From the metal bred heart of Italy: Avoral

Avoral_RingMaster Review

Earlier this year, Underground Metal Alliance released their 2015 compilation of the best independent and striking band from the Italian metal scene. It was an impressive encounter insight to the underground scene in Italy and introduction to a host of imagination and invention fuelled bands. Once such proposition was Milan based epic metallers Avoral, a quintet creating a sound as inciting for ears as it is for the imagination. The first of a series of interviews we caught up with bassist Bolthorn from the band to explore its origins, debut album, and being part of the thrilling compilation from UMA.

Hello Bolthorn, thanks for talking with us.

As an introduction can you give us some background you all and how the band came together?

Hi to you and thanx for your interest!

Avoral were born in 2012, after many circumstances and line-up changes, from the merger of previous power-epic metal projects with Ged (lead guitar), Legion (rhythm guitar) and Frank (vocals) and the meeting with Bolthorn (bass) and Nurgan (drums) who came from a symphonic black metal project.

In 2014 we signed with Club Inferno, a division of My Kingdom Music, historical Italian label, and released our first full length album War Is Not Over

For newcomers can you provide a break-down of your diverse sound?

We play a particular kind of epic metal, atmospheric and structured but also hinted with other influences and elements coming from other genres, like Viking and black metal, prog, thrash… We let our minds and inspiration fly free on the instruments, not limiting it to the classic clichés of one certain style.

It’s kind of a combination of fast rhythms, atmospheric parts, violent riffs and ballads, all conveyed to an unique musical aim

Avoral4_RingMaster ReviewWhat are the primary inspirations for the band and you as musicians?

We actually listen to a very large range of musical proposals, from Viking and black scene, to prog, folk, gothic, power and epic… Of course we all love Blind Guardian and all that stream, but as said we don’t want to limit ourselves in a unique direction. We just want to be Avoral

You are part of the impressive line-up on the new UMA compilation album. How did you get to be involved with the release?

We already knew UMA before this compilation, we worked with them for other releases and events, but surely when they proposed us to be part of the competition for the UMA Compilation this sounded very interesting to us, for many reasons. The wide and very heterogeneous audience, the way UMA works, the possibility to be involved in a release with other very good bands we also know musically and personally… In other words, we are very happy to be part of it, it is moving quite well in Italy and also outside the national confines.

I assume the choice of song for this kind of release is never an easy decision. What was the reason or spark in choosing the song which features on the release?

It was not an easy choice, actually. The title track of the album is the first song we officially released back in 2014 and it gained many positive reviews and views on the audio streaming sites, therefore this was surely a good way to increase its exposure, but there were also other songs we were considering, like Journey to the Glory (heavier but also dreaming) or I’ll Rise Again (more structured and epic). Anyway, listeners and reviewers who still did not know it liked War Is Not Over and it gave us the possibility to be found out by new people, so we’ re happy with our final choice

With some bands there might be the urge to pick an easy ear friendly option in song to lure new listeners in the kind of opportunity the compilation offered, but I sense, as with all involved on the album, that you went for something which showed the depth and richly varied textures in your music?

Definitely! We’ re not interested in making “easy” music for people to like it, nor any other easy choice to lure higher audience. Of course there is some more relaxed part on the album, but we have a lot of structured and complex parts in our music and decided to show ourselves in a way that could represent its variety as much as possible. Our ideal listeners have to be open minded and not searching for the typical epic metal song/album, if you know what I mean!

Tell us about your current release which people might like to explore off the back of the compilation.Avoral album_RingMaster Review

As you said, War Is Not Over has many varied textures within its songs. It is a concept album and then it narrates different contexts and episodes of the story, therefore it is needed for every song to have its own features and backgrounds, from heavy to theatrical, calm, progressive… For this and other reasons we decided to have some special guest on the album: Maurizio Cardullo (Folkstone) at bagpipes and flutes, Laura Brancorsini (ex Furor Gallico, The Clan) at the violins, Simone Malan (Henderwyd) at the cello, and Davide Valerini (Obsolete Theory) at the hardcore vocals; the guys made an impressive work and it’s been a great pleasure to work with them!

How as a band does the songwriting generally come about?

Story comes first of all. This means that in our concept we all know how the events are flowing and which consequences they will have, so the music has to represent this at its best. Of course we do not meet in our rehearsals room and mechanically say “ok, new chapter will be this so tonight we will compose heavy stuff, while tomorrow slow” and so on, but we convey our music in the direction the story is taking.

Ged usually comes out with the first riffs of a new song, but the process is totally collaborative and everyone can propose new parts or modifications. There is no limit, no boundaries for us, we just let our inspiration flow free

What inspired the lyrical side of your songs and indeed War Is Not Over?

As a concept album, lyrics are all focused on a certain story, close to the epic and fantasy literature (also the moniker “Avoral” comes from that). Metaphorically, it is like a trip through the life of our character with all its vicissitudes and problems, struggling to find a balance to his internal war between good and evil that, as the title says, unlikely will find an end

The compilation suggests that Italian underground metal is on a creative and inventive high right now. How do you find it on the inside and how hard is it for emerging bands to make any headway in attracting attention there?

Emergent metal music in Italy is living a sort of “new era”. While some year ago, most of the bands here used to play the same genres (mostly thrash and death metal) not searching for a real originality in their proposals, in the last couple of years I’ve discovered a great number of bands composing really good and “fresh” music, trying to go beyond the limits and the borders with quite interesting experimentations.

On the other side, problem is that there is a huge number of active bands and together (most of all) with venues and promoters looking for the easiest choice to fill up the clubs on one hand and financial difficulties on the other hand, it is difficult to emerge and you have to work a lot on every aspect of the band, from live shows, to the communication, and image, and so on. Surely if you let it all discourage you easily, it gets harder to have a real chance

Avoral2_RingMaster ReviewWhat is on the near horizon for the band?

We are now working on the sequel of WINO, so far we have composed a couple of new songs, focused on heavier and more progressive elements. Soon we will also get back on the stages after a little break, plus some other interesting news we will reveal you at the right time!

Thanks again, any last words you would like to share?

Thanks to you for the room you gave us! We invite you all to have a look at our pages (Facebook, YouTube, Spotify and so on) and give a listen to our music, hoping to find you at some live show for some –always appreciated- good beer all together!

Lastly give the readers, as a music fan rather than a musician, reasons why they should treat themselves to the UMA album.

I really recommend it. Never forget the importance of emergent bands and compilations, you could find one of your future favourite bands! And UMA Compilation is really good.

Horns up!

Read our review of the UMA Compilation @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/06/24/uma-compilation-2015/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 01/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Glamour Assassins – Ain’t So Young

GA_RingMaster Review

The lure starts with a great name and becomes a vibrant persuasion with a debut album that gets feet moving and hips swaying. Glamour Assassins is that first bait, a title reflected perfectly in the melodic beauty and imposing potency cruising their music, and Ain’t So Young the captivating introduction to the Connecticut hailing band. The release offers a host of songs seeded in eighties new wave and synth pop but equally embracing dance punk and an indie rock flavouring. It is an encounter which has at times thick familiarity to it but also a striking freshness which combines for a persistently enjoyable proposition.

Hailing from New Haven, Glamour Assassins consists of Jared Savas, Nick Post, Jose Novo, Carrie Martinelli, and Gil Morrison, a group of musicians with a combined experience of playing with artists such as Dragonette, Matt & Kim, Plushgun, Freezepop, the Postelles, and Greg Hawkes of The Cars under their belts. As Glamour Assassins, they have earned a weighty reputation for an intense live presence which their album is now looking to back up with its theatre of striking songwriting from Savas and a sound which just wants to make you move as it feeds the imagination.

Produced by Joey Mascola and mastered by Grammy-nominated Emily Lazar, Ain’t So Young gets off to a rousing start and never really looks back. The Day Rock & Roll Died is the initial temptation, a song slipping through ears on a single guitar cast melody as keys and atmospheric tempting brews. It is soon into a catchy stroll, wiry hooks and a deep bass line colluding with punchy beats as the track quickly awakens attention and the first breath of involvement by the listener, especially when the vocals bring their strong persuasion to the mix with additional harmonies just as engagingly in tow. The track does not make a seemingly dramatic impact but swiftly the body is lending its moves and feet jabbing the floor as more enterprise blossoms in the increasingly infectious encounter.

cover_RingMaster Review    The rousing swing of the track is replaced by the emotive serenade of Hate Song Part I (Exile), a female delivered vocal caress on the senses awash with evocative keys and a laid back, shadow built bass prowl. It is a slither of a song at a breath over a minute but a transfixing set up for the electronic adventure of Phantom of the Disco. The band’s latest single is a bubble of dance bred electronica and varied impassioned vocals. There is a whisper of OMD to it, as too of Thomas Dolby and Blancmange, but they are mere essences in the thick ambience and emotional shadows fuelling the impressive drama.

Already there is no escaping the diversity to the album and Glamour Assassins’ sound, a quality continuing with the soulful roar of Sex Life. Synths once more envelop ears in a suggestive hue whilst the minimalistic beats and groaning bass lures bring the funk. Vocals and guitars add extra catchy and resourceful enticement in a track which you can easily offer hints of Duran Duran and Tears For Fears too. That recognisable air is in many guises a constant to the band’s sound it is fair to say, and just as honest to admit it only adds to the success and virulence of songs as proven by first the album’s title track and straight after London Fog. The first of the two thrusts indie tenacity and raw sinews into the mix, bouncing along with attitude and feisty energy as crystaline keys court jangly guitars across jabbing rhythms. In contrast its successor sculpts an aural theatre with an epic atmosphere which evolves into a more intimate and sinister proposal over time. Musically it is like eighties era Ultravox meets The Slow Readers Club with another bewitching range of vocals building unique adventure to the narrative. The track is as immersive as its title suggests if not as muggy with keys providing a shining provocative light throughout.

Indie pop ‘n’ roll has voice and limbs heavily involved next through Scumbag, bands like Late Cambrian coming to mind, whilst the contagion soaked Never Get Caught draws from Visage like territory for its pulsating seducing, though to this the band fuels the vocals with a rapacious edge and angst as the guitars spin a riveting web of sonic and melodic imagination which is seemingly Cure inspired. Once more Glamour Assassins turn familiarity into something of their very own though, just with an old friend like nature.

The album closes with Hate Song Part II (Death or Love), a track which kind of sums up the album and the band’s invention in one go. Part rock, part synth pop, and bursting with an array of crafty hooks, alluring grooves, and an infectiousness which never leaves ears and appetite alone, it is an impressive end to a thoroughly enthralling and enjoyable release.

Eighties new wave and synth pop seems to be having a strong influence on numerous emerging bands right now, of which Glamour Assassins is one of the most exciting and potential flooded propositions. Their album…well if you want to dance to some old school but freshly inventive contagion then Ain’t So Young hits the spot.

Ain’t So Young is available now

Pete RingMaster 10/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Parallax Method – The Owl

Pic Ewan Mathers_www.ewanmathersphotographer.com

Pic Ewan Mathers_www.ewanmathersphotographer.com

There are so many things about The Owl EP to wax lyrical over; from its intricate yet free flowing fusion of flavours to its smiling warmth of character even when offering a more volatile twist or passage to contemplate. Most though it is the fact that each of its instrumental adventures provides a brand new escapade with every listen. The music hints, at times openly suggests, but all the time the imagination is given the sonic and melodic palette to paint its own inspired landscape and exploits, and that is pure fun and pleasure.

The release comes courtesy of UK progressive rockers The Parallax Method, their debut introduction to the UK rock scene. Formed last year, the seeds of the band began with guitarist Danny Beardsley, drummer Dave Wright, and bassist Daniel Hayes’ time together in hard rock band Isolysis back in 2011. With a collective experience of almost thirty years, the Derbyshire trio re-united last year as The Parallax Method, drawing on their mutual love of bands such as TesseracT, Karnivool, and Periphery to spice a sound, as mentioned earlier, tagged as progressive rock but entwining the broadest array of styles and essences into a fascinating tapestry. It is all in evidence within their first incitement Owl, the trio conjuring a web of creative intrigue and glorious aural adventure. Since its recording, Hayes has left the band to be replaced by Ben Edis (Spirytus/Breed 77), but left as his legacy a gripping part in a potent start to the bands easy to assume rise to the fore of the progressive scene.

Parallax cdep1._RingMaster Review    To quote their press release, “The Parallax Method leans on the themes of space and a perpetual battle between the owl and the squid to convey their unique sub-genre of modern prog. Space signifies the vast and epic nature of each track. The owl, wise and powerful, manifests itself in the music in its’ confident and strategic build ups. The squid, sneaky and sly, embodies itself in the ever-present surprising twists and turns. And the battle between them often ends in a violent stalemate which serves to betray the band’s humble standard tuning.” That is the premise to and suggestive nature of the release but to be honest as soon as second track Honey I Shrunk The Squid steps forward, after the cosy yet stark intro of the brief Welcome One and Owl, the imagination is off and running with its own narrative too.

Evolving straight out of its predecessor, as all pieces do, the track is soon writhing with juicy grooves and darkly toned rhythms which in turn breed a just as swift virulence in their increasingly inventive enterprise. You can easily confirm the spicery of those previously mentioned influences but also as the track, and indeed EP, develops thoughts are reminded of Belgian solo project Squidhead. The song continues to take ears on a busy and eventful dance, the guitar a jumble of coherent hooks and bewitching melodies framed and punctuated by the almost morose tone of the bass and the swinging beats of Wright. There is an industrial feel to the visual incitement it sparks, an intensive parade of activity and life which is often seduced by shards of melodic beauty and melancholic warmth.

The following Can Mango Take Me Higher is blossomed from those seeds too, exploring them with the sombre yet flirtatious lures of Hayes’ bass and the resourceful craft and imagination of Beardsley’s fingers of guitar strings. As in the previous piece, the music perpetually evolves, at times brewing up tempestuous climates and avenues as potent and captivating as the mellow seductions aligning them. The spatial ambience of the track has thoughts soaring into the dark and dangerous unknown but always there is an earth bound intimacy which also has the imagination and emotions working overtime, the latter especially when the bass throws off its shadows to wonderfully cluck, for want of a better word, at the senses.

Though individual tracks definitely work alone, The Owl should be listened to and is most enjoyed as a whole. Each song is a natural progression and chapter in a singular scintillating tale, whether with the band’s premise or in one’s own thoughts; flowing masterfully from the other as Radagash The Brown does from Can Mango Take Me Higher. The new encounter is a cosmopolitan shuffle which from its jazz kissed and sultry opening scenery travels rugged terrain and gentler seas towards a classical seduction bred on Latin influences and mystique sowing climes. Ultimately the track is a cauldron of technical prowess and even more so mischievous imagination, there no escaping the underlying grin to the release.

Closing on a techno agitation against emotively spun keys, the song flips into Owlgarhythm, the only time you could say the join is less than organic. It matters little as the immediate haze of funk lined agitation and devilry sides with blues electricity, the trio again whipping up a tenaciously sculpted shuffle with a whisper of bedlam to its heart and energy. Continuing to spin a revolving soundscape of sound and descriptive textures which are more travelogue like for the imagination than echoing the conflict maybe suggested by the EP’s theme, the track is superb. As the whole of The Owl, it is a spellbinding creative emprise which you might never get a clear handle on but just devour more greedily with every listen trying.

Another great thing about the EP is that it never has a whiff of indulgence or showing off which can and often does afflict many progressive spawned offerings, meaning that The Parallax Method is definitely a band to pay attention to and The Owl, a release you really should let your imagination play with.

The Owl is released on Friday 11th September through all stores.

Pete RingMaster 10/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Heartbreak Remedy – Midnight Groove

Heartbreak Remedy Promo _RingMaster ReviewShot

Embracing a host of flavoursome flavours in their energy loaded sound, UK quartet Heartbreak Remedy create rock ‘n’ roll which just rolls with the instincts to party. The weight of proof comes in their self-released debut album Midnight Groove, a collection of tracks which may have found variable success with personal tastes at times but all left an appetite for more of their feisty enterprise.

Hailing from Cumbria, Heartbreak Remedy emerged in 2013 with the intent of merging LA’s classic rock sound with seventies bred grooves. The band’s founders, vocalist/bassist Matty Penn and drummer Stephen Jackson soon linked up with guitarists Callum Glynn and Luke Blair, that union the springboard for Heartbreak Remedy and a live presence which began with a debut show at Trillians in Newcastle playing alongside Enuff Z’nuff. 2014 saw the band playing across the UK, their own potent gigs beside support spots with the likes of The Quireboys, The Electric Boys, Kory Clarke/Warrior Soul, The Burning Crows, Bad Touch, Falling Red, and Knock Out Kaine. A full UK tour with The Last Vegas only added to their emerging presence and reputation whilst with two well-received EPs also under their belts, the band more recently has shared stages with Hardcore Superstar, Keri Kelli, and Brad Gillis, and played the Hard Rock Hell Road Trip in Ibiza. Now with its national release, it is the turn of Midnight Groove to awaken new ears.

Heartbreak Remedy seemingly gets referenced to the likes of Mötley Crüe, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and Deep Purple most often, something relatively understandable as the opening track of Midnight Groove erupts in ears. There is certainly something familiar to their sound and seemingly no real intent to be dramatically adventurous but for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll there is little to dismiss the album over or first song Convoy. As soon as a single groove entangles ears attention is awake and seriously intrigued, especially once increasingly anthemic rhythms pave the way for a vocal bellow from Penn and the riff driven stroll it sparks. The beats of Jackson become even crispier bait as the bass of Penn offers a great grumbling lure whilst with acidic hooks and sparkling guitar endeavour wrapped in blues rock hues dancing in ears, the track gets more adventurous and compelling with every passing minute.

Heartbreak Remedy Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review  The following Already Gone is a slightly mellower proposition energy wise and in tone, and maybe because of this lacks the same spark as its predecessor, though the guitars again potently entice with their melodic narrative before Cocked and Loaded from a great devilish bassline emerges as another fiery slice of blues/hard rock. Vocally Penn is a touch wayward at times but equally more expressive as the track dangles spicy grooves and magnetic bait from the bass in ears.

Things really pick up with Tell Me Why, the track a sonic floozy of southern grooves and seventies seeded funk ‘n’ roll. Rhythms add a dark edge to the encounter, the muscular tones of the bass aligning to jabbing swipes from Jackson as the guitars of Glynn and Blair weave a contagious temptation of sultry grooves and riffs. Quickly establishing itself as a major highlight of the album, it seems to ignite something in the release as the following pair of All You’ll Ever Be, with its tangy lining to a nest of writhing grooves, and the pulsating Girl At The Bar keep the new plateau of good times rolling. Both tracks enjoyably explore contrasts and essences of discord, with the latter also slipping into something more eighties glam rock coloured to pleasing effect. The fact that there is a constant raw almost punkish surface and inner flame to the band’s sound only adds to the potency of indeed all three tracks and those to follow.

The skittish beats and southern seducing of Heartbreaker provides feet and imagination with the base for a good time which the southern/seventies hard rock textures of Southside recruit in its own dusty stroll before Rose clams things down with its soothing melodic croon. Guitars cradle ears with their tantalising melodies and evocative reflection whilst Penn almost mesmerises with his emotive croon. The song reveals more of the depth and diversity in the band’s sound, than arguably all the previous songs added together, simultaneously adding another high point to the release.

Next up Perfect Crime reveals more of the punk essence which lies within the band’s sound, fusing it with a dirtier hard rock proposal before its successor Thrill Me. Kill Me musically snarls around more restrained but nicely diverse vocals and Ice Queen sizzles in a bluesy climate, its guitars a sonically bubbling and hazy protagonist around funky rhythms and plainer vocals. It is a slim yet rich fusion of contrasts which works a treat though is over shadowed by the album’s closing triumph it is fair to say.

Like Rose earlier, Far Away is a captivating ballad with Penn really coming into his own as acoustic guitars embrace every syllable and escape of emotion. An increasingly impressive treat, it is a fine end to a rather enjoyable proposition from Heartbreak Remedy. Midnight Groove suggests at times that maybe the band’s sound is more potential than realisation right now, but to that offers the promise and excitement of bigger and bolder things ahead.

Midnight Groove is released on Friday 11th September through all stores.

Pete Ringmaster 10/09/2015

Puppet Rebellion – Life is in your Hands

Puppet Rebellion new pic_RingMaster Review

Another band which hooked us by their name then backed it up with one rousing feast of sound is UK indie rockers Puppet Rebellion. Theirs is a name which incites numerous ideas and hope for their sound but quickly, certainly going by new single Life is in your Hands provides something far more eventful and mouth-watering than mere thought can conjure.

Formed in 2013, Puppet Rebellion is a Manchester quintet which has had seemingly little trouble in luring fiercely loyal fans and broad attention across the varied strains of social media. Two EPs have certainly done them no harm, both Chemical Friends and No Means Yes acclaimed offerings, whilst their live presence in their home city and further afield has earned the band a potent reputation, support slots for the likes of Catfish & The Bottlemen and Reverend and the Makers only adding to their growing stature. Now Life is in your Hands is out there catching appetites with its deceptively anthemic and intensively persuasive hooks; we alone one’s to greedily bite.

A song about “not giving up on something you believe in, even if it’s very hard to do,Life is in Your Hands instantly bathes ears in sultry tendrils of guitars as a throaty bassline with percussive bait tempts. The potency of that lure is immediate and even more forceful as the band’s new vocalist Oliver Davies adds his roaring croon to the ever expanding landscape and heart of the song. The bass of James Halliwell continues to entice across the song with its dark shadows whilst drummer Danny Moss creates a web that is not intimidating but imposingly catchy. It is a stable yet unpredictable core within the thick smog like richness of the melodic enterprise and tenacity blossoming in and escaping the guitars strings of Paul Trochowski and Craig Gibson.

That anthemic essence mentioned runs through every aspect of the track; not a recruitment as open as in other songs but one just as virulent and formidable in its unique union of expressive textures and enthralling flavours. With its creative tempest, quite simply Life is in your Hands gets the listener physically and mentally aroused and breeding a hunger for more.

Looking back at their previous EPs, Life is in your Hands is no one off but definitely the band’s finest moment to date, and very easy to see why they are becoming some of Manchester’s new favourite sons.

Life is in your Hands is out now

Pete RingMaster 10/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Mordecai – Fight Fire With Fire

Mordecai_RingMaster Review

British metallers Mordecai continue to grow and impress as proven by their recently released EP Valour. Now with thick confirmation of the fact and to entice a new horde of eager hungry ears the band release the single Fight Fire With Fire. The opening track to the EP, it is a storming tempest of dark metal and virulent aggression loaded with a passion, and quite simply impossible to ignore.

Hailing from Croydon, the London based quartet of vocalist/guitarist Dan M Hicks, lead guitarist Andy Short, bassist Mickey C, and drummer Alex Gooders has become one of the UK’s brightest hopes over the past couple of years. Formed in 2006, the band was already stirring up some attention but it was with a new settled line-up around 2010 that their Black Stone Cherry, Alter Bridge, and Black Label Society inspired sound seem to come truly alive with enthused reactions in return. Live the band has been a potent force, making successful appearances at the likes of Bloodstock, Bull Dog Bash and Hammerfest, as well as Download where they became one of the very few unsigned bands to be invited to play on consecutive years. Alongside that the band has shared stages with bands such as Black Light Burns, Bam Margera’s FFU, and Fightstar whilst 2013 saw the release of their eagerly anticipated debut album Undaunted, a well-received incitement followed and eclipsed this year by the aforementioned Valour EP. Recorded with John Mitchell (You Me At Six, Architects and Alter Bridge)at Outhouse Studios, it too was an acclaimed and hungrily welcomed proposition unleashing some of the band’s most adventurous and explosive songs to date, one of which being Fight Fire With Fire.

The single song opens on a lusty roar from Hicks, his ravenous tones backed by spicy riffs and hefty rhythms. Soon hitting a meaty stride, the track becomes as predatory as it is sonically invigorating; ears and appetite aflame from its contagious aggression and brawling weave of colourful grooves aligned to vocal calls and rhythmic animosity. With the guitars also spinning a web of sultry melodies and suggestive hues around the swiftly gripping confrontation, the air is ripe with adventure and drama, a rebel rousing incitement coursing through the creative bodies of the band and in turn the listener.

If they are still an unknown, Fight Fire With Fire is the perfect way to introduce yourself to Mordecai. It has all the elements and flavours which makes the band for so many one continually exciting proposal of addictively tempestuous of rock ‘n’ roll.

Fight Fire With Fire is available now

Pete Ringmaster 09/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/