Warfaith – Wise Man Is Dead

warfaith_RingMaster Review

Though there is an old school breeding to their sound, as debut album Wise Man Is Dead shows whilst storming the barricades, equally French thrashers Warfaith infuse just as potent twists of modern and varied ideation into its ferocious character. It brings a wonderful blend of raw and inventive thrash metal drawing on its various decades, and though the release is definitely recognisably schooled in the genre’s breeding days, it replaces major originality with inventive and fiercely enjoyable rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in 2012, its origins seeded in many bands such as Violator or Warfare before then, the Nancy quintet quickly sparked their local scene into supporting life with their live presence and their first pair of tracks in Terrorist and Spit on the Cross. The following year saw the recording and release of the Blood And War EP; six tracks released that October helping to enable the band to venture further afield within the metal underground. Now it is the turn of first album Wise Man Is Dead, a release sure to light up ears for thrash around its birth but with plenty to please all of its fans even without stirring up particularly new pastures for the genre.

warfaith-album-face-aplatit_800_RingMaster Review   Influences to Warfaith include the likes of Slayer, Soulfly, Sepultura, Cannibal Corpse, Scar Symmetry, and Pantera, and that hints at more going on than just a vintage thrash incitement as the opening pair of full tracks to Wise Man Is Dead confirm after the sonically enticing Intro. It’s melodically acidic and accomplished coaxing leads into the album’s title track door, it exploding with ravenous rhythms and vocals across a scourge of violent riffs and instantly infectious incitement. The hellacious onslaught relaxes a slither as the track hits is barbarous stroll, the bass of Moon a great steely lure within the sonic web cast by guitarists Jojo and Odian. Driven on by the full roar of vocalist Max and the vicious swings of drummer Igor, the song continually shifts in gait and intensity, enterprise and maliciousness without even lessening its fury before Jesus Sucks erupts with irritable sinews forging antagonistic rhythms within another richly flavoursome weave of enticing grooves and imposing riffs; it all hostile and all thoroughly enjoyable.

Max brings a punkish element to his tones on the track which seems to spark the same in the sounds of Crack’s Whore straight after, the track a tempest which has a thick hardcore whisper to its torrential nagging of bestial riffs and bass grouchiness, and indeed the increasingly raging vocals which also slips in to spoken delivery with the same ire in tow within the attack. Once more the guitars unveil sonic and melodic slithers but primarily the song is a rancorous squall to light the soul, only relenting when it has to make way for the spicily hook loaded revelry of Purgatory. As in its predecessors, twists constantly bring a familiar air but with inventive freshness to the ear, and indeed contagion, which just hits the spot and the want from any thrash fuelled offering.

Terrorist keeps the good times boiling in the system, blood inflamed by the rabid tempest thrust through ears and the vocal union between Max and guest Nico Xanort; their contrasting tones of spite and ferocity a union as enjoyable as the spiralling invention from the guitars and rip-roaring tenacity of the song as a destructive whole. It is a brutal anthem impossible not to enlist in as equally the even more caustically abrasing Furious Pig, and after it, the merciless Kill With Truth. In their joint uncompromising extreme metal turbulence, inviting hooks and sonic endeavour bring individual adventure against the dark hearted aligning of senses battering and inventive drums and an addictive bass tempting, especially in the second of the pair which is a beast of virulent violence and temptation and arguably the most unique and exploratory song on the release, even in its tsunami of maliciousness.

There is no let-up to the musical and lyrical vehemence with Warslave, the track a horde like surge of rancorous bass bait and insatiable riffs pushed on by the great punkish squalls of Max, or Addiction right after. It devours ears like a war machine, pressing on with relentless authority whilst spewing flames of catchy enterprise and impassioned incitement lyrically and emotionally. The song is glorious and once again it has to be said the bass of Moon is wonderfully demonic in its voice and delicious in its growling texture, as shown one final time in the closing Redemption. It is actually the most predictable and thus less impacting song on the album but still brings Wise Man Is Dead to a mightily pleasing close.

It has to be said that Warfaith had us held in the first listen but the hooks only went deeper with ever subsequent listen. Wise Man Is Dead is definitely a release which just gets richer and bolder with every encounter so do give it the time it deserves; you will be rewarded.

Wise Man Is Dead is out now via most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 17/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Either Way – Behind The Light

either way_RingMaster Review

Hailing from Compiegne in France, Either Way is a melodic death metal proposition which makes a rather appetising introduction to itself with Behind The Light. The band is the solo adventure of Ludovic Ciszewski, a vocalist/multi-instrumentalist who after playing in an array of bands, including Scythians, Osm’oz, Dead N Crazy and currently Monolyth, decided to start his own project to undertake dark melodic explorations inspired by the likes of Before The Dawn and Dark Tranquillity. Behind The Light is the debut release from Ciszewski, with just solo guitar contributions from Mich alongside his own sole endeavours recorded in his home studio.

The album opens with Across the Light, and a beacon of crystalline keys and floating harmonies which just reflects on the imagination like the sun on water. Subsequently dark tones of bass and slow but strong beats join the brewing shadows spread by the guitar, the emerging atmosphere only growing until its brief body evolves into the following Redemption. Swiftly sonic and rhythmic drama is striding purposefully through ears, an early gothic climate initially smothered but reappearing in equal tempting as the raw vocal tones of Ciszewski come forward. Personal tastes took time to come to terms with his certainly accomplished but distinctive and generally samey delivery, a wish for more variation the main lingering request as when he does expand his vocal presence within the album, it brings a new light to songs. Nevertheless it is a raw texture which does work well with the aggressive nature of the song and against the melodic radiance lining the enjoyable start to Behind The Light.

cover_RingMaster Review     Phoenix comes next, it too opening with a classical caress of keys before being joined by more robust and rugged lures spawned by riffs and punchy beats. Though not intimidating, there is immediately a dark air to the song which breeds a rousing and commanding canter lit by the still bewitching keys and the aggressive nature of the guitars and voice. Progressive enterprise mingles with death bred malevolence perfectly, the track like a dangerous but alluring flame just getting more intensive and compelling with every passing minute before making way for the similarly enticing Always Look To The Star and in turn the darkly reflective Evil In Me. The first of the two is a rousing fusion of symphonic and melodic expression with a predatory turbulence guided by the caustic tones of Ciszewski. The track borders on spellbinding, the guitars a riveting persuasion merging numerous styles and ideation and the keys just emotive beauty on the senses. Its successor from a melodically hued and vigorous entrance slips into darker depths of emotion amidst a threatening atmosphere, Ciszewski ‘s voice early on pushes its diversity a little for the first time and to great effect, though it is the guitars which steal the plaudits within the provocative and intensive embrace of ears.

The opening bass welcome is the first irresistible temptation in the outstanding Red Eyes, a track which has a touch of Type O Negative to its emotive outpouring and roaming shadows. Once more keys and guitars entwine for a sonic narrative to spark the imagination and excite ears whilst the rhythms create a commanding skeleton as ripe with contagion as the fiery sounds around them. The best track upon Behind The Light it carries a catchy swagger but loses none of the inciting theatre and dark creative flesh which colours all songs on the album.

The jagged riff built scenery of Faces leads into an equally riveting and highly imaginative landscape of melodic intimacy and at times bruising ferociousness, though this time it is magnetically tempered by the warmer and colourful exploits of keys and for once clean vocals. Generally the impassioned energy and aggressive urgency of tracks overshadows the melancholic beauty to great effect but this time it is the other way round, and followed by a more equal union within the relatively lighter body and funkiness of Trouble In My Mind. There is a noir bred intrigue and sinister resonance to the melodic sky of the song, a haunting beauty which coats its hearty stroll whilst after it, Scarecrow takes its dark edge into stronger ravenous depths for an encounter which takes time to come alive in thoughts but impresses more with every listen.

The release is completed by Black Soul, its first touch a mesmeric piano bred hug full of emotion and elegance. It is accompanied a little further in by a physical narrative of footsteps on crunchy stone before blossoming into another theatre of craft and invention with returning clean vocals as appealing as the ever evocative keys and guitar imagination, not forgetting spirit arousing rhythms.

Creatively and musically, Behind The Light is thorough pleasure, a release continually revealing more with every play, and it is only to our ear’s loss that the vocals do not hit the same spot, something which will not apply to most enjoying our recommendation to treat yourself with the first Either Way album.

Behind The Light is available now from online stores.

Pete RingMaster 17/09/2015

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Smash Hit Combo – Playmore

shc_RingMaster Review

Released recently, Playmore, the new album from French rap metallers Smash Hit Combo, is a proposition loaded with familiar elements and a rugged character which seemingly wears its influences openly, yet from this breeds something enjoyably fresh and certainly fiercely rousing. It storms the senses like some recognisable tempest generating an easy persuasion without prominently feeding expectations and carries a crossover roar of sound which reminds of many, yet twists it into something that, if not majorly unique, has the Smash Hit Combo hallmark.

The Cernay hailing sextet began in 2004 with the varied background and tastes of its members creating a mesh of rap, hip-hop, and thrash lined metal. Early demo Next Level was unveiled the following year before debut album Hardcore Gamer was released in 2007, an encounter awakening stronger attention and praise from fans. Two years later its successor Nolife emerged to stronger acclaim of fans and media; the release showing a more mature and varied colour to their music which continued to grow and move on through full-lengths Loading and Reset of 2010 and 2012 respectively. Playmore shows another evolution with darker metal tones aligned to jagged djent enterprise and nu metal devilment, it all colluding with the band’s rapcore heart. As suggested it brings a familiar aspect to its body through this union of styles yet makes an invigorating proposal for ears and appetite from start to finish.

cover_RingMaster Review   Playmore opens with In Game, electro hints within a sonic mist lacing ears before the song erupts in a tenacious shuffle of biting riffs, swirling acidic guitar, and imposing rhythms, all driven by the dual vocal raps of Paul Vuillequez and Maxime Keller. As the music, the pair’s delivery shifts and turns with clean vocals additionally fuelling the warm chorus whilst subsequently gaining greater ferocity and aggression in their lyrical spits. It is a thoroughly engaging and bracing mix which continues to leap around snarling and alluring before Sous pression takes over with an initially similar regime but is quickly uncaging its own melodic and predatory mix. It does not quite have the impact of the first song yet with the guitars of Baptiste Ory and Anthony Chognard spinning an engagingly textured web made up of melodic soars of enterprise and carnivorous growls aimed at the senses, it is a perpetually enthralling offering again as impressive in its vocals and harmonies as it is in tempestuous sound.

Baka hits a major high spot for the album next; its climatic air and virulently twisted landscape complete with aggressive attitude, a bracing and throatily roaring terrain of cartilage grinding riffs and bone shuddering beats from drummer Hincker Brice. Like Meshuggah in a salacious fling with Beastie Boys and (Hed) P.E., the track is a bestial treat wrapped in sonic imagination with the bass of Matthieu Willer the most predacious element in the outstanding storm.

Both Quart de siècle and Time Attack thoroughly please, if not quite reaching the same peak as those before. The first is a melodically bred persuasion bringing thoughts of The Kennedy Soundtrack to the fore before corrupting its calm with volatile intensity then restarting the cycle over again. Its successor is a bruising seduction with an industrial like haunting to its relatively peaceful atmosphere and tortuous angst through to its primal expulsions of sound and emotion, and like its predecessor, fully captivating with new nuances revealed in every listen.

The brief melancholic and electronically sinister instrumental of B3t4 warms the imagination for the crunching touch and stark landscape of Animal nocturne, the song another ripe with volatility in its presence and heart. In certain moments it stalks the senses and in others has the psyche embroiled in a maelstrom of melodic expression and deranged djent seeded animosity, rhythms and bass enhancing the mix with their fluid swings from antagonism to gentle temptation.

An opening melodic cast serenade opens up Déphasé straight after, its opening lure soon over run by intense emotion and ravenous sound but continuing to lay its highly persuasive colours throughout the raw and oasis like calm of the excellent voracity of noise and creative attitude. Its triumph is quickly matched and then ferociously surpassed by the hellacious turmoil of Le vrai du faux, the song a furnace of scuzzy guitar, waspish grooves and barbarous rhythms, again guided by just as varied and impassioned vocals. Flirting with some Limp Bizkit contagion as it gets more ferocious, musically savage, and enterprising, the track plants another big favourite moment in the body of Playmore.

It is a pinnacle closely repeated by the technically bedlamic and compelling Irréversible, where again elegant calm and ravishing hostility in sound and energy collide in a skilled and constantly evolving union. Arguably the most involved and boldest song on the album and one of its most enjoyably fascinating, it blisters flesh and withers the senses whilst equally exciting the imagination and seizing the passions; it another best track candidate with increasing persuasion with every involvement between ears and band.

Playmore is concluded by 48H, a partly English sung offering vibrantly merging sparkling harmonies and vocal prowess with an undulating atmosphere of raw emotion and reassuring calm. It is a great end to an increasingly enjoyable release. Many tracks share closely matching tones and templates and as suggested before, each comes with sounds you can easily imagine inspirations of, but most importantly the album just holds attention and thick satisfaction in its hand from first to last note. Smash Hit Combo deserves broader spotlights and Playmore just might be the key.

Playmore is available now via Slam Disques from online stores and at the band’s Bigcartel store.

Pete RingMaster 17/09/2015

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/