I Plead Irony – The Solution Is The Problem

IPI_RingMasterReview

Just a handful of months short of three years ago, UK trio I Plead Irony uncaged one of the most rousing and creatively imaginative rock ‘n’ roll albums heard that year and to be honest since. This Statement Is False was compellingly equipped with ferocious and virulently contagious alternative and punk rock roars which, though frequently acclaimed, never quite got the rich attention it and the band deserved. Fair to say though, the Farnborough hailing band was certainly recognised as one of the UK’s most exciting emerging bands by a great many. Now the biggest spotlights are under serious tempting once again with the release of the band’s second album The Solution Is The Problem, it another creatively raucous and energetically incendiary slab of sound and invention to get lustful over.

In many ways, The Solution Is The Problem takes over from where its predecessor left off; imagination stirring and inventively mischievous songs to the fore but swiftly it reveals the broader landscape of creative tenacity and imagination now colouring the fresh maturity in songwriting and sound. Managing to provide more of the riveting same whilst unleashing a whole new character of insatiable adventure, the album is an inescapable arousing of spirit, imagination, and greedily devouring ears.

Formed in the early days of 2011, I Plead Irony was a growing force on the south eastern live scene from its first steps. Sharing time with its members’ other projects such as Ipanema, The Fins, Atomic Garden, and Welcome The Howling Tones, the band released This Statement Is False in 2013, their debut mixed by French producer Guillaume Doussaud. It awoke a new wave of national ears and appetites to the presence of the band and in turn a new host of fans to excite with their renowned live prowess. Now The Solution Is The Problem is the bait to really stir things up; an enticement which has all the qualities and potential to make the threesome of vocalist/bassist Rauf Jordan, guitarist/backing vocalist Paul McDonald, and drummer/backing vocalist Lawrence Arnold, the name on eagerly sharing lips and recommendations.

The album impressively opens with Tiny Violin which enters on a rusty cinematic coaxing. Soon after, a wiry guitar invitation winds around ears, hefty rhythmic swipes and a brooding atmosphere soon in close attention. In no time, the track is strolling with eager intent through ears, the excellent vocal presence of Jordan leading a thick mix of textures and flavours busying themselves within the song. There is a touch of Hundred Reasons meets Japanese Fighting Fish to the track, a spice within a sound which is swiftly and increasingly recognised as prime I Plead Irony. It is simply superb, a rousing and dramatic proposal thick in emotion and intensity entangled in strands of inventive endeavour.

art_RingMasterReviewThe potent expanse of diversity within the album is soon beginning to reveal itself with What If. From vocals to sound, it carries a rockabilly meets melodic rock ingenuity which simply seduces as the track, with the bass on the front foot, prowls ears. Hooks litter every lure of the song’s invitation whilst a virulence of emotive and creative dexterity infests the imagination and psyche. As its predecessor, the track is aural gold and an unstoppable manipulation of the body and listener participation, much as Not The Face which follows straight after. It too is quickly in command, its buoyant infectiousness aligned to imposing aggression and anthemic tenacity with a Billy Talent like resourcefulness to it all.

Already the album is an addiction in the throes of success and strongly backed by the feisty persuasion of Sisyphus and even more so its successor Just A Machine. The first of the two is a relatively reserved and reined proposal but with the bracing edge and slightly cantankerous nature that frequents the I Plead Irony sound. If without sparking the same lusty response as those before it, the sonically fiery song has ears and pleasure full before the second of the two steals the limelight with its Foo Fighters toned incitement. From the delicious crankiness of the bass and the lung roaring vocals of Jordan through to the maze of off-kilter dynamics and ever evolving energy, the track is an anthem to stir the passions and a tapestry of unpredictable invention to ignite the imagination.

What’s Best For You bounces along next with a Jimmy Eat World infectiousness and agitation though yet again any references offered are mere hues in a thick slice of I Plead Irony originality, as evidenced by the rumbling rock ‘n’ roll of Unsung Champions straight after. Jordan and Arnold needs little time to create a web of rhythmic seduction and intimidation which McDonald binds in melodic and sonic enterprise as the vocalist’s vocals shine with narrative and expression. There is nothing about the song not to greedily like; every chord and rhythmic roll the prelude to a theatre of discord lined imagination and spirit inflaming flirtation, it all honed into rock ‘n’ roll alchemy.

The body is soon lost to the addictive shuffle and contagion of Prove Me Wrong; its imposing catchiness wonderfully aligned to a metal inspired trespass as magnetic as the track’s virulence is epidemic like. The song is also another reflection of the bigger and bolder landscape to the band’s writing and invention, an aspect pushed further by the equally intrusive and dynamic Divide[…]Collide. A tenacious snarl is never far from the surface, even as a melodic saunter works with the darker tone of voice and emotion , but similarly the band’s striking imagination is consistently there leaning in on every unexpected twist and resourceful turn of the excellent encounter.

The Solution Is The Problem is brought to a thrilling close by firstly the web of intrigue and galvanic textures making up the Kill The Crow and finally Tragedy Debut, a glorious slice of punk ‘n’ roll which sends the listener this way and that whilst having them, like a puppeteer, physically and emotionally dance. Both tracks hit the sweet spot with the closer especially exhilarating with its invasive and memorable theatre of blues, punk, and muscular alternative rock.

Such the might of This Statement Is False, it was never going to be easy to follow it up but The Solution Is The Problem makes light work of the challenge with its bigger and bolder, not forgetting thrilling plateau of invention and persuasion

The Solution Is The Problem is out now via Rose Coloured Records @ https://ipleadirony.bandcamp.com/

http://www.ipleadirony.com   https://www.facebook.com/ipleadirony   https://twitter.com/ipleadirony

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Except One – Haunted Humanity

ExceptOne_RingMasterReview

The past couple of years has seen a striking amount of potential loaded and highly enjoyable bands emerging from the French underground metal scene to which you can now add another in the imposing shape of Except One. Creating a concussive yet persistently engaging proposal merging melodic death metal with metalcore and other extreme flavours, the Paris quintet had already nudged spotlights with a previous EP but now is as good as stalking them with Haunted Humanity and its seven tracks of attention grabbing voracious metal.

The Except One sound is not necessarily unique but carries plenty of twists and imaginative moments which command extra attention.  The band’s five track debut EP, O.M.N.I. #1, provided a potent introduction though it is Haunted Humanity which it is easier to imagine awakening ears and focus the way of vocalist Estelle, guitarists Junior and Ad’ibou, bassist Boris, and drummer Fanch’.

It opens with Rise and a sonic embrace around the accusing yet coaxing voice of Estelle. In no time the track is a tsunami of intensity and riffs led by the impressing tone, which by now has become throat grazing, and roar of the singer. Grooves and sonic endeavour vein and wind around rhythmic hostility as the track hits top gear but equally a swiftly pleasing invention emerges which sees moments of predatory calm and imposing sidesteps reshape the hellacious assault of the excellent track. Not ground-breaking but perpetually striking, it provides a stirring start to the release which continues with Lost.

The second track instantly grinds upon and nags the senses as guitars lead its invasive character. The dynamics of drums and bass which ignited the opener are more reserved initially but build in tenacity and imposing adventure to match the brewing imagination of the guitars and vocal rapacity of Estelle. Ears and appetite are sold in no time, more so as a passage of evocative calm is shaped by provocative melodic hooks and clean vocal tempting. As the first, the track is bordering irresistible before Schizofriend takes over with its spirals of niggling grooves and hefty rhythmic swipes. A great blend of clean and abrasive vocals again only add to the infectious nature and drama of a track, the band also flirting with post hardcore to add to its arsenal of flavours and textures.

Haunted Humanity_RingMasterReviewRevenge is a maelstrom of riffs and rhythmic antagonism driven by the ear catching prowess of Estelle and the equally alluring craft and enterprise of Junior and Ad’ibou which ensures one of the more formula sculpted tracks stands out as potently as the more experimental ones such as Elm Street which follows. It is another seeing the band weave and hone a broad array of creative spices and genre flavours into one rabid and merciless incitement. Further coloured by melodic and harmonic imagination, it grouchily bristles as it entices and seduces as it gnaws on the senses.

Personal tastes most greedily take to the tracks which see Except One pushing their imagination and undercurrent of diversity the most, Disease another where a host of styles get entangled as eventfully as the results snare ears and pleasure. As much as that merging of flavours brings the band’s songs alive so too does the vocal variety which blends to captivating effect and the moments of unpredictability that at times just does not go far enough.

Completed by the barbarous and simultaneously evocative exploits of 7even, the hellacious charm and captivating tempest of Haunted Humanity leaves satisfaction bursting at the seams. The release is a signpost to the potential and already healthy invention within Except One and a sound which may be is not yet unique but has much to suggest it might just be a matter of time before the French band majorly steps from the crowd. With more enjoyable offerings like this along the way though, we can happily wait for the moment.

Haunted Humanity is out now @ https://exceptone.bandcamp.com/album/haunted-humanity

http://www.exceptone.fr/   https://www.facebook.com/ExceptOneOfficial   https://twitter.com/except_one

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Skox – Years of Legions

Skox_RingMasterReview

If you have a sweet tooth for raw thrash metal or a soft spot for ravenous death metal, Years of Legions has plenty to eagerly embrace. To be honest, the new album from French band Skox has much for fierce metal fans in general to get their teeth in to across ten tracks which maybe do not always majorly surprise but definitely get the juices flowing.

Formed in 2003 and with their current line-up in place since 2010, the Lyon hailing Skox has shared the stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Hatesphere, Loudblast, Destinity, Blockheads, Mumakill, and No Return over the years whilst also making successful appearances at festivals such as Sylak and Ragnard Rock. An early EP also caught attention but it is with Years of Legions that it is easy to expect real attention gathering. With a sound inspired by thrash and raw metal from across the decades and an album “whose martial tones would convey the band’s ambition through the metaphor of war”, Skox is ready and equipped to wage war on a broader landscape.

The album opens with Entering the Battlefield…, a prelude and lead into individual battles posing as songs. Air and land is swiftly busy with the weapons and intent of confrontation, rhythms raising the flag as melodies lay down the sizzling colour and suggestion of things to come as the instrumental heads straight into the jaws of the album’s title track. A stable yet imposing start to the second track is soon a hellacious onslaught of vicious rhythms and violent riffs matched in grizzly kind by the tones of vocalist Jean-Charles Dupin. It is stirring stuff, a visceral dark thrash incitement driven by the hefty swings of drummer Arnaud Neyret and the grouchy bassline of Florent Claudel. Within this, guitarists Vincent Morelle and Gildas Turpin unite to savage and seduce with sonic and melodic enterprise, the band creating warfare across a rousing challenge with plenty to be beguiled by.

Years of legions_RingMasterReviewClaudel’s bass has ears and appetite enslaved in no time on the following Cell Swelling too; its throaty snarl delicious bait which is quickly matched in steely kind by invasive riffs. Provoking and enticing with every touch, the song scowls and bruises throughout but tempers its merciless intent with great unpredictable side steps into calmer rapacious exploits often led by that irresistible bass tempting. As with its predecessor, the song is not re-inventing the wheel but a fresh and individual character to each is the predominate spice which equally stirs the spirit across the likes of Running Out of Time and Thrashtastik. Amongst influences listed are the likes of Slayer, Testament, and Kreator; flavours which especially come to mind in the forcibly contagious first of the pair with its compelling trespass of a swing. Its successor is relatively less open in influence as it uncages a bedlamic shuffle of thrash voracity and ridiculously catchy endeavour. It is a death dance, a flirtation to destruction and as the previous track, one thrilling provocation.

Engine of Death is a track which stalks the senses, prowling around them with toxicity slavering grooves and brutal rhythmic teeth as the increasingly enjoyable growls and animosity fuelled squalls of Dupin rage. By its close, ears and senses feel like road kill, trodden into its sonic rancor and acid laced melodic dust before Road 666 runs over both again with its own eventful juggernaut of lethal swipes and carnivorous riffs. As with others, Skox infuses the song with tendrils of fiery and evocative melodic invention which aligns with the antagonistic side perfectly; the extremes sharing song and attention like brothers in arms.

One bassline is all March of the Dead took to spark an insatiable hunger in the imagination and appetite, its opening trap the doorway into a bestial consumption of ears whilst Smash Your Enemy matches its predatory prowess with its own particular militarist quarrel. Throughout both Skox again turns familiar essences into their own enthralling and highly incendiary sonic warfare and once more leave a certain hunger for more.

Closing with the instrumentally descriptive ‘epilogue’ of Leaving the Killingfield, the riveting album is an increasingly impressing and rousing encounter revealing more temptation with every listen. Skox is a name hard to forget from a band with a sound which seemingly has the same property going by the effect of Years of Legions over time.

Years of Legions is out now across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Skoxband

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/