic adventure, and a rampant catchiness more than conducted by Roger’s powerful delivery.

Masquerade makes a more tempered impact next though from its initial grouchy attack amidst a spiral of sonic enterprise, the track easily engages and increasingly pleases ears. It lacks the spark of its predecessors musically, the ear grabbing bite which chains attention but certainly makes up for it with the now expected great vocal quality of the band.

The EP comes to a close with There Are No Flames In Hell, a track which slowly burned itself into the passions. By its end though, and helped by round after round of its infection loaded chorus, it emerged as another strong and lingering favourite. The track contains every impressive element of the band and its sound, giving plenty more reasons why so many are waxing lyrical about Cardinal Bay. With the Answers EP to the fore, 2016 is looking like being a big year for the Somerset band.

The Answers EP is out now @ https://cardinalbay.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/CardinalBay   http://cardinalbayuk.tumblr.com/   https://twitter.com/CardinalBayUK

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com