Love Buzzard – Antifistamines

LB_RingMaster Review

A riotous stomp embracing rock ‘n’ roll over the decades within its psyche punk /garage rock bred escapades, the debut album from UK duo Love Buzzard is lo-fi, high grade devilry to get lustfully involved with. Antifistamines sizzles on the senses, creating a mischievous and increasingly incendiary introduction to the pair of vocalist/guitarist Kevin Lennon and drummer Al Brown (the man behind Fluffer Records). Love Buzzard has a sound living up to its name too, music which insatiably seduces whilst stalking and preying on the carcass of the senses.

From around the release of first 7”double A-sided single Everything About You / Caught in The Deed in 2013, Love Buzzard has played over 150 gigs around the UK single, sharing stages with the likes of Cerebral Ballzy, Slaves, and God Damn along the way. The end of 2014 saw the release of a five-track self-titled EP on Brown’s Fluffer Records, a fiery encounter raising potent anticipation for the band’s first full-length. Released last year digitally and on CD, Antifistamines recently had its rousing body unveiled on special edition vinyl via legendary punk label 1-2-3-4 Records, the home of The Buzzcocks, Arrows Of Love, and Bad For Lazarus. Quite simply it is a raw and ravenous slab of rock ‘n’ roll with a broad brush of variety that is sure to fire up the energies of punks, rockers, bluesmen, and post-punksters alike.

The album starts with a bang courtesy of Cash; the pounding beats of Brown descending on ears from the first second as the spicy grooves of Lennon fizz and fiercely shimmer on the senses soon after. Hooks are as vibrant as the overall swing of the song too, its garage rock tenacity like a mix of Eighties Matchbox B-line Disaster and US duo In The Whale and as tasty as that mix suggests. An all-out assault unafraid to relax into momentary blues seeded seducing, the stunning opener leaves exhaustion and rich pleasure in its wake before the even more muscular Headrush snarls and barges into view. It too has the instinctive virulence of pure rock ‘n’ roll aligned to a just as contagious metallic intensity, not forgetting Cramps-esque mayhem.

art_RingMaster ReviewThrough the stoner laced fire of Beams and the dark seduction of Creep And Crawl, band and album has the body increasingly bouncing. The first is an agitated ball of steamy grooves whilst its successor dips into its passion for the blues to uncage another ravenous haze of tangy rock rabidity, though its own boisterous exuberance is eclipsed by that of the psychobilly/garage punk infestation of the psyche that is Passion. As the opening track it breaches a plateau that all tracks seriously worry, staking its claim as one of the major pinnacles of Antifistamines. Its success is matched by the equally psychotic and irresistible Superglue where Lennon and Brown create a jungle of temptation with their searing grooves and anthemic beats respectively; the former subsequently unleashing his ever magnetic vocal energy and persuasion to seal the deal between sound and ears.

Recently released as a video to tease attention and ears into the album, Wild blazes away next. It is a muggy and inflamed embrace of garage rock, a captivation which singes the senses whilst stirring up the imagination with gentle melodies and emotive lures within an otherwise ferocious climate. For personal tastes, the song does not make the same impact as the tracks around it but certainly keeps an eager appetite fulfilled before the schizo shuffle of Give It Some Range and the surf rock romancing of Heaven’s Got An Electric Fence again has body and passion leaping around without inhibition. The two alone are glorious examples of the diversity and creative adventure in the album, a bold resourcefulness which never breaks the kindred spirit flowing through the album.

Origins is another slow burner compared to others for these ears but easy to devour with its toxic grooving whilst the album’s title track badgers and nags like a middleweight boxer, Brown taking jabs as Lennon’s guitar and vocals flirt and dance around. The latter of the pair especially rouses the spirit with its Fat Dukes Of Fuck meets Hasil Adkins like revelry and is quickly emulated in feverish kind by Lines and its catchy merger of blues and fifties rock ‘n’ roll before Tower entwines some southern goodness into its adrenaline fuelled punk ‘n’ roll stomping. The track is a mouth-watering end to the album though the vinyl version has another five slices of rousing goodness.

The first is the cavernously raw Oh and garage punk at its most deviously addictive. Its inescapable slavery is followed by the wiry charms and thick belligerence of the outstanding Caught In The Deed and in turn the psychobilly sultriness of Rule This Town. These three alone are worth the purchase of the vinyl version, even if already owning one of the other options, but add a deranged and masterful cover of the Gang Of Four track Guns Before Butter and it is a no brainer. The duo takes a classic and turns it into another, retaining the cold air and rhythmic hypnotism of the original whilst igniting a tempest of energy and psychosis to bask in. Make You Mine is the final bonus song, a twenty second sing-a-long which simply leaves ears and mood on a high.

In a time of impressive rock duos, Love Buzzard installs themselves as one of the most exciting and addictive through Antifistamines. Rock ‘n’ roll is meant to be raw, impassioned, and bred to lead all into bad habits. Their album has all that and plenty more, and believe us when we say Love Buzzard has only just started.

Antifistamines is out now digitally and on Cd @ https://lovebuzzard.bandcamp.com/ and on fluorescent green vinyl via 1-2-3-4 Records @ http://www.1234records.com/#!blank/ez8yd/e3b62f39-bef9-c7ac-6707-f65fd40866a2

http://www.lovebuzzard.com/   https://www.facebook.com/LoveBuzzard   https://twitter.com/Love_Buzzard

Pete RingMaster 23/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Scrap Dealers – After A Thousand Blows

TSD_RingMaster Review

After A Thousand Blows is the absorbing debut album from Belgian band The Scrap Dealers, a quintet unafraid to merge distinctive sounds into one immersive experience. As shown by their latest release, it is an imaginative collation of flavours which maybe not be always forcibly unique quite yet but certainly offers a fresh and fascinating captivation for ears and imagination.

Formed in 2012 in Liège, The Scrap Dealers initially emerged with a garage punk sound, releasing their attention grabbing debut EP Red Like Blood two years later. At that point though, the band began embracing a more psychedelic rock driven direction in sound; kraut and shoegaze influences amongst many similarly woven into their new explorations. Towards the end of 2014, a second offering in the shape of a self-titled EP was unveiled, the impressive release making a potent bridge between the band’s old and new blends of sound. After A Thousand Blows is another resourceful step in the evolution, but an encounter at times still enjoyably showing the rawer rock ‘n’ roll instincts the quintet of Hugues Daro, Régis Germain, Justin Mathieu, Cédric Georges, and Bruno Lecocq began with.

Recorded, mixed, and mastered by Allan Snon and Jeremy Alonzi, and released on Belgian DIY record label JauneOrange, After A Thousand Blows opens up with the instantly atmospheric Walking Alone. From its first portentous rumblings, keys and guitars entwine in a sonic mist sharing dark shadows and melancholic ambience. As bold beats enter the affair, a lighter hue begins to blossom; the catchiness of rhythms the eventual spark to warm melodies and a sultry glaze around the darker essences which remain as potent as ever. The vocals equally have a harmonic glow to them, thoughts of My Bloody Valentine and Curve emerging as the song continues to shimmer yet there is a strain of alternative and psych rock which only adds more character to the gripping start to the album.

The following I’ll Never Be Like You also emerges with a singular coaxing of sound but does not hang around before unveiling its own psych pop adventure with a persistent catchiness which infests everything from voice to guitar, bass to drums, and indeed the listener. As shown by its predecessor and all tracks to come, there is a drama in the songwriting and music of The Scrap Dealers; an intriguing undercurrent which has the imagination as hooked as firmly ears are enthralled by the virulence of sound. Here the magnetic but predacious tone of the bass is a prime instigator; enticing shadowy clouds and emotive dilemmas whilst offering addictive bait of its own backed by flirty beats and the evocative tapestry cast by the guitars.

A scent of the band’s garage rock origins comes with She Doesn’t Wanna Leave Your Mind, the track a slimmer, compared to the thicker immersions of the earlier songs, but no less emotive embrace of ears. Its raw and fuzzy textures easily engage and stir attention though the sinister air and volatile breath of Keep My Silence Safe soon puts it in the shade. There is no escaping an enticing essence of The Jesus and Mary Chain to the excellent encounter, especially as its dark invasive entrance slips into another magnetic stroll lit with psychedelic colouring and pop rock revelry. From the dark there is light, a switch of mood and texture which all the tracks seem to be built upon no matter which contrast they start from, and no more alluring than within this siren of a song.

The surf rock laced melodic rock romancing of That’s What We Call Love takes over to keep ears greedy, its tangy nature and whiff of discordance tantalising as it engagingly seduces. As potent as it is though, the ten minute adventure of I Lost My Faith in no time steals all attention from its companion. The closing track has the psyche rock mesmerism of The Horrors and the melodic enticing of Slowdive woven into its own distinct and seductive landscape of enveloping shadows and immersive beauty. Maybe a tad too long for personal tastes, the song is a riveting close to a thoroughly enthralling release, whilst The Scrap Dealers are a band who, as their sound continues to evolve, is on the path to being a potent part of the psychedelic and shoegaze landscape.

After A Thousand Blows is out now via JauneOrange in conjunction with Sick Fuzz Records, digitally and on vinyl and tape @ https://thescrapdealers.bandcamp.com/

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Pete RingMaster 23/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Mefisto – 2.0.1.6

Mefisto - 2. 0. 1. 6 cover_RingMaster Review

Formed in 1984 under the name Torment, Swedish metallers Mefisto is noted along with Obscurity, as being the first Swedish extreme bands to surge through the opening made by Bathory. It was a band which quickly drew a loyal local following, with the 1986 release of a pair of demos in Megalomania and The Puzzle finding keen reactions in the metal underground, which over time has grown to the band earning cult status. Within a year of their release though, they had succumbed to the pressure of finding no real support and called it a day. Now thirty years on from those early releases, the band unleashes debut album 2.0.1.6, a thrilling and fresh proposal which suggests that Mefisto had maybe been ahead of their time first time around.

In 2014 Mefisto was reformed by band originals, guitarist/vocalist Omar Ahmed and drummer Robban Granath, the pair joined by bassist Morgan Myhrberg last year. Their return was marked by The Megalomania Puzzle, a compilation bringing the early demos together in one rousing invitation released via, as the new album, Vic Records. Mastered by Dan Swano (Opeth, Katatonia, Bloodbath), 2.0.1.6 now gives the metal world something which has been eagerly anticipated for, in many ways decades, the first Mefisto full-length.

A gentle melodic caress brings album and opener Deathrace into view, though it is just a poetic coaxing into a subsequent sinister siren-esque mesh of fiery grooves and jabbing rhythms. That as quickly becomes a tempest of thrash kilned riffs and rapier like beats as vocals crowd ears with growling antagonism. Now in full flight, the track entwines a web of metal styles with craft and invention, the grouchily wiry bass alone captivating bait to get off on.

The strong start is merely an appetiser in many ways, the following Void swiftly a more thunderous and imposing protagonist for ears and appetite. With muscles on full show, the track swings with inescapable virulence; intimidating and enticing with spite and tenacity before throwing a delicious curve ball by slipping into a melody rich passage of progressive and classic metal enterprise. Across its length, the band continues to revolve between extremes of texture and the compelling mix of aggressive and calm invention; individual craft and united imagination blossoming with every thrilling twist and turn.

The barbarous Act Dead has the job of following the first pinnacle of the album, its bracing hostility and sonic endeavour making great success of keeping enlivened ears and emotions on a firm high. Sturdy and confrontational, the track provokes and invites with unruly resourcefulness but controlled ferocity, showing why in its earlier guise in the band’s career, it was a potent incitement.

Heads in the Sand twists and turns in another web of varied metallic provocation next. Thrash and death metal is twisted into the lining of melodic tendrils and searing grooves, they offering a catchiness which itself is aligned to a more progressive exploration. A slower persuasion than the immediacy of earlier tracks, it still blossoms by the minute into another highly pleasing adventure that only lingers in the psyche.

The almost theatrical drama of Frost of Inferno involves ears and thoughts straight after, its raw and brutish canvas the landscape for a kaleidoscope of melodic expression and enterprise shared by the open skills and creative devilry of Ahmed. It is a song which enjoyably has one foot in the past and the now, whilst successor Hate Consumes Me with the same flirtatious drama to its body and narrative, is a cauldron of modern rock ‘n’ roll. Predatory in its calm and incendiary in its sonic boldness whilst being primal in energy, the track fuses death and heavy metal with essences of broader heavy rock, resulting in another major highlight.

A touch of classical guitar stirs The Puzzle into tempestuous life, which in turn breeds a constantly evolving stalking and ravaging of the senses which is very easy to get greedy over. Compelling as it invades and seduces with rousing persistence, it is eclipsed by the album’s closing title track. It too has a predatory air and nature to its melodic tempting and progressively nurtured adventure with the vocals emulating their character as Ahmed’s string craft bewitches.

It is a superb end to a thoroughly enjoyable and increasingly impressive debut album. It seems strange saying that Mefisto has a rich future ahead of them after thirty years or so since their first steps, but 2.0.1.6 suggests this is just the beginning of bigger and bolder things.

2.0.1.6 is out now via Vic Records through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Mefisto-234630006720804

Pete RingMaster 23/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Apherium – Embrace The Fall That Brought Us Here

Apherium_RingMaster Review

Our introduction to British alternative rockers Apherium came last September with the Neoteric EP. It was a striking and attention grabbing offering if one whose major peaks left the surrounding adventure of the release seeming like it was lacking a spark or two. The potential was inescapable though, and now in full flow in new offering Embrace The Fall That Brought Us Here. The new three-track EP from the Somerset quartet blows its predecessor out of the water and though it might contain less songs each shows a band on close terms with increasing craft and tenacious invention.

Its members having met at college, Yeovil hailing Apherium emerged in 2011 and within a year had released a self-titled EP and debut album The Cycle. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of Midgar, Biffy Clyro, InMe, TesseracT, and Anathema, the band continued to evolve and hone their sound in an exploration which provided a stirring tapestry of flavours in last year’s acclaimed Neoteric EP At that point it was announced as the band’s finest moment to date, though as suggested, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Larry Turner, bassist/vocalist Callum Shortland, guitarist/vocalist Ross Derby, and drummer Ashley Jones have burst onto a new plateau of sound, invention, and seemingly passion with Embrace The Fall That Brought Us Here.

Recorded with legendary producer and sound engineer John Mitchell (YouMeAtSix, Lower Than Atlantis, Enter Shikari), the EP opens up with Resolve, a song swiftly enticing ears with jabbing beats and a moody bassline as guitars cast a thick mesh of sonic coaxing. A moment’s relaxation sparks a bold stroll ridden by the impressive vocals of Turner. Thereafter, the song is a forceful and anthemically engaging proposal, enhancing its gripping start with potent backing vocals amidst a rhythmic intensity and melodic flames which rise up with increasing contagion. By mid-way on the first listen, it is impossible not to be fully involved with participation a given by the second and certainly third outing with the excellent encounter.

Embrace The Fall That Brought Us Here (Artwork)_RingMaster ReviewIt is an attribute all three songs have, a familiarity which plays like an old, but previously unknown, friend. They also share the quality to be the lead song, the big invitation to the EP. Embrace has that pleasure and quickly has its infectious claws in ears as stabbing beats and irritable riffs collude with the emotive tones of Turner and the brewing ascent of evocative melodies. Raw vocal expulsions are amongst the unpredictable and inventively infused elements that create even greater hooks within the catchy, bordering on volatile blaze where angst powered roars are seamlessly merged with elegant calms.

Closing track Ever Present bruises and seduces from the off, the scything swings of Jones imposing drama backed by the moody tones of Shortland’s bass whilst the guitar enterprise of Derby and Turner is at times pure creative theatre and persistently an arousal of the imagination. Emotively inflamed and dynamically compelling, the song is a mighty end to the thrilling next step in the rise of Apherium.

With their last EP, comparisons to bands such as Funeral for a Friend were easy to suggest, but as the band has untapped further into the creative depths hinted at previously, Embrace The Fall That Brought Us Here emerges as something solely Apherium; with the promise of more to be discovered bringing extra intrigue in their future.

Embrace The Fall That Brought Us Here is available from February 29th, and able to be pre-ordered @ https://apheriumofficial.bandcamp.com/album/embrace-the-fall-that-brought-us-here

Upcoming Tour dates:

Feb

29th – Leicester, Sumo

Mar

1st – Guildford, The Star Inn

2nd – London, The Garage

3rd – Bristol, Stag & Hounds

4th – Yeovil, Quicksilver Mail

5th – Wigan, The Old Courts

http://www.apherium.com/     https://www.facebook.com/apherium   https://twitter.com/apheriumband

Pete RingMaster 23/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/