In Isolation – A Certain Fractal Light

In Isolation_RingMaster Review

Amongst the gifts you hopefully receive this Christmas Day, we suggest you drop big hints that one of them should be the new single from UK band In Isolation. Released on the 25th, Parlance is a riveting post punk/new wave inspired anthem for ears and emotions taken from the band’s upcoming debut album A Certain Fractal Light. To kill two birds with one stone, we are going to dive into the full-length right now, a release showing that the single is no flash in the pan in great nostalgia seeded sound and fresh imagination.

Hailing from Nottingham, In Isolation emerged in 2009 openly drawing on inspirations found within eighties post-punk and new wave. Equally though, their sound has seeds in the indie flavours of the following decade and more, with influences on the trio’s invention found in artists ranging from The Smiths, Buzzcocks, and David Bowie to Killing Joke, Editors, and Bloc Party. The years have already seen In Isolation stir strong attention, their well-received singles Film Noir Scandal and Berlin making potent impressions with the latter appearing in the 2013 Steve Best directed movie Zombie Hood alongside the track The Wrong Girl, which In Isolation performed as themselves in the opening club scene of the film. A host of other appearances for their music in movie and TV productions followed whilst live the past years have seen the band share stages with the likes of Republica, Spear Of Destiny, The Chapman Family, and Trailer Trash Traceys amongst a great many and play festivals like Out The Box with Jake Bugg and DV8 alongside Gary Numan.

Parlance cover_RingMaster Review   Having spent fair amount of 2015 writing and creating A Certain Fractal Light, In Isolation is poised to prod even bigger spotlights and appetites with their excellent Gavin Monaghan (Editors, Babes In Toyland, Paolo Nutini) recorded album and before that through Parlance, the second single from and opener to its striking adventure. The song opens with sultry caresses of guitar quickly joined by a great throaty bass tone which quickly reveals an irresistible hook all of its own. Its appearance in turn sparks the guitars to spring new zeal and colour in their enterprise; it all framed by the hypnotic beats and percussion of drummer Tony Ghost. As the vocals of Ryan Swift join the mix, his and John Berry’s guitars still casting a tangy web of temptation, there is a great feel of The Teardrop Explodes to the song but equally a pungent scent of something fresh and solely imaginative to the band with the perpetually snarling bassline the added cream.

The outstanding start makes way for the album’s title track and a similarly potent seducing of ears and appetite. Keys and guitars lay the initial tempting, warm melodies kissing the senses with a China Crisis meets Spandau Ballet like elegance as darker hues bring greater depth to the track through the bass and atmospheric shadows, both skilfully tempering the glow of the song. It is hard not to be swiftly bewitched by the familiar yet unique proposal and further excited by its successors Not Noticing and Truth Or Dare. The first of the two enters on an electronic prowl but with a bold saunter to its gait which is quickly wrapped in a siren-esque harmony. The ever delicious gnarly tone of the bass is there tempting in quick time too, offering its raw bait amongst the just as magnetic hooks of guitar and voice as exotic hues add to the great drama and contagion of the encounter. There is plenty going on to be grabbed by including an electro suggestiveness which perfectly colludes with the dark theatre of guitar and bass in a persuasion lying somewhere between The The and US band Post Adolescence.

From one striking track to another as Truth Or Dare, the first single from the album released a few weeks back, takes over to reveal a body similar to that of the track A Certain Fractal Light but one soon casting its own emotive charm and melodic imagination to swiftly seduce and enlist eager participation from the listener before Elder Statesman engages ears with another imaginative fusion of dark and light soaked textures. As all songs within the album, familiar hues and influences are bold but woven into an evocative proposition creating its own unique character, The Letter straight after, with its rawer tenacious rock ‘n’ roll heart and enveloping virulence, providing another aspect to the potent variety within the post punk inspired melodic tapestry of the album.

Strange Thoughts keeps ears inflamed next with its catchy intent and richly textured romance, female vocals reappearing to add to the resourcefully captivating song. Keys and bass alone make the broadest contrasts as they stand side by side, their union wrapped in the excellent blend of vocals and sonic flames that spring from the pen and invention of In Isolation with compelling ease.

The equally fiery but energetically controlled Ghostburn, its body a close but unique enough design to that of its predecessor, and the classically shaped Gods both keep ears treated, the latter a reflective croon merging gothic overtones and provocative melancholy with poetic melodies. Each again show another facet to the In Isolation sound and invention, before Mist brings the album to a fine close with its own individual heart bred serenade built on a lively canvas of varying and contrasting elements.

Released in March 2016, A Certain Fractal Light is a glorious fusion of old and modern imagination, nostalgia and originality uniting for a highly enjoyable waltz of light and dark adventure. Treat yourself this Christmas with Parlance we say and then really go for it a few weeks later; the single will be a big enough persuasion for deciding on the latter anyway.

Parlance is released December 25th with A Certain Fractal Light out March 2016, both via the band’s own imprint Aye Aye Records.

https://www.facebook.com/inisolationofficial   http://inisolationofficial.tumblr.com   http://twitter.com/InIsolation

Pete RingMaster 16/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Colony House – When I Was Younger

Colony House new pic_RingMaster Review

Recently US indie rockers Colony House released their first UK single in the feisty and captivating shape of Silhouettes to coincide a host of live dates across Europe with Ohio quartet Walk The Moon. Fair to say a healthy buzz was bred and earned by both the shows and the single which was taken from the band’s debut album When I Was Younger; a fuss easy to expect leading to further potent success this side of the pond with the assumed release of the album here too.

Hailing from Nashville, Colony House was formed by Caleb and Will Chapman, the sons of Contemporary Christian pop superstar Steven Curtis Chapman, with Scott Mills who the pair met through a cousin. Initially called Caleb, the band switched to the name of Colony House in 2013, continuing to work on their first album which they began in 2012 and completed that following year. Its songs are a bold and openly intimate look at issues and experiences observed and felt by the band, the accidental death of the brother’s 5-year-old adoptive sister Maria Sue in 2008 one such tragedy. Their songs, as shown by the album, also explore a hope and understanding within the raw elements theming their bodies, their sounds similarly nurtured to accentuate and emphasize their themes with rich success.

artwork_RingMaster Review     The new single opens up the album and swiftly has ears enticed and gripped, Silhouettes swinging in with energetic rhythms and jangly guitar within a warm atmosphere led by the potent vocals. There is an instant familiarity to the sound of the song, nothing specific but recognisable hues welcoming an appetite for vibrant pop rock. It also comes with a thick drama and magnetic virulence, the song bridging melodic intimacy and rousing incitements with a stirring quality that soaks the album throughout as shown by the track’s successor Second Guessing Games. Again hearty and gentle caresses with a catchy intent lead into boisterous exploits with matching infectiousness, their persuasions alternating and entwining across the dynamic swing of the equally impressing track.

Variety is a constant across When I Was Younger too, the sultry and persistently revolving mix of electronic imagination and indie seduction colouring Caught Me By Surprise and the shadowed eighties toned theatre of Roll With the Punches quick evidence. Both of the excellent encounters steal attention with ease, the second especially compelling within its China Crisis meets Editors like weave of emotive melodies and immersive atmospherics around the ever impressing vocals and craft of the band.

There is a touch of UK band The Sea to the Colony House sound, an element hinting throughout but especially coming to mind within the tenaciously resourceful Keep On Keeping On, one of many tracks which just linger in the memory with its gentle but inescapable hooks and a wonderfully unpredictable imagination merging tender elements with fiery textures and emotional intensity. There is also a natural roar to the song and many of its companions which you can easily visualise being a potent force live, the album, we are assured by those in the know, a strong reflection of the band’s rich energy and power on stage.

Through the lively and heartfelt croon of Waiting for My Time to Come and the bluesy tonic of 2:20, band and album continue to enthral and offer spicy variations, the surf rock lined exploits of guitar in the second of the two especially invigorating before Learning How to Love lowers the intensity with its melodic romancing of the senses. It is a potent caressing which still has a rhythmic agitation to keep an eye on, one sparking increasing volatility as the song grows into its smouldering bellow of melodic temptation without breaking its controlling reins.

Through the acoustic serenade of Won’t Give Up and the evolving energy and creative landscape of Moving Forward, satisfaction and enjoyment is full even if neither quite lights the fires as forcibly and long term as earlier tracks or as constantly in the case of the latter. Glorious has a similar success, making a heavily pleasing and increasingly magnetic companion with every listen but not leaving the same seeds to entice an urgent return as say Silhouettes or Caught Me By Surprise.

The album closes out with Lose Control, another skilled theatre of sound and expression weaving in melancholic strings, dramatic rhythms, and the ever bracing mix of melodic and vocal heart. It is an anthemic end to an excellent introduction to the UK of Colony House, and easy to see why they are a healthily devoured proposal back home.

We have no details of the UK release of When I Was Younger but it seems it is on the cards with Silhouettes a more than exciting teaser worth big attention.

The UK and US releases of Silhouettes and When I Was Younger respectively can be found through most online stores.

http://colonyhousemusic.com   https://www.facebook.com/colonyhousemusic

Pete RingMaster 16/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Tuesday Club – Boo Hoo EP

 

_RingMaster ReviewTTC

With the release of the Boo Hoo EP, The Tuesday Club has completed the release of their new album in fine style. The last in the quadrilogy combining to create the band’s 4 x EP Box Set second album, the ‘Heart’ section of the release presents three tracks as ever soaked in the UK band’s unique creative devilry. It is arguably the most diverse of the four EPs and in many ways the most low key yet it easily incites another greedy reaction in an ever keen appetite for the mischievous punk ‘n’ roll devilment of the Walmington-on-Sea hailing ‘concert party’.

With the trio of My Consciousness, Forbidden Kiss, and the freshly released Lady Gargar EPs having already stirred up attention and imagination for the fully body of the album, their releases backed by the band’s ever ravenous live presence around the country, the final piece of the captivating jigsaw gets the job done with its title track alone. Boo Hoo walks in with the recognisable Tuesday Club swagger and bullish mischief that has always fuelled their songs and releases since emerging back in 2011 wrapped in the echoes of the infamous home guard of their town and the in your face zeal of seventies punk. Over time the band’s sound has only evolved, taking on vaudevillian hues to go with its imagination as evidenced potently within that first song on the EP. Guitars and beats make the first temptation, bass a quick second, all leading to the distinct vocal tones of Andreas Vanderbraindrain whose entrance only inspires more revelry in hooks, riffs, and the warm mist of keys. As ever there is a whiff of bands like early Adam and The Ants and Albertos Y Los Paranoias to the romp, though to be honest body and soul are physically and quickly locked in to the swing and antics of the track to spend too much time contemplating comparisons.

BooHooEP4_RingMaster Review    The track is typical Tuesday Club, a glorious enticement to get bold with before Beat Oven takes over. Handclaps line the way for a subsequent sultry guitar which in turn wraps the vocals of Vanderbraindrain and presumably The Minx who sadly left the band recently but we are assuming was in the thick of the recording of the new EP first. With a catchy but subdued sway, the song strolls along sharing its infectious chorus and gait, a tempting again hard to resist getting involved in. There is also an initially undefined familiarity to the lure of the song, especially in its chorus, which is revealed somewhat when the band breaks into a sample of Tainted Love to wink at and tease the listener. It is an alluring encounter if without the spark of its predecessor.

The release is completed by the wonderfully dour but magnetic prowl of Greyer Shades, its melancholic air and melodic post punk like imagination at first captivating and over time simply compelling. It has a stark design reminiscent of Wire, a melodic sparkle and psych rock resonance similar to XTC, and a rhythmic and vocal seduction carrying the healthy scent of The Fall or Young Marble Giants to it and though it takes its time to fully convince, by the end of the first listen and definitely the second or third, Greyer Shades gets right under the skin to ultimately stealing the passions.

The album is done and all out there igniting and corrupting ears and hearts with relish; Boo Hoo completing and summing things up nicely. If The Tuesday Club is already your cup of earl grey then the new EP is another must have along with its counterparts but if new to the band’s notorious off-kilter punk ‘n’ roll temptation it is time to enlist with the Boo Hoo EP the call up card.

Boo Hoo, as all the other EP’s, is available now @ http://thetuesdayclub.tmstor.es/cart/product.php?id=27053

https://www.facebook.com/thisisthetuesdayclub    http://thisisthetuesdayclub.co.uk/

Pete RingMaster 16/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/