The St Pierre Snake Invasion – A Hundred Years A Day

 Photo Lor Nov

Photo Lor Nov

No doubt Halloween 2015 will be noted for numerous reasons though few maybe as thrilling to a great many people as that day in time being the moment that the long awaited debut album from The St Pierre Snake Invasion was uncaged. Fans have been waiting for a fair time to chew on its noisy dessert whilst without realising, British rock ‘n’ roll has been similarly biding time for a release like it to re-ignite its potent but smouldering landscape. A Hundred Years A Day is that incitement, a furious punk ‘n’ roll blaze of noise and alternative rock that takes all the potential of the band’s previous encounters to a new volcanic plateau.

The Bristol hailing quintet’s sound has always been an incendiary challenge on the senses and imagination, a riveting and intoxicating roar which is like that rebellious friend you know your parents and the bland norm will take an instant dislike to, especially as they lead you into mischievous deeds and salacious habits. The St Pierre Snake Invasion creates music which is brash, belligerent, and increasingly compelling, with primal beauties like A Hundred Years A Day the glorious result.

Formed in 2010, it was with debut EP Flesh the following year that The St. Pierre Snake Invasion lit, as for so many, our fires, stoking them for bigger lustful reactions with its outstanding successor Everyone’s Entitled To My Opinion in 2013. Such its continuing presence in our for pleasure playlist it is hard to believe it has been another couple of years until opening of curtains on the sonic theatre of A Hundred Years A Day. But it has and the wait has been well worth the impatience offered, a recognition needing only opener Thanks But The Answer’s No to prove.

cover_RingMaster ReviewThe song smothers ears in an initial noise smog from within which, a steely nagging groove springs its bait. As the mighty rhythmic pokes of drummer Sam James batter rising riffs, the ever distinctive vocal roar of Damien Sayell leaps out. In no time the track is stomping with heavy anthemic feet and hip swaying inducement, the guitars of Szack Notaro and Patrick Daly spinning an inescapable web of enticement for body and emotions. It is a typical TSPSI proposal in devilment and potently fresh and unique in design, even as a dirty noise rock storm.

The brilliant start never misses a persuasive beat as David Ickearumba swaggers in next on a thumping of beats as a tangy mesh of guitar wraps the calmer but no less zealous delivery of Sayell. Amongst them, the dark, slightly bestial bass temptation cast by Mark Fletcher grabs ears and an already enlivened appetite for the encounter; it’s throaty beckoning an especially potent seduction in nothing but thick lures fuelling the song. With the voice of Sayell showing another range of its psychotic mastery of expression, emotion, and ears, the track produces a rock ‘n’ roll contagion with a healthy dose of volatility to it, that tempestuousness more vocal in the stalking delight of When I See A Sycophant Fly. Bass and drums lead a swarm of sonic stings, a perpetual union even as the track swings between mellower intimidation and infectious drama as prowling confrontations of intensity line its cynical air. Both guitarists add great backing vocals across song and album, here adding calm and unpredictable breath to match the increasingly fiery maze of sound. Like a mix of Nick Cave, The Melvins, and The Dropper’s Neck, another pinnacle is sculpted within A Hundred Years A Day, the album three for three at this point.

Rock ‘n’ Roll Workshops is pure manna for noise punk fiends, its rhythmic shuffle alone irresistible and its De Staat like energy and devilry the perfect courting of feet and the passions. Under the further potent lure of Sayell’s presence, the track bounces around like a dog with a vet’s finger up its bum, exhausting and inflaming as it leads to the glorious devil bred croon of Sex Dungeons & Dragons. The darker hues of a Birthday Party and schizo charm of Mclusky collude here as the band spin a tale of intrigue, musically and narratively, in turn enticing and inciting ears and senses at every turn of craft and imagination. Again diversity upon A Hundred Years A Day is rich and compelling yet still only TSPSI in touch and character, as shown of course by the track’s successor Like A Rag To A Red Bull, it another sonic sandstorm littered with bone splitting rhythms and at forty odd seconds more effective and arousing than most multi-minute proposals elsewhere.

Jesus, Mary & Joseph Talbot has the body throwing shapes like a rag doll in the hands of a child, manipulating limbs like a crazed puppeteer as the skills of the band work resourcefully on thoughts and passions. Listening to the track you wonder if The Stooges were starting out now, this is what they would be inspired by, a wonder turning to a convinced idea as The Great Procrastinator matches the powerful success of its predecessor with its own slavery of the listener. A song which recalls early seeds of the band, songs like Last Words Of A Bent Cop from the Flesh EP, it soon builds its own particular compulsion of enterprise and intrusive devilry gripped by virulent contagion.

Eight tracks in an truthfully there has been no dip in persuasion or invention on the album, song nine, Refauxlution keeping the trend with its predatory canter equipped with tantalising sonic enterprise and a rhythmic targeting pinning ears to the wall in joyful submission. Each song is a maelstrom of physical and emotional turbulence guided by the unavoidable vocal alchemy of Sayell but as shown by Refauxlution, so sublimely crafted and imagined that you often feel relaxed and in a mellower climate as the song chews its way into the psyche.

The album is brought to a mighty close by firstly its title track, a glorious slow meandering smoulder of voice and sound which brews up a crescendo of angst fired ire to singe the senses before slipping back into its shadow thick serenade. If The Only Way Is Essex You Can Kill Me Now is given the task to follow it and end things on a high, which it does in a fuzzy tempest of hook ridden punk ‘n’ roll.

Recorded with Sean Genockey over apparently only three days, A Hundred Years A Day is the raw, live, and creative might of The St Pierre Snake Invasion in one dynamic and intoxicating place. Their previous EPs have been irresistible but there is a new depth in songwriting and sound with a persistent consistency in major success across A Hundred Years A Day. It is also an announcement that the band has not only come of creative age but opened the gateway to even bigger, bolder, and daresay brawly treats ahead.

A Hundred Years A Day is out now digitally @ http://tspsi.bandcamp.com/album/a-hundred-years-a-day and on CD @ http://tspsi.bigcartel.com/product/a-hundred-years-a-day

http://tspsi.co.uk/   http://facebook.com/thestpierresnakeinvasion http://twitter.com/tspsi

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Gelato – Daydream EP

© Chris Patmore Music Photographer

© Chris Patmore Music Photographer

Having made a potent and impressive introduction to themselves with their self-titled debut EP earlier this year, UK rockers Gelato more than back up its success and potential with successor Daydream. The three track release again ignites ears and energies with a sound openly inspired by the likes of Foo Fighters and early Queens of the Stone Age, whilst pushing its own diverse character further to the fore. It is a tantalising and relentlessly infectious adventure and further confirmation of a new exciting prospect for the British music scene.

Made up of vocalist /guitarist Drew Wynen, bassist Phil Harris, and drummer Ben Welburn, London hailing Gelato emerged in 2014 and quickly lured attention through a vibrant and energetic live presence. Airplay via BBC6 was not long in the coming either though it was that Tobin Jones (Bo Ningen, Twilight Sad, Cold Specks) recorded first EP, released this past March, that really woke up ears and awareness for the band. That broader attention is set to be pushed further with Daydream, an encounter offering more of the melodic and catchy delights which marked its predecessor so enjoyably but also venturing into an even wider expanse of flavouring to wrap the pungent hooks and grooves Gelato have already shown themselves so skilled at.

GELATO - DAYDREAM_RingMaster Review    Daydream opens with its title track and straight away has ears and imagination engaged with its first lure of guitar. Straight away the sultriness of the invitation has the scent of Josh Homme and co, but it soon becomes entangled in the imaginative twists and enterprise of Gelato; rousing hooks and tenacious riffs colluding with eagerly swiping beats and the darker bait of the bass. There is a touch of Eagles of Death Metal to the song too when it is raising its intensive punkish stomp whilst throughout, the melodic craft of the band is an invention of unpredictable and seductive prowess.

The excellent start to the EP is matched and surpassed by the outstanding Salivating, the second song floating in on an ethereal ambience veined by a gliding melody as a grounding bassline strolls below the magnetic climate. Into its enthralling stride, the track keenly merges melodic and pop infectiousness in a psych rock embrace, but it is a warm and riveting hug equipped with boisterous energy and swing. KingBathmat and An Entire Legion come to mind as the song continues to flirt and dance with ears and imagination, taking best songs honours upon the EP at the same time.

The release is brought to a fine close by Grey For Good, the lead song for the EP with its new video. Though it might have not been personal choice for single one, all three tracks potent candidates to be fair, the track saunters and pulsates with a bluesy colour to its harmonic and fiery textures, increasingly honing them into richer persuasion and inventive resourcefulness. As with all tracks, stylish hooks grip with ease as rock ‘n’ roll instincts fuel a muscular canter and sonic roar, the result another instinctive pleasure.

From the vocal and stringed craft of Wynen, to the rapacious invention of Harris and the anthemic strengths of Welburn, Daydream is a perpetually compelling and gripping offering. It is also a release which only grows more impressive over time, though it needed few plays to confirm suspicions that Gelato is a fresh breath for UK rock.

https://www.facebook.com/GelatoMusic    http://gelatomusic.bandcamp.com  http://twitter.com/gelatomusicyeah

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Shevils – The White Sea

Photo by Jørn Veberg

Photo by Jørn Veberg

With a couple of singles in as many recent months setting the scene and platform for their new album, Norwegian band Shevils now unleash The White Sea, in turn confirming themselves as one of Europe’s finest hardcore incitements. It is a ten track sonic roar of hardcore aggression and noise rock imagination, easily Oslo hailing Shevils at their most addictively inventive and punishingly ferocious.

Since coming across Shevils through their single Is This To be (Our Lives)? in 2011, the year the band also formed, they have been a perpetual adventure to anticipate and be impressed by for our and their ever growing number of fan’s ears. Every time thoughts wonder if the band has hit their pinnacle, they have pushed on again, second album Lost In Tartarus a prime example as it took the strong and gripping prowess and sound of its predecessor The Year Of The Fly, and indeed The Necropolis EP before it, both also released in the band’s first year, to new heights of quality and bold adventure. As hinted at by the singles One Thousand Years and Shivers these past few weeks, they have done it again, their third full-length The White Sea digging deeper into bold craft and invention to move forward again from its 2013 uncaged predecessor.

The core trio of Shevils, vocalist Anders Voldrønning, guitarist Andreas Andre Myrvold, and drummer Anders Emil Rønning have created a twisted and angry beast in The White Sea, its nature and intensity echoing the social and political turmoil its lyrics seed their invention and fury from. With some of the songs also co-written by former member Christoffer Gaarder, the album is a voracious tempest of sound and emotion which at times becomes a writhing flirtatiously contagious predator and in other moments is an erosive sonic tempest of intensity and ire. From start to finish though, it is a gripping and ravenously compelling adventure which in one way or another exhausts and deeply pleasures in equal measure.

shevils-the-white-sea-cover_RingMaster Review   Produced by Marcus Forsgren, The White Sea stirs into rich life with I Wear The Skies, the opener coaxing with one, two, subsequently three and four layers of rich enticement once choppy riffs lure more spikily nagging hooks, keenly jabbing beats, and finally a groove thick bass tempting, it all uniting in an explosion of noise and impassioned vocal fire. Early hooks continue to lay down their addictiveness as the song grows, expanding their bait throughout as the short but glorious track boils to an anthemically ferocious close.

The outstanding start continues with We Could Leave The World, the bass of producer Forsgren almost skipping in its throatily pulsating prowl as again guitars stir up air with their sonic teeth posing as riffs. Band vocals roar and squall around the ever enticing lead tones of Voldrønning whilst the sweeping swipes of Rønning steer things into greater virulence, a contagion perpetually stretched and shaped by the craft and enterprise of Myrvold. Managing to eclipse the previous track, it only leads to another instant pinnacle within the album, a lofty peak going by the name of One Thousand Years. The earlier mentioned single bounds in on an inescapable rhythmic enticing, its enslaving hold matched by the grouchy blaze of guitar and vocals as well as the enjoyably predatory bassline. Sonic causticity and vocal rousing continue to collide and collude within the outstanding track; three proposals in and already The White Sea is emerging as one of 2015’s essential violating puppeteers on body and imagination.

The Death Of Silence has thick bait tempting ears from its first breath, a stroking of baritone guitar swift seduction quickly aided by a just as dark bass intimidation. Voldrønning’s mix of sandy and inflamed deliveries soon hold the reins of the song, especially as it evolves into a less imposing but similarly intensive affair with guitars melodically exploring and harmonies flaming in the surroundings of the abrasively catchy encounter. As with any Shevils track there is also an underlying drama in expression and imagination, here it boldly seeding a percussive shuffle and infectious swing helping to forge one invigorating incitement.

A rawer and more corrosive atmosphere floods Black Summer next, its textures matching the air as its hardcore heart pours passion and physical ferocity down the veins of the spiralling guitar enterprise. The track is a thickly layered and delivered protagonist, a consuming smog of sound which again has satisfaction full though it is instantly overshadowed by Shivers. As natural as breathing, guitars and bass spin a web of addictive hooks as beats slowly but forcibly batter the senses. It is a punk inferno pulsating with the band’s mighty roars and sonic ingenuity, and breeding anthemic toxicity which has limbs and voice enlisted in short time, moving on to twist and manipulate the imagination and psyche with every spin of its carnivorous inventiveness and rabid energy.

Both the vindictively prowling Wordsmiths and the transfixing Fireflies keeps release and emotions aflame, the first another defiance driven hardcore/punk antagonism as infectious as it is physically scarring. Its successor soon lives up to its name, guitars breeding glowing melodies which sonically flit across the evocative canvas of the song. Once more rhythmic imagination is as potent as dynamic tendrils of sound, uniting in an engrossing and wonderfully demanding onslaught, though a searing tapestry outweighed in spite by the hellacious When Will I See You Again?, a brutal assault tempered by catchy adventure in songwriting and individual craft.

It tempestuous tsunami is emulated by the album’s closing title track, The White Sea even more erosive and smothering as its sonic density and raging emotions devour and ignite the senses. It is the least welcoming track on the album, but no slouch in potent lures with haunting keys creeping through ears in the shadows of the crawling storm whilst a catchiness of sorts seeps into every volatile intent and trespass of riffs and scything beats.

It is a thoroughly exhausting end to the album, the band at its most creative and exploratory whilst freeing every ounce of their emotion and dark depths in a startling oppressive temptation. As their second album leapt on from the first, so The White Sea does again. It might not be as big a step on the surface in some ways but it is their most inventive one making Shevils one of the big excitements in noise invention. Like a hybrid of Cancer Bats, Refused, Sofy Major, and Melvins, this a band ready to stand aside such names whilst scarring your senses.

The White Sea will be self-released on 6th November.

http://www.shevils.com   https://www.facebook.com/shevils

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Cavaverman – Tales From Cavafistool

Cavaverman _RingMaster Review

It was Johnny Rose, the band behind Birmingham rock ‘n’ rollers Thirteen Shots and the independent label Undead Artists, that pushed our gaze the way of Italian horror punks Cavaverman, and boy are we grateful that he did. The trio released their new album Tales From Cavafistool this past Halloween, a thirteen track proposal that rocks with the bloodlust horror punk should always do but equally with an imagination unafraid to involve other bold flavours and twists of invention. The result is a fascinating and seriously rousing stomp fuelled with a potential that says even bigger and bolder adventures are ahead, so time the world woke up to the sonic zombie hunters.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Sal Champion, bassist Apocalypse Giò, and drummer Doktor Hell, it is fair to say that Cavaverman wear many of their inspirations on their sleeve the likes of The Ramones, Misfits, Alkaline Trio, and Entombed included, weaving them into their own contagious and visceral romances of sound and horror. As previous releases like Dead Brains For Brain Dead and James Dead showed, at times there is no escaping the familiarity to those influences but more often than not they merely spice fresh pools of bloodied Cavaverman imagination.

Tales From Cavafistool quickly stirs the blood and passions with opener Vampiro; a pull back on a shotgun the spark to a charge of spicy riffs and thumping beats driven by the potent tones of Champion. With a snatch of psychobilly to its character and straight forward rock ‘n’ roll in its instincts, the song rumbles and swaggers with expectations feeding horror punk tenacity and zeal, but with a wealth of enterprise it only thickly excites before Dead In Berlin offers its own breed of lusty punk ‘n’ roll. As in the opener and many more, Misfits is an obvious spicing but one, as suggested earlier, honed into the ways of Cavaverman with fresh and imaginative resourcefulness. The rhythms of Giò and Hell stalk and grumble magnetically throughout its scavenging whilst Champion shows himself as alluring with fingers on strings as voice on lyrics.

Cfront_RingMaster Review     The more restrained Yellow King shows a fuzzier melodic string to the band’s creative bow whilst still creating a virulent offering hard for body and voice to resist whilst the mighty Green Goblin is a two and a half minute addiction that you will be crooning long after leaving its and the album’s side. Familiarity is once more a potent hue but entangled in a pungent pop punk weave, the track is like all your best friends partying in the ears.

Such its contagion and slavery upon the passions, the following Don’t Cross The Streams has a harder task to shine alongside but its efforts are strong and enjoyable, especially with its excellent sinister entrance on intimidatingly anthemic rhythms. Into its stride, the song loses some of its potency in energy and impact but it still has feet romping and pleasure aflame by the time it makes way for Inside You and straight after Hero. The first of the pair also embraces the punk pop side of the band, breaking into an easy going and vibrant rocker before its successor grows from a scuzz kissed croon under atmospheric cold into an impassioned serenade with rising crescendos. The track might be another not quite matching some of those around it, but what it lacks in a persuasive spark it more than makes up with in bold and fiery blends of varied rock styles to show the strength of the band’s songwriting and imagination.

Lora Ashley is a delicious straight forward incitement of hooks and united vocals, an inevitable horror punk sing-a-long raising the spirits and greed ready for the drama laded rock ‘n’ roll of Dead Boys Of Summer. Resistance is futile here too as the track prowls ears with its sturdy rhythms and grinning hooks, vocals the final lure in a lustful anthem. Irresistibility continues in the old school punk joins fifties spawned rock ‘n’ roll of Don’t Worry About Me next, the song something you could imagine a collusion between The Damned, Flogging Molly, and Calabrese producing whilst the irresistible Teenwolf is less than two minutes of boisterous incitement with anthemic effect on body and emotions.

     Tales From Cavafistool is finished off by fiery rocker Just Another Day where blues spicing adds to rich flames of melodic and heavy rock aligning to a rockabilly swing, and finally the short sepia toned instrumental epilogue of Dawn Of The Cavaverman. The final piece is like the closing of the theatre curtain at the close of a creative triumph, and that is just what Tales From Cavafistool is, a triumph from a band previously in the shadows but now bounding forward with a real punch. As uniqueness and imagination continues to grow within the craft of Cavaverman, there is no reason to dismiss the thought that something special for horror punk is brewing in Italy.

Tales From Cavafistool Cavaverman is out now via Undead Artists and @ https://cavaverman.bandcamp.com/album/tales-from-cavafistool

https://www.facebook.com/Cavaverman

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Raising Jupiter – Chrome

RJ_RingMaster Review

Getting rather hooked on recently released single Give Me The News, a look at the EP it came from was only going to be the next step for us. Song and EP are the creations of Irish trio Raising Jupiter, a band beginning to cause a stir on both sides of the Atlantic, and understandably going by their current releases.

The Cork rock band consists of vocalist/guitarist Dave Aitken, drummer/backing vocalist John McGrath, and bassist Sean Scott Baird, a threesome coming together around 2013 and making a strong impression with their self-financed and released debut album A Better Balance the following year. It spawned a couple of singles in Riding on a Wave and Tight Rope which found potent support and airplay over in the US via Network365 among others, and in turn catching the attention of than legendary producer Beau Hill who offered to work with the band. The second of the two singles set 2015 off in fine style for Raising Jupiter, its success followed by the band taking its first live steps into the UK at Camden Underworld whilst Give Me The News capped a great twelve months for the band with its enticement as a single, its release reinforcing the impressive lure made by the Chrome EP out a couple of weeks or so before it.

cover_RingMaster Review     Mixed and mastered by Hill, the EP quickly fires up ears and appetite with its opener, the mightily infectious and persuasive Give Me The News. From its first breath, guitar and bass unite in a rich coaxing framed by the firm beats of McGrath. The initial guitar melody continues to entice as the expressive tones of Aitken lures the listener into a ridiculously captivating chorus. Within one hug of its rousing crescendo, it is impossible not to find yourself adding a new voice to its tempting whilst feet easily tap to punchy rhythms as hips sway to the sonic enterprise of Aitken’s guitar. There is a familiarity to the song, especially around that chorus, which defies pinning down but it is merely extra spice to the irresistible design and evolving adventure of the track. The song offers few big surprises but enjoyment is high so there are no complaints.

The same can be said of the other two songs making up Chrome, with similar pleasure found. The next song is a remixed version of These are the Things, a track from the band’s first album. The EP shows a definite step forward in songwriting between album and EP, the two new songs on offer outshining the sandwiched second offering on the EP in depth and sound but there is also no denying with sultry melodic enterprise and emotive vocals strength, not forgetting a prowess in bringing all of these engaging attributes into one shining tempting, that the song leaves only pleasure in its wake.

Closing things up is No, a track with a blues spicing to its reserved yet tenaciously sculpted stroll. It is a gait leading into eighties hued contagiousness, an infection biding its time but slowly strengthening its seducing from the opening chorus onwards; never erupting but becoming rosier as melodic imagination entwines vocals and verse. There is equally feistiness to the track which also never gets its head but it too adds only more creative enticement to the richness and fascination of the song.

As shown by their current single, Raising Jupiter also have the knack of ensuring their songs get more persuasive and riveting with subsequent listens, a quality Chrome definitely benefits from. With rumours of a new EP in the works, Raising Jupiter is a band well worth keeping a close ear on.

The Chrome EP, as latest single Give me the News, is out now through iTunes and Amazon.

http://www.raisingjupiter.com   https://www.facebook.com/raisingjupiter  https://twitter.com/raising_jupiter

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

In Fall – Delete

In Fall_RingMaster Review

From Ekaterinburg, Russia, In Fall is a gothic rock duo consisting of Shade (vocals, bass, programming) and Eric (guitar). Recently they released third album Delete, a collection of dark yet hope filled, melancholy soaked tracks that simply capture the imagination. Aligning contrasts within a blend of creative intricacies which themselves are paired with simplicity of tone and emotional openness, the release is a fascinating and increasingly enjoyable offering suggesting the band are ready to prompt broad attention.

The background to the band and its members are not openly offered in profiles and press release, but 2012 saw the first In Fall release in the shape of the Coffin shores EP whilst a year later debut album Charm appeared with its successor How can you fall in love? coming in 2014. Recently linking up with GlobMetal Promotions, In Fall now has Delete to entice and inspire the imagination, a success in motion from its first touch.

Delete cover_RingMaster Review   Sometimes starts things off, a lone piano casting a classical air as thicker sounds brew around it, guitars and rhythms a shadowy tempting courted by an even darker bass lure. The voice of Shade has a mellow but emotive intensity which lies separate to the melodic beauty and metallic intimidation around it, but links all with its potent plainer hue. For ears, the song and subsequent album provokes thoughts of bands like Sisters Of Mercy, The Mission, and Gene Loves Jezebel, though equally as the likes of the album’s title track takes over, thoughts of Type O Negative and more so an emotionally detached version of Black are also nurtured. For the main though as keys seduce and shadows encroach, vocal croon and melodies caressing within a muscular climate, In Fall create something specific to themselves becoming more impressive and enticing with every listen.

Through tracks like the climatically smouldering You say and the more tenacious rock ‘n’ roll of Wednesday ears are pulled deeper into the release and its romantic lure around ironic and openly reflective lyrics. Both songs offer individual proposals in sound and design which again only increase in persuasion as their theatre of emotion and rich textures is increasingly revealed before the post punk shaped Brainbox bewitches an already happy appetite with niggly riffs and a bestial bassline around elegant keys and subsequently seducing strings. Vocally Shade deviates little from his prime emotionally cold delivery, which at times is a temper to the flames of beauty aside him, but always he stretches it to rise and fall with the heart and intensity of a track, and as here always to great effect.

Could be similarly weaves a fusion of post punk and gothic/melodic metal resourcefulness into a haunting embrace whilst from a warm dance becoming emotively darker and physically irritable, Beautiful day crawls into the psyche and passions to take best song honours. It is a relentless prowl of ears, a magnetic spark for the imagination, and lingering sinister hug for the senses, and quite superb.

That great post punk breeding lines the melodic call of synths across More, the song a transfixing siren of sound reminding of eighties band Leitmotiv. The feel of that era is a recurring and welcome spice across certainly the post punk and gothic colouring within Delete, its provocative melancholic scent again flowing through Dust even as a carnivorous bassline seeds a volatile atmosphere which, though it never quite erupts, is a constant intensity to the enthralling drama.

The album concludes with firstly From above, a lighter and catchier affair on ears, and finally the raw emotive intensity and sonic fire of Over. Each song leaves ears and pleasure full and the impressiveness of Delete enhanced even if not quite matching up to the potency of tracks before them. They certainly add to an album which just gets stronger and more engrossing though, not forgetting one more enjoyable with every encounter.

In Fall, as previously for us, is likely to be an unknown outside of their homeland for most but that deserves to change from Delete alone, a release you seriously should be checking out.

Delete is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/in.fall.gothic

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Absorb – Vision Apart

Absorb_RingMaster Review

There are a few metal bands around the globe with the name Absorb, but certainly standing out in sound alone are the German death metallers carrying the title. Emerging back in 1989, the Bavarian quartet released a pair of demos before splitting up in 1994 but thirteen years later, founders Pfisty and Jochen reformed the band with new and fresh ideas bubbling up to take a sound already unafraid to twist and evolve its death metal seeding, to new potent places.

With a new line-up in place around the original pair, Absorb released Dealing with Pain in 2010 to strongly welcoming reactions from media and fans alike. As their live presence embraced shows with the likes of Obscura, Cannibal Corpse, Pestilence, One Man Army, Sodom, Vader, Hatesphere, The Black Daliah Murder, Morbid Angel, and Arch Enemy amongst a great many over recent years, more personnel changes were gone through, eventually leading to the current line-up of vocalist Volker and bassist Daniel alongside guitarist Pfisty and drummer Jochen who now the unleash the band’s new EP Vision Apart. A gnarly tempest of four diversely flavoured extreme metal furies, the release is a ravenous and rabid confrontation suggesting that Absorb, who recently signed with GlobMetal Promotions, have tapped into a vein of creative venom that could awaken broad attention.

Vision Apart Cover Final_RingMaster Review    The EP starts with a predatory gripping of ears through Perfect Whore, nagging riffs a perpetual tempting as vocals and drums descend greedily on the senses. With the bass a more reserved but no less potent protagonist in the mix, grabbing its moment to grumble within breaks with toxic prowess, the track climbs over the senses and imagination like a serpent. The sonic tendrils of the guitar are as seductive as they are venomous, still flirting with virulence as hostile eruptions unite in a bruising tempest. The track is a superb start to the EP, death metal infused with slithers of other varied metal and noise induced invention.

The following Los Muertos de Hambre is just as flavoursome within its carnal turbulence, again acidic grooves and alluring riffs veining the smog of sonic intensity. Clean vocals bring another enjoyable colour to the forceful prowl, their delivery adding a scent of heavy metal to the creative savagery. Though not quite matching the plateau of its predecessor, the song is a fascinating tapestry of styles and fluid ideas, something definitely fresh and appetising to the more formula genre releases escaping this past year.

The song Undead springs with a similar breeding to the previous track, but quickly revealing its own insidious character in presence and imagination with an impressing mix of vocal enterprise again adding weight and texture to the track. With the bestial sounds at its core and Volker’s great guttural delivery a glorious violation as addictive as the whirling sonic lacing of guitar, the track opener fires up the ears and passions with instinctive ease before making way for closing incitement World Stops Turning.

The final track stalks to the thrash seeded backdrop of driving riffs and rhythmic barbarism interspersed with slower meanders, creating the most destructive and cancerous moment on the release, and another seriously riveting trespass to get involved with. Like Vision Apart as a whole, it is hard to say major originality is being cultivated but the freshness to it all, and the blending of contrasting flavours creates something highly enjoyable and different to contemplate.

Their name might be relatively common but certainly Absorb’s sound has a personality of its own which is very easy to suggest trying out.

The Vision Apart EP is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/Absorbmetal   http://www.absorb-metal.eu/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/