The Pulsebeats – Fiction Non-Fiction

The Pulsebeats_RingMasterReview

Every two years or so we seem to get a new stomping encounter with The Pulsebeats; a regular occurrence, certainly over the past four years, providing so far highly memorable and rousing adventures. Nothing has changed with new album Fiction Non-Fiction either, a riotous ten track affair which has the body and spirit leaping with the band’s distinct fusion of garage and punk rock with power pop contagion.

Formed in 2010 by a quartet of musicians from Manchester and Santander in Spain, The Pulsebeats soon had an increasing flock of fans bouncing live and with their self-titled debut album of 2011. A raw but captivating romp, it awoke a new wave of attention and media interest which was further stirred up by the band’s three track 7” single Don’t Turn Your Fucking Back On Me two years later. That release immediately revealed a new imagination and diversity in the band’s songwriting and sound which has now been taken to yet another plateau with Fiction Non-Fiction. Released a couple of weeks ago by FOLC Records and Action Weekend Records, the recording of The Pulsebeats’ new roar of energetic fun saw the band return to Santander’s Drive Division Studio with Alex Pis handling production. What emerged was a collection of songs eager to reveal the band at its most musically adventurous and indeed creatively tenacious yet.

What Can I Do? is the first slice of engaging incitement on the album; a welcome instantly wrapping ears in jangly guitar and crisp beats. The distinctive British tones of Nathan are soon adding to the already potent lure of the song, his and fellow guitarist, Luis’ riffs and hooks surrounding his tones with matching zeal and expression The track is a tidy slice of power pop mixed with sixties spiced R&B, a warm an catchy start soon eclipsed by Dead School Marching Band. New wave like guitar insurgency rubs the senses first; their almost duelling bait soon accompanied by the swinging rhythms of drummer Ral and the almost haughty bassline of Alex. In no time, the outstanding song has feet and hips bound in its virulence whilst a Who/early Jam hue blossoms to ignite the imagination. It is also an inventively busy proposal, vocal growls and writhing harmonies colluding with spiky hooks and tangy grooves to add to its ear gripping devilry.

Cover_RingMasterReviewThe punk ‘n’ roll of Eyes On You leaps straight from the closing breath of its predecessor, the track a glorious old school incitement with a touch of early Buzzcocks meets The Freshies to it; indeed Nathan adding a Howard Devoto like toning to his raw vocal persuasion. Like the previous track, it quickly and easily has body and passions involved while showing more of the variety in sound shaping Fiction Non-Fiction.

The following All I Give also has some of that nostalgic spicing to certainly its acidic hooks and uncluttered body, bringing a lighter infection of pop ‘n’ roll for its magnetic chorus, while Carrie-Anne is a less forceful proposal creating a flirtatious smoulder with sultry surf like melodies within a power pop/new wave hug with just a touch of The Only Ones to it. Both songs easily command undiluted interest and an increasingly greedier appetite for the album, if without quite matching up to the major heights of those before them and the thumping garage rock ‘n’ roll of Baby Girl. The anthemic punches of beats alone have limbs involved, vocals and riffs taking care of the rest of quickly seduced attention.

The mischievous nature of the band in word and sound is never far from the surface of the album and especially dynamic and irresistible in The Man Without A Head. The stomping slice of rock ‘n’ roll is an epidemic of sonic contagion with a host of additional strands drawn from blues, vintage R&B, and pop punk. Many tracks have a claim for best track honours within Fiction Non-Fiction, this one of the most vocal though so too is its successor, the resourcefully infectious and melodically lusty September Calendar Girl.

To be honest most tracks create an unforgettable peak within the lofty stature of the album, the glorious Everybody Wants Some intoxicating punk rock revelry almost aflame with raw energy and attitude to match earlier heights. It offers an uncomplicated two and a half minutes of breath-taking and seriously addictive rock ‘n roll which just ignites body and soul.

Completed by the even briefer punk riot of The Ballad Of Medicine Stu, again a track impossible not to get fully involved in, Fiction Non-Fiction is the kind of release you turn to for pure fun, knowing it will not disappoint in sound, adventure, or attitude. As for The Pulsebeats, they just get better and better, which means so do their records which Fiction Non-Fiction can testify.

Fiction Non-Fiction is available now on CD and download through Folc Records/Action Weekend Records and @ https://thepulsebeats.bandcamp.com/album/fiction-non-fiction

https://www.facebook.com/The-Pulsebeats-378049614144

Pete Ringmaster 11/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.co

Bootlegs – Ekki fyrir viðkvæma

Bootlegs_RingMasterReview

With the band recently inking a worldwide management deal with GlobMetal Promotions, we thought a look at Bootlegs’ recent album, Ekki fyrir viðkvæma, was in order.  Formed in 1986 and soon becoming one of the bigger names in Icelandic metal history over the next five years or so, Bootlegs released two highly praised albums in that period before disbanding in 1991. Since then the band has come and gone through a couple of brief comebacks before returning more permanently in 2012. Released last year, Ekki fyrir viðkvæma is the Reykjavik quartet’s latest incitement of raw and ferocious thrash metal, a release metal fans will not want to be missing out on.

WC Monster and their self-titled second album, released 1989 and 1990 respectively, certainly pushed Bootlegs from national success towards recognition upon the broader metal map as too appearances on compilation albums over the next couple of years and a live presence which saw the band break into the likes of Denmark. After coming to an end, the band did come back together for a big reunion concert which was recorded and subsequently released as a live album a few years later in 2006. Before its release though, Bootlegs were already active again, returning in 2004 for a two to three year presence.  Then in 2010, they arose again with original members back; the fresh return followed by releases of the band’s first two albums in 2014 via Minotauro Records. Last year saw Bootlegs enter the studio for their first recordings in over two decades, and emerging with the rather impressive and rousing Ekki fyrir viðkvæma.

With the vocal roars of guitarists Jón ‘Junior’ Símonarsson and Jón Örn ‘Nonni ‘ Sigurðsson to the fore and its energy and intensity driven by the rhythmic predation of bassist Ingimundur ‘Elli’ Ellert Þorkellsson and drummer Kristján ‘Stjuni’ Ásvaldsson, album and sound is old school, thrash in its irritable prime. It is unafraid to offer some punk attitude too, at times songs breaching a Suicidal Tendencies like punkiness, but for the main and in its individual style, Ekki Fyrir Viðkvæma is the perfect fit for tastes bred on the likes of Voivod, Exodus, Metallica, Slayer, and Subhumans.

Front_RingMasterReviewFrom the hungrily abrasive and riotous punk ‘n’ roll of Gervigleði er ógleði, the album has ears and appetite in league with its ferocious intent. It is a great opener quickly matched in success and persuasion by the thrash prowl of Fullur á Facebook. Grooves and hooks collude with rapier like swings from Stjuni in the second song, luring in the listener before uncaging a ravenous assault and devilment reminding of the crossover thrash sounds of the previously mentioned California hailing band.

As the likes of the senses nagging KúkurPissOgÆl and the glorious exploits of Bootlegs fyrir börnin come and go, it is fair to say that major surprises are few yet fierce temptation and unbridled enjoyment unmistakable and inescapable. Within the second of the two, there is also something very familiar about certain melodies and flavoursome hooks yet all escape comparison to anyone in particular as the track steals ears and passions with ease. There is an occasional sense of early Stam1na, passing essences fleetingly bringing the Finnish band to mind as the track provides the first major pinnacle within the album.

Tribute to Thrash is one of the few English sung tracks and more than lives up to its title, swinging along with a snarl and swagger while being as multi-flavoured as its predecessor. With some great guitar interplay involved it is followed by Eitur naðra which explores a darker and heavier canvas of textures and character as sonic flames vein its intimidating posture and tone. The track is just one more highly memorable proposal, whether stalking the listener or in a rampage of niggling riffs and the snakiest of toxic grooves, and swiftly irresistible as too the in the face predation and roar of the excellent Gjallarhorn.

By this point it is fair to say that Ekki fyrir viðkvæma had us hooked, sharing physical and vocal, where we could language wise, involvement with instinctive eagerness. The pair of Fórnarlamb tískunnar and Kjörkassasvín only add to the album’s temptation and uncompromising thrills; both tracks providing an immediate and merciless trespass as anthemic as they are grouchy. They are highly addictive proposals carrying an array of imagination pleasing twists and turns backed by the band’s individual craft; the latter especially intriguing and devilish in shape and resources.

Making less of a dramatic and lingering impression is Poser though fair to say that its antagonistic attack leaves only satisfaction in its wake before Haleluja adds its own creative incitement and SOD III uncages the album’s shortest and most hostile offering yet. Again both leave pleasure full without matching earlier triumphs with the closing Ó Reykjavík providing a final spirit arousing galvanic punk ‘n’ roll stomp to greedily devour.

It is a great end to an excellent release. Ekki fyrir viðkvæma might not be the best thrash album you will have heard this past year or so, though it is in with a real shout, but it is undoubtedly on the frontline of the most enjoyable and ridiculously easy to return to propositions you will come across.

Ekki fyrir viðkvæma is available @ https://bootlegsthrash.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.facebook.com/bootlegsiceland

Pete RingMaster 11/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.co

Two Skies – When the Storm Hits EP

TwoSkiesWTSHartwork_RingMasterReview

Almost a year after the success of their senses enveloping single, Feel / Broken Hearts, British psych/alternative rock trio Two Skies have released an arguably even more immersive and certainly enthralling encounter in the shape of second EP, When the Storm Hits. Containing four tracks of varied yet mutually dramatic proposals, the release is a fascinating confirmation and further evidence of the band’s creative imagination and persuasive craft.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Dan Cutts, bassist Jamie Cheetham, and drummer Oliver Harrap, the Sheffield hailing Two Skies has lured attention and praise through a host of singles since emerging with their first track in 2011. Fair to say though, the Red EP of 2014 sparked greater intrigue, being backed and its sound pushed on again through a couple more singles including the previously mentioned Feel. It explored a new creative breath to the band’s already absorbing sound, a landscape of invention and emotion as haunting as it was sonically mesmeric. When the Storm Hits follows in the same vein but takes the attributes of its predecessor to new imaginative and impacting heights.

Live the band has become a seriously renowned proposal for their fiery sound and dynamics too, with shows alongside the likes of Toy, Wooden Shjips, Ultrasound, Howling Bells, Six by Seven, Joy Formidable, and Johnny Marr under their belts. They are raw essences which equal attract and transfix within When the Storm Hits, starting with its title track. Straight away a brooding bassline strolls within an atmospheric synth laid caress veined by the melancholy of wispy strains of guitar, that emotion matched in the expression of Cutts’ swiftly impressing vocals too. Like a slightly portentous mist, the song expands and rolls in over the senses, bursts of intensity in its climate shared by cacophonous guitar enterprise and an intrusive sonic shimmer. It is a magnetic affair as inciting for the imagination as it is for ears and emotions.

The great start is soon surpassed by the outstanding Drone Attack NP 19. Straight away there is an air of energy to it which in a handful of seconds more is powering the swinging stride of the song led by another throbbing and infectious bassline. Harrap’s beats match the virulent gait of Cheetham’s bass as around them guitars cast a web of melodic tendrils amidst a nagging but welcoming sonic wash. There is also a slightly nostalgic feel to the song; eighties band Modern English especially coming to mind in certain moments, though there is no mistaking that the song, as the EP, is inescapably distinct to Two Skies as it tenacious saunters along roaring in voice and sound.

The similarly tantalising Arrows comes next, offering a less urgent senses badgering presence but with an equally contagious catchiness to its body and tone. Cutts again captivates in voice as potently as the sounds surrounding his expressive and emotive delivery; keys and guitars weaving another tapestry of atmospheric rapture and melodic reflection through gentle sways and rousing crescendos.

Hypnotist brings the EP to a fine close with a cloud of mesmeric sound surrounding the song’s slightly tempestuous character. It is a charming proposal with a fiery edge and heart; a track as seductive as it is imposing with the great almost drone like persistence which lines much of the band’s encounters as riveting and tempting as ever.

The When the Storm Hits EP is undoubtedly the finest hour, or sixteen odd minutes, of Two Skies; a band simply becoming more individual and compelling with every release.

The When the Storm Hits EP is out now via Sister 9 Recordings @ https://twoskies.bandcamp.com/album/when-the-storm-hits

http://www.twoskies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Two-Skies/20306313311   https://twitter.com/TwoSkiesBand

Pete RingMaster 11/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Lemonhaze – Mercury

lemonhaze_RingMasterReview

Continuing their ascent within the British underground towards broader cast spotlights, Scottish quartet Lemonhaze recently released new single Mercury. Pulsating and roaring with the blending of indie and alternative rock with Neo-psychedelia hues, the song shimmers like a sun breaking from dark emotive shadows to transfix and infect the senses.

In many ways, the single offers few surprises in that it is another slice of the rich and adventurous sound the Paisley band is already becoming renowned for. But as with all their releases to date, there is new freshness in air and character from that of its predecessors as Lemonhaze continue to push their songwriting and boundaries.

Formed late 2012/early 2013, Lemonhaze consists of Gerald Doran (lead vocals and rhythm guitar), Steven Hillcoat (lead guitar and vocals), Jonny Adams (bass and vocals), and Jamie McLachlan (drums and percussion). Their first year saw the band become a keen supported live presence on the Glasgow music scene, its successor marked by the band expanding their presence and over time gracing venues such as Manchester Academy, King Tuts, Oran Mor, Maggie May’s and many more. The Say Goodbye to Felix EP of 2013 poked at even wider recognition which subsequent singles have only added their creative weight to. Now it is Mercury working its lively melodic charm with no doubt more success and attention waiting for the band through it.

Keys caress ears on the song’s first breath, guitars and rhythms leaping in on the third with the pulsating bassline of Adams especially vocal and inviting. Doran’s vocals equally have the kind of natural invitation to them which is hard to ignore, both rich elements enticing within the melodic smoulder of keys and the elegant jangle of the guitars. Those keys also bring a great eighties spice to the mix whilst the celestial harmonies which seduce throughout hold a hint of The Communards to them.

The track continues to busily provide a tapestry of textures and infectious enterprise, its eager stroll enticing feet and hips to get as involved as ears and imagination by the time of the song’s departure; to be honest well before it takes its leave.

Mercury is a song impossible not to take a real liking to, the kind of rock pop which even if their style is not someone’s prime cup of tea is likely to still get under the skin with craft and virulent temptation.

Mercury is out now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/mercury-single/id1107635218

http://www.lemonhaze.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/lemonhazeMUSIC   https://twitter.com/lemonhazeband

Pete RingMaster 11/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com