Big Boy Bloater and The Limits – Luxury Hobo

BBB_RingMaster Review

Fancy a rich dose of spice to your rock ‘n’ roll then the new album from Big Boy Bloater & The Limits is a must. Luxury Hobo offers nine rich blues tinged slices of contagious rock ’n’ roll which relentlessly infests body and emotions like a sonic viral complaint to which no cure is available or wanted.

Guitarist, singer, songwriter, and radio presenter, Big Boy Bloater is an artist to which hungry ears and acclaim seem to flock to. His career and unique style in songwriting, playing, and sound has seen him the feast of the blues and roots scenes, playing numerous major festivals across the US and Europe, and tour across Europe, the Middle-East, the USA, and Canada. Equally he has played behind and with the likes of Imelda May, Paloma Faith, and Wanda Jackson and been invited by Sir Paul McCartney to record with him at Abbey Road. He is a wanted man and easy to see why from Luxury Hobo alone.

Forming latest band Big Boy Bloater & The Limits in 2011, Big Boy Bloater defies the description of being a bluesman as predominantly tagged by a great many. As proven by Luxury Hobo, he creates fusions of flavours which no-one else seems to have the notion of casting. For the new album R&B is at times entangled with swamp and delta blues, seventies rock ‘n’ roll merged with old school rockabilly and fifties garage rock, and…

Reality is that the fusions are rich and plenty resulting in songs which play like old friends yet are like few other companions you may have come across, certainly outside of the man’s own creative psyche. Luxury Hobo is Big Boy Bloater’s darkest collection of songs too; its themes bred from a bout of depression in 2013. Talking of the time and release, Big Boy Bloater openly said “I had a breakdown, the album centres around that we’ve got all these great things but are still pissed off and medicate ourselves to be normal,” further adding that “The basic idea of the title is we are all luxury hobos these days, we get to go here, there and everywhere but no one has it the hard way now do they? We all have our luxuries, it’s that juxtaposition; I think the whole album is about the modern day life and society.

artwork_RingMaster ReviewAs evidenced in the album’s opener alone it does not mean there is an absence of the flirtatious hooks and unpredictable twists, as well as the energy driven virulence fans have become so enamoured by in his music. Devils Not Angels is an irresistible start to the adventure; a flirtatious romp from its first guitar flame quickly breaking into a feisty swagger with a seriously catchy attitude and incitement of sound. From the smiling keys of Dan Edwards to the rousing rhythms of bassist Steven Oats and drummer Matt Cowley, the song has body and soul pumped with raw pleasure taken further care of by the gravelly voice and fiery guitar craft of Big Boy Bloater.

It is a superb start which still gets eclipsed straight away by the following and quite brilliant It Came Out Of The Swamp. It too bounces along with a contagious air to get swiftly involved with but its climate and textures are far more dark, sinister, and invasive. The bass borders on a carnal predation whilst the grooves are dirt encrusted flirtation as swamp blues get tainted with psych rock mischief and rockabilly devilry. Sea Sick Steve meets Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers is the best clue we have to describe the glorious infestation of the senses and imagination on offer, with hooks and melodies courtesy of a warped mix of B52’s and The Dirt Daubers.

I Love You (But I Can’t Stand Your Friends) rolls in with its pop ‘n’ rock charms next, tasty melodies cupping ears as vocals offer an opening romance with a sting in the tail. Both traits continue to entice and arouse ears as well as passions as the song strolls along with a grin on its face and rock flirtation in its heart. As its predecessors, the listener’s physical involvement is a quick success and equally drawn by the blues twang soaked seduction of The Devil’s Tail. Hips are soon swaying to its swerving body of grooves and alluring harmonies, ears there before them in submission to its sultry tempting before I Got The Feeling Someone’s Watching Me has the imagination engulfed in dark rock ‘n’ roll intrigue and salacious seduction. The outstanding song crawls over the senses, smooching with ears as the grainy tone of Big Boy Bloater’s vocals lays the seeds to dark deeds from unrelenting prying eyes whether in the noir lit streets of shadow thick towns, the bright romance of Parisian walkways, or more intimate surroundings.

From one immense highlight to another as the sexy swing of Luxury Hobo Blues takes centre stage with one wonderful nag of a tasty hook through a net of catchy rock ‘n’ roll. Potent harmonies and a web of sultry grooves only add to the riveting trap of a song before Robot Girlfriend offers futuristic love in a magnetic rockabilly/garage/blues rock shuffle. As all songs before it, even the dark crawls of It Came Out Of The Swamp and I Got The Feeling Someone’s Watching Me, it has a swing and vibrant energy which has the body tapping or indeed rocking in full allegiance, something All Things Considered decides to go against, though it too only see a sway take the body. Its soulful croon is wrapped in the smoulder of keys, that alone a simmering heat of temptation enhanced by the emotive cry of Big Boy Bloater and the spirals of melancholic yet invigorating guitar.

The album returns to tearing up the dance-floor with closer Not Cool Man, rhythms and riffs colluding to lay a canvas of energetic incitement whilst the bass flirts and grooves flare up above it. Rock ‘n’ roll to get close and personal with, the track perfectly concludes an album which has ears blissful and the body exhausted. Luxury Hobo is pure manna for the soul and if a better example of diversity loaded rock ‘n’ roll arrives this year, it will go down in history as a major classic, much as we suspect this treat from Big Boy Bloater & The Limits.

Luxury Hobo is released 11th March via Provogue/ Mascot Label Group through most online stores and @ http://www.mascotlabelgroup.com/big-boy-bloater-luxury-hobo-cd.html

http://www.bigboybloater.com   http://www.facebook.com/thebigboybloaterpage

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Supersonic Blues Machine – West of Flushing South of Frisco

Photo By Alex Solca

Photo By Alex Solca

Not so much a super group but a collective of irresistible talent, Supersonic Blues Machine release their debut album, West of Flushing South of Frisco, this February and a collection of blues fuelled tracks which leave ears glowing with satisfaction. Centred around the trio of bassist/producer Fabrizio Grossi, guitarist/singer Lance Lopez, and drummer Kenny Aronoff, band and release provide a tapestry of craft and heart fuelled enterprise which, even if blues is not the prime source of your musical tastes, simply stirs up an eager appetite with its tenacious rock ‘n’ roll.

The beginnings of the band began in 2012 with Lopez, when planning a visit to Los Angeles to record a new album, arranging to hook up with Grossi, who has worked with some of the finest musicians from Steve Vai to Tina Arena, Nina Hagen to Alice Cooper as well as Glenn Hughes, Dave Navarro, George Clinton, Joe Bonamassa, Leslie West, Zakk Wylde, Ice T, Slash, and Paul Stanley to name a few. Their plan to knock around new ideas led to a trio of tracks which became the foundation of an exciting new project to which ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons added fuel to the creative fire by suggesting the pair, who he both knew, “should seriously consider working on something together.” Aronoff who has worked with the likes of John Mellencamp, Smashing Pumpkins, Meat Loaf, Brandon Flowers, John Fogerty, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Joe Cocker, was then subsequently recruited, thanks to Toto’s Steve Lukather, to complete the heart of the new adventure.

Rushing forward to now and it is fair to say that West of Flushing South of Frisco is already making a stir from the glimpses of tracks offered as teasers and from the band of musical brothers brought in to give each song its individual and impressive character of sound and persuasion. It opens up with Miracle Man and a coaxing caress of acoustic guitar aligned to enticing sonic tendrils around sand textured vocals. Those sultry strands of blues guitar continue to wind around the moodier tones of bass and the great grain textured vocals of Lopez, even as an infectious saunter breaks free from the more reserved start to lead feet and hips into an eager southern spiced jaunt around the dance-floor.

artwork_RingMaster ReviewIt is a great start more than backed by I Ain’t Fallin’ Again with its punchy rhythms and climactic air of wiry grooves and spicy enterprise. As the first, it too develops an infectious canter which easily coaxes involvement in its anthemic funk lined revelry and continues the album’s rousing star before Running Whiskey turns up the heat again with its rock ‘n’ roll blaze. Featuring Billy F. Gibbons, the song aligns shimmering keys with classic rock ‘n’ roll with a very gentle scent of Thin Lizzy to it.

Remedy mellows the adrenaline running through veins next, though the song with Warren Haynes (Gov’t Mule/Allman Bros Band) adding his provocative craft has ears and enjoyment firmly gripped with its smouldering Americana. Fair to say though, it is quickly replaced in the attention of personal tastes by the outstanding Bone Bucket Blues. Gnarly and cantankerous in riffs alone, the track is a liquor scented stomp with the vocals of Lopez as much galvanic bait as the feverish grooves and tenaciously writhing textures around them. It is led by a brooding bassline which reoccurs in a less imposing manner within the emotive croon of Let It Be. Even within is sweltering climate of emotional intensity, the song has a sway and infectious manner that makes easy pickings of ears.

Equally as fiery and expressive in word and sonic invention is next up That’s My Way with Chris Duarte joining the trio for its catchy rock ‘n’ blues persuasion whilst Ain’t No Love (In The Heart Of The City) is a tantalising engaging cover of the Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland classic. Smoky in air, galvanic in a group loaded chorus, it is easy to suspect that the song has an emotional involvement with one or more of the trio such its impassioned rendering, though that kind of potency is fuel to the album as a whole and in evidence within the Eric Gales enhanced Nightmares And Dreams. Inspired by a dream, the song is a haunting yet inviting roar of voice and emotion draped in the guitar imagination which veins the whole of the album in an array of stirring tapestries.

Walter Trout brings his distinct touch to the lingering temptation of Can’t Take It No More where the pairing of Lopez and Trout‘s vocals alone are worth the price if the ticket whilst after Whiskey Time, a spicy track described as the extended ending to earlier proposal Running Whiskey, the mellow charm of Let’s Call It A Day sees Robben Ford helping create a piano led, guitar shaped serenade which provocatively smooches with ears with a gentle and at times more intensive touch.

Closing with the funky throes of Watchagonnado, the Supersonic Blues Machine debut keeps pleasure full and a hope for more of its band of brothers like rock ‘n’ roll to come. It is fair to say that we are no blues experts but we know what we like and West of Flushing South of Frisco easily fits the bill.

West of Flushing South of Frisco is released February 26th via Provogue/Mascot Label Group @ http://www.mascotlabelgroup.com/supersonic-blues-machine-west-of-flushing-cd.html

http://supersonicblues.com/   https://www.facebook.com/SupersonicBluesMachine

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Minerals – Ball Of String

art_RingMaster Review

As crystalline as the band’s name might suggest, The Minerals’ sound is a kaleidoscope of warm and organic textures woven into a hazy seduction of melodic drama. It may only be two songs, but their new single Ball Of String is fascinating evidence of the fact, and further proof that the magnetically emerging Welsh band is one exciting prospect.

Based in the South Wales Valleys and formed in 2014, The Minerals is the creative union of Colenso Jones and Jodie Gibson. Drawing on inspirations found in the a range of artists from The Vaselines and Leadbelly to Mogwai and Nick Drake, the duo quickly bred their own tantalising sound from a blend simplified as folk and country rock meets electronic and psychedelic exploration. Past experiences have seen the pair being involved in punk bands throughout their teens and early twenties which too in DIY attitude alone simply adds to the invention of The Minerals.

The winter of 2014 saw a collection of songs written by the band in the remote hills of Southern France, songs which were to become their self-titled debut album which was released last June through Staylittle Music. Ball Of String and its companion on the single, Lo-Fi are taken from the eight track full-length and as potent a lure into that full body of songs as you could wish for.

Ball Of String takes little time to grab attention as guitar strums and bass seduction collude to lure ears into the impending embrace of vocal repetition. Lyrically the song is a rotation of a couple of lines, but such their delivery and simple but pungent make-up, the listener is drawn into full involvement. Around them the initially calm but lively climate of sound becomes not exactly volatile but more robustly shadow filled as if building to a major outbreak of intensity. It never goes that far but the drama created is as irresistible as the sounds woven into its insatiable virulence.

The track is glorious, a galvanic whipping up of the passions masterfully backed by Lo-Fi. Once again, a guitar caresses ears initially as a flirtatious bassline mixes with firmer beats. This time around Gibson takes the vocal lead, though both songs are a splendid union of hers and Jones’ potent tones. Musically a stronger psychedelic air lines each suggestive melody from guitar and keys as well as coats the floating harmonies which entice with siren-esque beauty.

Like a mix of Jingo and Jess & The Ancient Ones in many ways, especially the second, both songs leave ears in rapture and a need to hear more as ripe as the enterprise inspiring that greed.

Ball Of String is released February 26th via Staylittle Music @ http://themineralsband.bandcamp.com/album/ball-of-string

Upcoming Live Dates:

April 15th – The Moon Club, Cardiff (supporting Rusty Shackle)

April 16th – Snails Deli, Rhiwbina, Cardiff

https://www.facebook.com/themineralsband   https://twitter.com/themineralsband

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Blood and Crom: talking Conan with Jon Davis

conan2

January saw the unleashing of the new Conan album Revengeance, a leviathan in barbarous weight and corrosive intensity which outshone its equally punishing and exhilarating predecessor of 2014, Blood Eagle. Let off the leash via Napalm Records, Revengeance is a callous incitement making a big statement in the landscape of modern doom metal. Given the opportunity to get into the heart of the album, we probed guitarist Jon Davis to find out about its creation, the background of the band, the state of doom metal right now and more…

Hi Jon and many thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Before we dive into new album Revengeance, can you give us some background to the beginnings of Conan back in 2006?

We started as a two piece, fucked around for a while and then decided to make ourselves into a 3 piece.

Is the band still driven by the same intent and inspirations as when it started out or have they shifted over the past decade?

Yes of course. We’re just a band who likes to play as many shows as possible and get out on the road. We may play bigger stages but we still think the same way we did back when we started touring.

You have just released third album Revengeance, a beast of an infestation and rousing of the senses. Where do you see the band sound wise in comparison to debut full-length Monnos of four years ago and where has your music evolved most potently for you over releases?

I think our sound is still pretty much the same, a three piece of drums guitar and bass, but the songs themselves have become slightly more intricate; more interesting and heavier. We use dynamics to greater effect, and are able to do a little more than the simple ‘slow and low’ that we used to do. Over each release a band should get better at what they do and I think we are achieving that.

Obviously your songs often have seeds in the tales of the band’s namesake but otherwise do the same themes inspire your music now as back then or has that expanded as experiences have?

Our themes are pretty much the same; we don’t want to change our vibe at all as we move forward. Our songs might become more musically diverse but our themes will always be pretty much the same

636_Conan_RGB_RingMaster ReviewDid you go into the writing of Revengeance with any specific direction or premeditated exploration in mind?

Not really no, we wanted to write a better album than Blood Eagle and Monnos but aside from that we didn’t try and steer ourselves in any particular direction. We just got in the practice room and wrote songs as they came along, really naturally; it was cool.

As shown by the new album alone, there is a depth of diversity to your brutal doom propositions working away as potently as the carnivorous surface confrontation. Is there a fine balance you have to find to create that compelling union of callous intensity and groove infested rabidity?

I think we have always had a certain groove to our music. We have always mixed that with pretty simple brutal riffs and drums that carry the riff along in a slightly more ‘groovy’ (not 60’s) way.

Did you approach the actual recording of Revengeance the same way as its acclaimed predecessor Blood Eagle of 2014?

Yeah, exactly the same…Chris Fielding (now on bass / vocals) produced it at our studio (Skyhammer Studio) and we had a great time. This was the same set up as Blood Eagle, but of course Chris and Rich had joined in place of Phil and Paul.

Was it a release which continued to grow and develop at the recording stage or are you a band which likes to go into the studio with songs finished and ready to go?

We always get to the recording phase with the songs ‘almost’ ready. This was no different. There will always be a degree of change during the recording process and we kind of like that as we can go with the flow and maybe improvise a little bit during the writing process

There is a raw energy and that uncharitable intensity which feels like being physically there in the face of the Conan storm and assault; was the album set down with live takes and how does the writing process work within Conan?

The writing process usually consists of me working out some riffs and showing the guys. We will then all get together in the practice room and work through the song ideas and riffs and create the songs. The album was recorded the same way as usual really. Drums were done live with me playing a guide guitar track. Then guitars were recorded over the drum takes and the same with bass and then vocals at the end.

Do you test new songs out on the road first before committing them to record?

On this album we played Thunderhoof live a few times and that felt good, but the other tracks didn’t get played live before the recording.

When you played it, how did you gauge reactions? Obviously fans are more than likely to react positively to anything offered live so where do you look for key signs if something new is working?conan1_RingMaster Review

With Thunderhoof people seemed to like it but we noticed they really liked the songs like Horns for Teeth and Foehammer off Blood Eagle; I guess our writing style went in that direction once or twice on Revengeance.

There seems to be a new rich wave of emerging bands within the doom landscape, how are you seeing it from the inside as one of those increasingly driving the scene for the past decade?

Most of them aren’t ‘doom’…… You will see heavy bands, but why can’t they just call themselves ‘heavy metal’? We adopted up our own ‘Caveman Battle Doom’ thing as a joke after our first ever show called us that, but we don’t take that seriously. There are lots of great HEAVY bands out there though, but they aren’t necessarily doom…

The UK and European doom landscape is at its strongest to date though would you say?

I guess so. Those bands that are actually playing music that resembles doom do it very well – Serpent Venom, Coltsblood etc. There are lots of cool bands currently; it’s a good time to be alive.

What is next for Conan as 2016 develops? You have some live dates I believe coming up?

Yeah, we are touring the US in March and then the rest of 2016 we have lots of live shows and festivals. We love to tour.

Once more, our big thanks Jon for sharing your time with us. Any last thoughts you would like to add?

Cheers, thanks for reading.

And finally, give us an insight into the records and artists which could be claimed to have most inspired your own creative life.

Slomatics’ Flooding The Weir and everything that followed it.

http://www.hailconan.com/    https://www.facebook.com/conandoom/

Read our review of Revengeance @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/conan-revengeance/

RingMaster Review

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Karel Fialka – Peace v War (featuring Racecar)

Photo by Mike Ross

Photo by Mike Ross

A name from the past returning to stir up ears again with a new album is Karel Fialka, a man who became a potent part of electro pop in the eighties. In reality, Fialka has never truly been away, continuing to write and record with other bands and artists as well as being a well-respected and sought after artist on the production side of things. Mention his name though and certainly our thoughts, as a great many it seems, refer to eighties tracks such as The Eyes Have It and Hey Matthew as our last major memories. That is set to change though with the release of Peace v War, a set of songs created in collaboration with Racecar which simply and increasingly captivate.

Emerging around 1978, Fialka first drew attention with 7” single Armband, a song destined to become a cult classic. The Eyes Have It saw strong radio attention and further acclaim a year later, with the album it came from, Still Life an equally well-received offering spawning further eagerly received singles. Continuing to be an active songwriter with many of his tracks covered by numerous artists, it was not until 1987 with the release of the single Hey Matthew on Miles Copeland’s I.R.S. Records that Fialka hit the charts for his biggest success. Second album Human Animal grabbed attention the following year though fans had to wait almost a decade for its 2009 successor, Film Noir. It has been though, a host of years in regard to Fialka which has slipped us, again as others, personally by, which is why the pleasant surprise when being sent over the promo for Peace v War.

art_RingMaster ReviewWritten and recorded with the Racecar, which is Kevin McGowan and Richard Rogers, Peace v War is set to be a release casting Fialka back into the ears and radar of that great many. It is a lyrically sharp and emotionally irritable collection of songs looking at themes which are impacting on the modern world such as war, hunger, inequality, political chicanery and media manipulation. Musically though, it is a flavoursome maze of tracks which are as catchy and bright as their narratives are biting and dark.

Released only digitally and on 12″ vinyl which comes wrapped in a cover designed by Grammy Design Award nominee Mike Ross, you will excuse us if we look at Peace v War in the track order of the promo sent to us rather than what seems to be the different placing of songs on certainly the vinyl version, though both start with the excellent Political Animal. It is a song which saunters in with a mellow air and a smiling melodic coaxing though more inflamed grooves soon add to the still restrained but simultaneously catchy and sombre encounter. Led by the dark accusing tones of Fialka, there is a Fad Gadget air and texturing to the guitar shaped song which only adds to its urgent appeal, that and the easy to join chorus with its crowd of female led vocal infectiousness.

Variety is a soon show as another open hue to the album, Scratch The Surface for example nudging up to ears and appetite with its reggae seeded riffs and swagger which brings a scent not too removed from The Clash, even as keys lay their evocative ambience around the magnetic lure of rhythms and guitar which shows a great line in discord at times. That diversity continues as the likes of White Gold In The Aral Sea, with its even darker tone laced with Ruts spiced predation and emotive piano expression, and the exotically woven Synthetic Sin share their unique characters and fascinating landscapes. The first of the two is soaked in a brooding that infests the imagination but is swiftly eclipsed by the second and best track on the album. With a potent blend of vocals from the band and mystique hued melodies which hauntingly wind around the addictive sway and virulence of the song, it simply has ears and appetite eating out of its creative hands.

A bluesy air colludes with electronic resourcefulness in Calvary, a song which from a strong start just seems to blossom in weight and colour with each of its alluring four plus minutes whilst Listen To The World explores a vocal and melodic intimacy which nicely contrasts the broader themes and bodies of the songs around it, though its seeds lead to its own expansive look at the world. Vibrant rhythms make a smart temper to the slower tonal exploration of the track, but uniting to be part of another deceptively catchy encounter. That infectious energy is keen a part and parcel of most of Peace v War as shown again by the pop funk saunter of What Are You Gonna Do?, where a whisper of Heaven 17 emerges in its livelier chorus to again contrast and blend with a more solemn breath.

Our version of the album closes with two evocative instrumentals in the piano bred I Rode That Tide With The Starry-Eyed and the melodic dissonance of Obsession which in the vinyl’s line-up of songs provides a potent interlude mid-way.

Whichever order of the songs, there is no lack of thorough enjoyment found within Peace v War, all three musicians and songwriters creating songs which stimulate and pleasure the senses in equal measure. It is not quite right to say that Karel Fialka is back, he has never really been away, but certainly he with Racecar is set to be the focus of good attention again.

Peace v War is released digitally and on 12” vinyl via PVW Records on February 26th through most stores or directly through Cadiz Music Ltd @ http://www.cadizmusic.com/2007/index.php?location=/web/Search/karel%20fialka

https://www.facebook.com/fialkakarel   http://karelfialka.com/

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2016

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Pinkshinyultrablast – Grandfeathered

Pinkshinyultrablast_RingMaster Review

Like the mesmeric shimmer of sun on crystal clear waters, the new album from Russian quintet Pinkshinyultrablast seduces and as if sinking further in that mesmeric state, Grandfeathered steers the imagination into a dream world of bold and unpredictable drama. Not much more than a year ago the Saint-Petersburg hailing band impressed and drew rich acclaim for their debut album Everything Else Matters, but now they have left it in the shadows with the richer invention and imagination of Grandfeathered, a second full-length taking the listener off on a collection of irresistible adventures.

The shoegaze beauty of its predecessor has not been abandoned in Grandfeathered but fair to say it is a bigger and bolder experimentation of sound and flowing ambiences wrapped in celestial born harmonies. That exploration is immediately in evidence within opener Initial. Its first breath is a singular electronic lure, a nagging siren-esque note which is soon joined by aural silver and sonic mercury. There is no escaping the metallic feel of the impending proposal and indeed its harsher dark depths as a scuzzy wind blows across the unpredictable coaxing on the senses. Subsequently though, the song dives into the warm waters of melodies as the bewitching vocals of Lyubov seduces song and ears alongside within the captivating landscape of Rustam’s keys.

It is easy to offer up bands such as Lush and Cocteau Twins as reference to the Pinkshinyultrablast invention but this time around they are mere spices in a recipe distinct to the five-piece as shown by Glow Vastly. Erupting in a scuzz ball of guitar from Roman loaded with fiercely enticing hooks, the song quickly shows a darker intent and range of imposing shadows. Equally though, it entices with a Japan like venture as an exotic climate envelopes ears amidst engagingly invasive electronics with Lyubov’s voice a beacon of radiance and the bass of Igor a provocative temper backed by the roaming beats of Sergey. As the first, and those to come, the song provides a suggestive travelogue of sound which sparks the imagination to roam its own adventure.

Through the rhythmically snappy and melodically bubbly I Catch You Napping and the excited shuffle of Kiddy Pool Dreams, the band sculpts another pair of infection soaked escapades. The first is a collusion of contrasts, heavy rapacious surges entangling with a pop toned catchiness and virulent swagger whilst its successor skips with melodic innocence across the heavier trespasses of raw textures. As ears eventually find themselves drawn into a kaleidoscopic realm of sparkling electronics and unconventional sonic scenery, the ever tantalising and seductive vocals make mesmeric company as a free fall through the song’s soundscape turns into a finale of rousing guitar rock.

The boisterously energetic and contagious Comet Marbles is a radiant shower of temptation and poetic enterprise next complete with a bass led funk seeded undercurrent whilst The Cherry Pit offers its own inescapable web of catchiness through rolling rhythms and flirtatious harmonics. Both tempt and tease in their individual ways with keys and guitars as compelling as Lyubov’s caresses and the blend of contrasting yet perfectly united textures anthemically inviting and often commandingly bracing.

The album is concluded by firstly the invigoratingly punkish exploits of the alternative rock meets fiery shoegaze that is Mölkky and finally the hip involving dance of the album’s title track. Every song has a surging energy and a liveliness which grips body and soul, it as much the by-product of the rich blends woven into their new musical exploration as a determined intent, but Grandfeathered is the one song which leaves exhaustion as rife as rich pleasure.

Pop, shoegaze, alternative pop, however you wish to describe Grandfeathered, the album is one highly stimulating and seriously enjoyable adventure. Its predecessor certainly pleased, but Pinkshinyultrablast has bred, nurtured, and unleashed a beast of unshakable temptation this time around which is sure to poke the keenest global spotlights.

Grandfeathered is released digitally and on CD February 26th via Club AC30 through most online stores with ltd edition “Ride The Sky”, “Pinkle”, and “Acid Lollypop” flavoured vinyl where still available.

https://www.facebook.com/Pinkshiny

Pete RingMaster 24/02/2016

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