Pigs – Wronger

pigs_2015_RingMaster Review

If you are looking for a noise rock treat to end the impending year’s end on a high, we have the new Pigs album to suggest. Equally if you are looking for a ferocious punk rock tempest, or an uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll confrontation, Wronger fits the bill perfectly too. The new album from the New York City trio of Dave Curran from Unsane, Jim Paradise of Player’s Club and Freshkills, and Andrew Schneider (renowned producer with the likes of Cave In, Converge, Made Out of Babies, Unsane, and Keelhaul on his CV), is a brawl you will only get increasingly excited to be swallowed up by. It is a blaze of scarring imagination as virulently addictive as it is mercilessly abrasive, and indeed bracing. Pigs made a mighty debut with first album You Ruin Everything in 2012, cemented and pushed their refreshing presence with the Gaffe EP the following year, but Wronger is a whole new caustic bitch slap of pleasure and aggressive adventure to get fired up by.

It opens with the sonic infestation of A Great Blight, a diseased web of noise hypnotically living up to the creeping invasiveness of its title. The instrumental piece crawls over the senses and into the psyche, eroding defences with its repetitious whilst The Life In Pink waits in the wings to fill its departing void. The second track though rather than quickly assaulting ears weaves in on a flirtatious hook cast by Curran’s guitar, its successful lure shaking under the impact of Paradise’s composed and resonating beats. In no time the bass of Schneider growls with a predacious passion whilst the riffs and vocals of Curran add grizzled attitude and prowess to the song’s emerging heavy stroll. It is a raw and thickly enticing bluster, tempestuous rock ‘n’ roll which ensures an inescapable persuasion, especially with the re-occurring delicious hook which sets things rolling.

pigs_wronger_cover_RingMaster Review     The following Bet It All On Black leaps in with a punk swagger and impossible to resist rhythmic devilry, willing feet and hips recruited as rapidly as ears and imagination through another delicious hook which this time has a whiff of post punk addictiveness to it. Schneider swings an equally magnetic and infectious groove through his ever bestial toned bass, another spice to the gripping drama and threat of the track, an intimidation emulated in Amateur Hour In Dick City though it pursues a more hard rock flavouring to its noise rock volatility. As in all songs, things evolve though, turn in on themselves and bring new twists and exploits to contemplate. Without quite matching its predecessors, there is only an infection to the eventful song which flows eagerly before Mope descends on the listener with its scuzz woven tapestry of meandering grooves, intoxicating hooks, and predatory rhythms. A smothering cloud of raw noise is the best description, this veined by virulent temptations and, within certain brief partings of its worrisome clouds, melodic toxicity for major addictiveness.

     Wrap It Up is the same, its hostile climate and abusive physical invention increasingly persuasive with every sonic lancing and rally of rhythmic bullying colluding in something quite bewitching as it corrodes the senses. Imagine Joy Division meets Unsane and you get a sense of part of the excellent encounter, though again it is a proposition shifting tact and character minute by minute.

The Cajun twang of Mouth Dump and its thumping beats around a trio of spoken vocals spark thoughts next, its short insight a respite yet provocateur in a way setting up the scathing roar of Make Sure To Forget, another sonically cancerous slice of punk/noise agitation with its own tasty Buzzcocks scented hook. As seriously pleasing as it is, it does not rival in success other songs around it, emphasizing their might, and is unlucky to be followed by the majorly outstanding Bug Boy, a song which makes you forget the past three or so minutes as soon as it scurries under the skin. Featuring guest vocals from ex-Made Out of Babies/Battle of Mice front woman Julie Christmas, the track is a ravenous tempest once again entwining imagination infesting grooves and hooks, barbarous rhythms, and a vocal bedlam to get greedy over.

Wronger is brought to a close by firstly its physically cantankerous title track and lastly the extensive bellow of Donnybrook. Both songs grip forcibly as they abrase and tempt, the first hitting its sweet spot around midway when it dips into a haunting melodic aside still walled by raw shadows and waiting to bellow sonic animosity. Its eight minute successor prowls and lurches through ears with doomy breath and volatile temperament, becoming more unpredictable and magnetic as a warm calm emerges from its erosive landscape and in turn brews its own dark imposing atmosphere which becomes the dominate wind of fascination. A slow burner compared to some, the track is undoubtedly a mighty end to a thoroughly enjoyable trespass.

The album is easily Pigs finest moment to date, but you get the feeling still just a step to bigger and bolder things from the band. As Christmas lists are being drawn up, Wronger is one to place at the top for all violent rock ‘n’ roll fans with no regrets found through this thrilling beast

Wronger is out now via Solar Flare Records on 12” vinyl, CD, and digitally @ http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/wronger

http://www.pigsnyc.com     https://www.facebook.com/pigsnyc

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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