91 Allstars – Retour vers la Lumière

91allstars_RingMaster Review

Not convinced by their name but having no problem breeding a healthy appetite for their ferocious sound, 91 Allstars quickly show themselves to be another voraciously rousing proposition within the French metal scene with new album Retour vers la Lumière. The first encounter from the band since a change in line-up, their second album is a thickly enticing assault of death inspired metal aligned to melodic hardcore and plenty of other ripe spices. It roars and brawls with the senses, grips the imagination, and provides plenty to get excited over as 91 Allstars show themselves ready to take on broader spotlights.

Formed in 2005, the Paris quintet has perpetually drawn praise and support with their releases and a live presence which has seen them over the years share stages with the likes of Sick of it all, Gojira, Do Or Die , 25 ta life, Born From Pain, Mass Hysteria, and Knuckledust. Their first year saw the release of a self-titled debut EP and two years later the band teamed up with Danforth for the split release Destroy The Past. Acclaim grabbed debut album Telle Est la Loi in 2010, its success though already being eclipsed by the dynamic and hellacious enterprise of Retour vers la Lumière since its recent release.

91AS_front_RingMaster Review     The atmospheric Intro starts things off, its portentous air full of drama and suggestiveness which is taken on by the tempestuous nature and body of Omniscience. Immediately grooves and hooks are swinging with zeal as raw gruff vocals incite and rhythms batter the senses from the second track. It is a rousing confrontation, one as magnetic as it is hostile with the track’s death metal canvas coated in thrash inspired animosity and hardcore cultured dexterity.

Across both Mon bien, mon mal and Opprimés, band and ears collide as tenacious and antagonistic elements collude to spring a creative animus as appealing as it is threatening. The first of the two songs lines its assault with gripping hooks and spicy grooves as snarling vocals leads its anthemic nature. There is definitely some familiarity to parts of its textures and air but that only adds to the magnetic pull whilst its successor similarly impresses as it stalks the senses with its rumbling bass cored predation and stabbing riffery. As across the album, certain essences remind of bands such as Black Dahlia Murder and Gojira whereas the hardcore spices offer up thoughts of others like Pigs and Every Time I Die, but it all gets woven into something relatively distinctive to and constantly appealing from the French quintet.

Richesse humaine provides a raw bluster of voice and virulent sound next, its body entwined in wiry grooves and viciously anthemic tendencies whilst Les ombres de la perdition stomps along spilling acidic sonic tendrils from its bulging intensity. Epitomising the whole of Retour vers la Lumière, the pair also explore catchy exploits and melodic incitements, each spinning a tapestry of inventive lures which temper yet accentuate the unbridled force of the propositions.

The impressive intent and heart of the album continues through the ravenous animus of Eclipse éternelle and escalates in the primal trespass offered by L’ère du verseau; both songs fierce contagion with plenty to defuse expectations and further ignite a hungry appetite. Their success is matched by that of L’aube des princes, an aurally rancorous intrusion again leaving a want for more by the final note of its masterful and imaginative violation. With the songs sung in French lyrically we floundered but as shown by the encounter there is no mistaking the emotion and heart of each encounter.

Completed by the incessant infiltration of the senses that is Un sombre destin and lastly the album’s rapacious imagination enveloping title track, Retour vers la lumière is a seriously accomplished and enjoyable proposal. Certainly there is a bit of a similarity between tracks at times which defuses some of its immediate potency but songs and the album as a whole only grows to be challenge which impresses again and again.

Retour vers la lumière is out now via Dooweet Records @ http://shop.season-of-mist.com/91-all-stars-retour-vers-la-lumiere-cd-digipack

https://www.facebook.com/91AllStarsOfficiel

http://www.91allstars.com

Pete RingMaster 05/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Endless Recovery – Revel in Demise

ER_RingMaster Review

Just released is the second album from Greek metallers Endless Recovery, a thrash fuelled scavenging of the senses helping to get the new year of metal off to an accomplished and highly satisfying start. Revel in Demise unleashes ten voracious roars seeded in the heavy and thrash metal scene of the eighties but just as keen to involve other extreme spices in their tenacious confrontations.

Formed in 2011, the Athens hailing Endless Recovery soon made their mark on the local underground scene with debut EP Liar Priest the following year. With their first album Thrash Rider uncaged in 2013, the band was already garnering firm interest and support, one fuelled as potently by a live presence which has seen the band over time play with the likes of Deceptor, Enforcer, and numerous Greek underground artists. The follow-up to the well-received Resistant Bangers EP of 2014, the Xmas eve released Revel in Demise makes the band’s thickest forceful nudge on the broadest attention yet.

artwork_RingMaster Review     As ripe with speed metal voracity as thrash hostility, Revel in Demise sets its stall out straight away with opener Sinister Tales, a spicy instrumental of metal diversity magnetically leading the listener into the wilder throes of the album’s title track. The heftily inviting start makes a seamless transition into the more antagonistic and primal nature of its successor, riffs and rhythms an immediate barrage of muscle and attitude driven by the blackened vocal delivery of Michalis Skliros. Group shouts add to the drama already being spun by the sonic dexterity of guitarists Tasos Papadopoulos and Apostolos Papadimitriou, that theatre of temptation courted by the dark primal tone of Panayiotis Alikaniotis’ bass and the uncompromising attack of drummer Michalis Moatsos. It is a quickly gripping beginning to the release, one arguably low on major surprises but rich in full-on incitement.

The following Reaping Fire instantly savages and entices with its torrent of riffs and tangy sonic enterprise whilst Storming Death provides a darker and more hostile environment again coloured with fiery craft and exploits from across the band straight after. Both prove to be just as barbarous as they are welcoming in grooves and hooks, the rhythms and thrash fire in their hearts insatiable provocation driven in top gear. There is plenty of twist and turns to keep predictability at bay too, the first with its spiralling guitar endeavour and varied textures and the second by the vocal scourge of Skliros crawling over the senses as wiry tendrils strikingly vein the tempestuous proposition.

Leather Militia reveals thick eighties inspiration from start to finish but within a muddy tone and air which lifts it into something more intriguing and threatening than it might have been whilst Trapped in a Vicious Circle is a maelstrom of raw fury and adventurous tenacity. At times it is a tapestry of creative clarity and in others smog like intrusiveness on the senses, contrasts working a treat throughout just as Blood Countess does with its torrential invasion of biting rhythms and smothering riffery. It too is a wall of pleasing noise and ferocity veined by searing flames of guitar and captivating grooves, and equally skilled in creating a ravaging as inviting as it is destructive.

A surface familiarity between some tracks is not a major issue when looking deeper into the openly crafted encounters. The excellent Hypnos is a great example, its start and core shape similarly related to its predecessor but quickly given its own character by the cauldron of sonic and melodic enterprise unveiled by the band.

Another lofty highlight comes with Evoke Perdition, the track a hell for leather trespass that bewitches with its nagging grooves and repetitive forcefulness in riff and rhythm, Skliros once again courting the demonic depths with his black metal spiced vocal predation. A definite favourite, the song makes way for the closing assault of Lurking Evil and a dynamically thrilling end to Revel in Demise. The track is a predator, living up to its title with an urgency and creative rabidity which not so much lurks but swarms over the senses to thick success.

The album certainly ends on its biggest high with the last trio of incursions on ears and the soul, but from start to finish Revel in Demise hits the spot perfectly. Uniqueness is maybe not as potent as the instinctive creativity and energy which definitely enriches the encounter, bands such as Kreator and Exodus often reminded, but for an invigorating and thoroughly enjoyable experience Endless Recovery masterfully gets the job done.

Revel in Demise is out now via Witches Brew @ https://endlessrecovery.bandcamp.com/album/revel-in-demise

https://www.facebook.com/endless.recovery

Pete RingMaster 05/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Tibican – Love’s Lost Art EP

cover_RingMaster Review

There is a fire burning at the heart of the Tibican sound, a raw energy and creative intensity which whilst apparent in previous releases has been turned up within the band’s latest EP Love’s Lost Art. Though the new release is our introduction to the London based quartet, hindsighted investigation shows that Tibican has been casting a captivating proposal from their fusion of alternative rock and shoegaze with Brit pop properties for a while but as suggested it has found a new fiery plateau within their latest proposition.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Domenico Scialo, guitarist Peter Saunby, bassist Cathal Wharton, and drummer/vocalist Marc Saunders, Tibican has certainly sparked attention and support with a clutch of EPs, including in 2014, Things Come Apart and It Runs Deep. Their sounds have been played across radio stations in the UK, US, and Europe, a success easy to expect continuing as Love’s Lost Art tempts more and more ears.

The new EP opens with Things We Know and a rhythmic invitation hard to refuse. That firm bait is soon joined by lingering throbs of bass before twin vocals and wandering melodies offer their potent persuasions to the enticement too. Immediately inspirations of bands like My Bloody Valentine and House Of Love make a suggestion in thoughts though they are soon evolving as fierce flames of guitar erupt as the track continues to grow and blossom into a heated slice of reserved but dramatic rock ‘n’ roll. Equally bluesy in tone as Scialo and Saunby show their guitar craft, the track makes for a rich and engaging start.

Slightly mellower in intensity, the following Torch Song similarly engages ears in mere moments as floating harmonies and sonic suggestiveness sparks the imagination as potently as the emerging caustic jangle of guitar sears the air. Like warm yet volatile sonic sunshine unafraid to embrace harsher shadows, the song becomes an increasing seduction which just grows in stature and persuasion with every listen.

Difference Clouds steps up next, quickly revealing a Brit pop/indie rock swagger which hints at the likes of Inspiral Carpets and Birdland as it twists and turns with again fiery temperament and creative volatility within another vocal seducing. As the track proves on its own, Tibican have a sound which inventively merges varied flavours to create maybe something not yet wholly unique but certainly personal to their own imagination.

Closing with the smouldering beauty of Am I Wasting Your Time, arguably the least original song on the EP but without doubt a seriously compelling proposal easy to devour and often, Love’s Lost Art is a lingering temptation which easily lures attention back time and time again. In some ways Tibican are still working towards their own sound and such the enjoyment found in Love’s Lost Art that only suggests good things lay in wait for them and us.

The Love’s Lost Art EP is available now @ https://tibican.bandcamp.com/album/loves-lost-art-ep

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Pete RingMaster 05/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Eyemouth – The Flood

eyemouthep_RingMaster Review

The final day of 2015 saw the release of The Flood, the new EP from Swedish band Eyemouth, and the final instalment of their intent to release a quartet of EPs across last year. As its predecessors, the five track proposition is an electronic adventure for ears and imagination spun in a tapestry as raw as it is melodically seductive and as emotionally magnetic as it is thematically tempestuous. Our introduction to Eyemouth came with their excellent previous encounter Noera Genesis and there is nothing about The Flood to dampen our appetite for their compelling sound and invention.

The origins of the Göteborg hailing Eyemouth begin in 2011 with synth band Estrange and a collection of songs bred from and with a different approach to previous tracks from the Swedish band. Later that year Estrange became Eyemouth as the music continued to evolve, the likes of shaman drumming, vibraphone, tuba, and trombone being added to the expanding exploration within the band’s “more organic and instrumental direction.” It was March 2015 though, when the band’s debut release was unveiled, the Black and Blue Latitudes EP soon sparking keen attention escalated further by its successor Non Compos Mentis in June and the following Noera Genesis last September. As mentioned the final breath of last year gave up The Flood, a fourth creative tempting of light and dark textures which simply grows in ears and emotions with every passing listen.

As its predecessors, The Flood is a fusion of varied rock imagination and post rock ambience upon an electronic landscape, and as those before, a release hard to truly pin down in sound but easy to be enthralled by and lost within as shamanic rhythms alongside haunting melodies and vocals shape a tapestry of contrasting and increasingly alluring textures. It begins with I Am Never and an electronic web of pulses and punchy beats covered in welcoming yet dark lures of brass. Swiftly the quartet of Marcus Lilja, David Lilja, Tove Ekman, and Joakim Åberg has ears stirred and attention drawn, the first tempting of vocals rich enticement within the eighties hued scenery building the expanding landscape of the song. A noir colouring and expression to the encounter equally grows, especially as the quaint yet dramatic suggestiveness of the mellotron spreads across the still minimalistic but increasingly volatile exploration.

The track makes for a gripping start which only blossoms further in ears with each listen, a quality all tracks carry as shown by Pendulum. The second song also makes a low key entrance but is quick with its creative and provocative drama as that ever present tribal underbelly of rhythms and percussion cores a spreading charm of melodic and harmonic warmth aligned to melancholic beauty. Things only get richer and more unpredictable too of course; grainy industrial essences colluding with poetic folkishness and poppy rock bred imagination within the absorbing flight of sound and word.

The mellotron led visual curiousness of brief instrumental Necessitarianism follows before Away serenades the senses and thoughts with its classical keys and organic shanty like shuffle of voice and reflective melodies. An exotic air also pervades the song, a breeze blowing in varying strengths throughout the whole album where santur and accordion amongst other elements colour the unique hearts and characters of tracks and themes.

From one riveting offering to another as To Go brings The Flood to a potent close, its bewitching presence another aural fascination which is part folk song, part sea shanty, and all impressive imagination where finding new nuances and pleasures is a perpetual reward with every listen.

As Noera Genesis there is a cinematic quality to The Flood too and a ghostly air across its creative and evocative exploits which only adds to its rich and increasingly potent lure. Eyemouth are inventive drama and dark beauty for the eyes and one of Europe’s exciting emerging adventures.

The Flood EP is out now via most major online stores.

http://eyemouth.moonfruit.com/   https://www.facebook.com/eyemouthmusic/   https://twitter.com/eyemouthmusic

Pete RingMaster 04/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/