Adelitas Way – Getaway

AW_RingMasterReview

Adelitas Way has persistently shown themselves capable of writing and creating anthemic roars that instinctively ignite the spirit and adrenaline. From their self-titled debut album and tracks like Invincible, the US band has early on uncaged impassioned and dynamically persuasive proposals. With new album Getaway though, they have hit a new peak. From start to finish, it is a conveyor belt of rousing proposals, as sturdy and aggressive as they are melodically contagious. It is probably fair to say that the Adelitas Way sound has never been one close to re-inventing the wheel, but they and certainly these ears have no issue when body and spirit is relentlessly given a shot of the band’s fresh and anthemic virulence.

Getaway is the fourth album from the 2006 band, and as suggested another in a line of highly persuasive and captivating releases. Whether they have hit the personal sweet spot or not, all have gone to establish the Las Vegas quartet as one eagerly devoured proposition on record and indeed live where they have shared stages with the likes of Guns N’ Roses, Shinedown, Creed, Alter Bridge, Three Days Grace, Chevelle, Theory of a Deadman, Breaking Benjamin, The Pretty Reckless, Godsmack, Staind, Flyleaf and many more.

The successor to Stuck of 2013, the Johnny K (Disturbed, Staind) produced Getaway sees the foursome of Rick DeJesus, Tre Stafford, Robert Zakaryan, and Andrew Cushing in no mood to hold back on their emotive intensity and sonic dexterity. The evidence is immediate as the band’s new single Bad Reputation, and first taken from the album, launches at ears with infectious bait. Choppy riffs and similarly tempting rhythms immediately press suggestively upon the senses as the always welcome tones of vocalist DeJesus step forward. Inspired by his own feelings about a reputation he has earned over the past few years, his reflections come entangled in a web of spicy melodies and snapping hooks within a climate of sound which builds small but effective crescendos of energy and intensity.

COVER_RingMasterReviewIt is a great start which barely waivers over the next stretch of songs starting with the album’s title track. The band’s hard rock bred sound is in feisty mood from its first breath, almost irritable in its sonic jangle backed by attitude lined rhythms. Increasingly fiery yet equally catchy, especially around its sizzling chorus, the track has feet and emotions quickly involved and in time exhausted, though they get a chance to relax with the sultry smoulder of Good Die Young. The fiercely energetic tracks always emerge as personal favourites across an Adelitas Way encounter but as proven here, the band is very accomplished at creating emotively and sonically incisive balladry. Expectantly it does come with a raw edge and dramatic intensity which only helps it make a potent impact as enjoyment flies high.

Low brings a great grouchiness to its riffs and nature next, guitars almost carnivorous in tone as a Sick Puppies like flame of melodic and harmonic energy emerges from within the song’s growl. As many tracks, ears feel like they are meeting up with an old friend, being enveloped in a recognisable infectiousness which adds colour to the band’s blaze of heavily pleasing and fresh enterprise. By the end of the first minute, vocal participation is inevitable, a temptation most tracks are equipped with as shown by the volatile roar of Put You in Place with its web of spidery steely grooves and the mercilessly contagious I Get Around. A resonating bassline invitingly groans from the heart of the second of the pair, its dark hues a gripping tempering and spark to the tempestuous and boisterous roar around it. Not alone in showering the senses in serious infectiousness, the song epitomises the power, attitude, and rousing ferocity of the band’s sound, and equally its rock pop prowess.

Across the tenaciously excitable Filthy Heart with its blues spiced sonic winery and the mellower coaxing of Harbor the Fugitive, band and album, maybe without matching earlier heights, has ears and firmly attentive whilst Sometimes You’re Meant to Get Used really stirs things up again with its tantalising blend of rapaciously snarling textures and melodic revelry bound in emphatically infectious imagination.

The album concludes with firstly the blues rock flavoured Shame, an enticing flame of enterprise which again might not create the same lustful reactions as others but with a whiff of Bowie-esque toning to parts of the vocals, only holds attention firm before Deserve This twists and turns with robust rhythms and crunchy riffery leading its fractious yet anthemically layered tapestry of striking sound and endeavour.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release where major surprises are low but invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is nonstop incitement. Getaway is the most rounded and fertile release from Adelitas Way, and for us, the most fiercely enjoyable so far.

Getaway is out now via most online stores and @ http://adelitaswayshop.bigcartel.com/category/cd

https://www.facebook.com/adelitasway   https://twitter.com/adelitasway

Pete RingMaster 07/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Monster Truck – Sittin’ Heavy

pic by Brooks Reynolds

pic by Brooks Reynolds

Yet again Monster Truck lives up to the suggested weightiness of their name with their sound in new album Sittin’ Heavy. The eleven track encounter is a rousing rock ‘n’ roll roar embracing a landscape of bold styles and flavours. It is an adventure the Canadian band’s fans have become accustomed to and helped lead their Juno Award nominated debut album Furiosity to rich acclaim and hordes of new appetites two years or so back. Sittin’ Heavy carries on the muscular work of its predecessor, unleashing broad and robust rock ‘n’ roll you can only give full attention to.

The Hamilton, Ontario hailing Monster Truck quickly began stirring up local attention and support when emerging in 2009, backing it up with the release of their Gus Van Go and Werner F (The Stills, Priestess, Hollerado) produced self-titled EP the following year. The band linked up with producer Eric Ratz (Billy Talent, Cancer Bats, Three Days Grace) for its successor, The Brown EP in 2011, with surrounding singles pushing the band into the Top 10 on Canadian Rock radio. That initial live success has only accelerated and grown across the years too; tours across North America and Canada as well as supporting shows and festival appearances seeing the quartet sharing stages with the likes of Slash, Deep Purple, Guns N’ Roses, The Sheepdogs, Alice in Chains, ZZ Top, Buckcherry, Rival Sons and many more.

Furiosity put Monster Truck on bigger heavy rock/metal maps with its release in 2013, something the again Ratz recorded/co-produced Sittin’ Heavy will surely stir up and exploit further. Their first offering since signing with Mascot Records, the album charges at and through ears with opener Why Are You Not Rocking. Jabbing beats instantly grip attention before being quickly joined by fiery grooves around hungry riffs. Hitting its rousing stroll in moments, the track is a contagious stomp with the lead vocals of bassist Jon Harvey growling and enticing from within the busy web of Jeremy Widerman’s grooves and the seriously coaxing organ lures of Brandon Bliss. With drummer Steve Kiely inciting further involvement through his rapier like swings, band and song has hips, appetite, and energies ablaze with ease.

art_RingMasterReviewSittin’ Heavy is off to a mighty start which continues as Don’t Tell Me How To Live steps up next; its blues spiced grooves and tenaciously pressing riffs offering potent bait as they crowd the robustly snarling tones of Harvey. The song’s air is almost woozy with the melodic liquor fuelling the richly enticing grooving, their flirtation the lead into the suggestiveness of Widerman’s sonic endeavour and imagination. As the first, the track is a magnetic affair pleasing and simultaneously setting up the emotions and appetite for the even thicker weave of spicy textures and sultry invention that is She’s A Witch. As its predecessor, the song has a groove built net which quickly envelops ears as hips and feet are tempted and urged by the funk infused hooks and flighty flames of blues resourcefulness.

A southern seeded celebration is laid out by For The People next, its character and sound a familiar persuasion yet distinctly sculpted with Monster Truck invention and passion whilst Black Forest allows a rest for the body and inspiration for the imagination with its mellow yet still slightly tempestuous air and reflection. As with the last song, there is a sixties/seventies scented essence to the song; hues which align to a modern heartfelt blues seducing before having to make way for the wonderful discord twisted introduction of Another Man’s Shoes and subsequently its muscularly imposing and evocative body. The track is rock ‘n’ roll at its feverish yet controlled best, another skilful tapestry of textures and energies which Monster Truck, in this album alone, show themselves so accomplished at weaving.

From one pinnacle to another as Things Gets Better strides in with a keys sparked swagger that infests every aspect of the song. There is no escaping the unrelentingly persuasive and anthemic prowess of a song which never breaks into a riot of energy and sound but has the senses and spirit as aroused as if it had. The track also adds more of the flavoursome variety that makes up the album. As great as it is though, it and every song making up Sittin’ Heavy, gets outshone by the sensational incitement of The Enforcer. Straight from the big swinging rhythms which bound in under the control of Kiely, submission to its fiery charm is inevitable and even more assured as the soulful fire of sound and harmonies unite to seduce and stir the spirit. Grooves are almost toxic such their winy intoxication whilst the vocals of Harvey, backed by the rest of the band, simply provide virulent bait. Add biting riffs, piecing hooks, and more creative swing led by the bass revelry of Harvey, and you have one of the most incendiary tracks you are likely to hear this year.

To The Flame takes ears into a tantalising mix of sludge and stoner-esque adventure next. The track almost crawls over the senses whilst leaving a glaze of volcanic seduction, led by Widerman’s sonic lattice and the smothering allure of Bliss’ keys. Compelling the listener into full involvement, the track’s sweltering landscape adds another peak to the lofty range of the album, its success matched and surpassed by the devilishly creative and expressive throes of New Soul. The song has all the hectic and inflamed elements that makes the Monster Truck sound; elements which collude with individual craft and anthemic mastery for lusty rock ‘n’ roll to get hot and sweaty to.

Completed by the gentle, in relation to other songs, emotive embrace of Enjoy The Time, the irresistible Sittin’ Heavy is a band revelling in the varied strains of rock ‘n’ roll and their imagination in uniting them with their own invention. That in turn has ears and emotions similarly making feverish merry to the results.

Sittin’ Heavy is out now via Mascot Records, available digitally as well as on CD and Vinyl (which includes bonus track Midnight) across most online stores.

http://www.ilovemonstertruck.com/   https://www.facebook.com/ilovemonstertruck   https://twitter.com/monster_truck

Pete RingMaster 07/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Church of Misery – And Then There Were None

COM-promo_RingMasterReview

As much as anticipation, there was plenty of extra intrigue involved leading to the release of And Then There Were None, the new album from Church of Misery. The sixth full-length from the Japan bred band, it is also the first since bassist and mastermind Tatsu Mikami was forced to assemble a new line-up a year after the unleashing of the 2013 album, Thy Kingdom Scum. It was an obstacle which has seemingly made little difference to the band as in And Then There Were None they have come up with one ferociously compelling provocation.

Another reason for that intrigue was that Mikami has linked up with musicians outside of his homeland for the first time; enlisting Blood Farmers guitarist Dave Szulkin, Earthride drummer Eric Little (ex-Internal Void) and Repulsion frontman (and former Cathedral bassist) Scott Carlson on vocals. It is easy to assume this was a challenge in itself in the creation of the album due to distances between members and indeed the bassist when talking about the album admitted, “It was a challenge because there was not much time to make this record—only two weeks,” going on to add, “One week for rehearsals and then one week to record all materials.” With Carlson providing vocals for an album for the first time in almost 30 years, it seems like it was a project pushing each member to their creative edge; an essence which has gone so me way to giving an extra spark and bite to the “blood-soaked trip through homicidal hell.”

Fuelled by the tales and bloody mayhem of killers both infamous and obscure, And Then There Were None opens up with The Hell Benders. Emerging from a viscerally sanguineous opening, funk spiced melodies quickly seduce the imagination as nagging rhythms rap the senses. It is a mellow and tantalising entrance which is soon spilling suggestively sultry grooves and incisive beats as Carlson’s growling delivery mixes it with the sweltering climate of doom/sludge bred heavy rock ‘n’ roll. The intoxicating invention of the guitars is invasive yet at times provides a mesmeric lure for a perpetually captivating frame to the barbarous lyrics with the bass of Mikami bridging the two with its heavily alluring tone and rapacious shadowing of voice and sonic enterprise.

COM-and_then_there_were_FRONT_RingMasterReviewThe gripping start is reinforced by the almost carnal resourcefulness and snarling nature of Make Them Die Slowly. Riffs immediately provide a tasty intrusion, seeming to relish their antagonistic presence within a web of sinister yet seductive grooves. With vocals across the band stalking the imagination too, the track reveals a punk infused attitude to its Crowbar meets High on Fire meets Earthride like trespass.

Doctor Death prowls ears and imagination next, inspiration coming from British killer Harold Shipman. As thoughts are reminded and provoked, guitars again spread a lattice of juicily enticing grooves aligned to forceful rhythms as Carlson shares the insidious deeds. Enthralling and increasingly irresistible, the sonically humid track makes way for the funkier revelry of River Demon, where bass and drums go on a rampage of addictive and incendiary rhythms. A slab of volatile and bruising groove bound devilment which enslaves appetite and energies from start to finish, the track is a vampiric treat leaving the body and senses exhausted with its blues soaked punk ‘n’ roll.

Through the muggier sonic climate of Confessions Of An Embittered Soul and southern soaked Suicide Journey, the album reveals more varied hues to colour its melodically toxic and addictive body. The first of the two has the imagination wound around its creeping grooves, they in turn winding around the senses as Carlson shares the song’s hellacious contents. In contrast, its brief successor is a warmer if sinister wash of mellow sound and intensity but a match in igniting the imagination and pushing it to explore its own interpretative adventure.

Bringing the album to a close is Murderfreak Blues, a song which crushes the senses yet within a breath or two becomes a stalking, seducing, and ravishing provocation of their weaknesses as, unsurprisingly, psyche twisting grooves and demanding rhythms leave, through murderous traits, their own lingering and welcome marks.

It is a mighty end to an album which grows with every listen, managing to seem even more antagonistic each time as it impresses in sound and craft. And Then There Were None is a blood encrusted groove fest and very easy to recommend.

And Then There Were None is out now via Rise Above Records @ http://www.riseaboverecords.com/shop/

http://www.churchofmisery.net/   https://www.facebook.com/churchofmiserydoom/

Pete RingMaster 07/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/