Zedi Forder – Self Titled EP

cover_RingMaster Review

Having a lustful attraction to its member’s other projects, there was always a fair chance that the self-titled debut EP from UK rock band Zedi Forder was going to incite the same kind of appetite but of course you never know. Well actually maybe we do as it seems any project linked to bands such as Tricore, An Entire Legion, and Rind Skank, not forgetting Kerl, the solo project of one of its members, is primed to excite and ignite personal passions and those of a great many others. The four track Zedi Forder introduction is no exception, another bundle of songs which blow ears and emotions away whilst proving once more that some of the most compelling songwriting and sounds in heavy rock/metal are waiting to be discovered in the heart of the British music scene.

Zedi Forder is right now a duo, soon to be trio as they search for a bassist, and consists of Guildford based vocalist/drummer/songwriter Chris Kerley and guitarist Mark Carstairs, men behind the list of exceptional bands mentioned above. Inspirations woven into the band’s sound include the likes of System Of A Down, Led Zeppelin, Korn, Mastodon, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Queen, Incubus, Paradise Lost, Nirvana and many more, but as is soon apparent within the EP, all mere colours in a unique tapestry of imagination, creative mischief, and pure aural majesty which if it reminds off anything it is a little of the duo’s previous adventures.

The EP starts off with Killakarta, a track instantly warming ears with punchy beats and lightly growling grooves. In no time the recognisable tones of Kerley are enticing, his presence as magnetic as ever to match the potency of the sounds around surely one of the best unsung vocalists in British rock as well as songwriters. The track continues to boldly stroll, its calm but open swagger as endearing as the brewing drama of sound fuelling its confidence and sparking the imagination. Warm breezes of melodic seduction blossom in the expectations avoiding craft and emotional theatre of the song though a more predatory and aggressive shade continually lurks in the shadows to resonate with the lyrics. It is a mouth-watering start to the release but just the teaser to greater alchemy.

I’m the one leaps in next with sinews showing and nostrils on the point of being flared but it is a ruse as almost as quickly the track twists on a meaty piece of bass bait into a hip swaying funk kissed swing of melodic and contagious dexterity. Like 12 Stone Toddler meets KingBathmat with a definite and understandably rich vein of An Entire Legion (AEL) to it, especially when it bursts into an energetically and almost dirtily tantalising blaze, the song is just irresistible. Quite simply it is a gorgeous hook laded slab of melodically flirtatious and feistily rousing rock ‘n’ roll, and one of the very best things to come from a Kerley composition/collaboration.

Humour has never been too far from the band’s member’s creativity and is just as potent in Zedi Forder and within the grin sparking Nachoman, a song which is just as provocative in its social commentary as sonic flame of sound. Again we have to offer some similarities to AEL and songs like Scurvy Johnson, but equally it is another song bred with a diversity of flavours and almost whimsical imagination for a smouldering creative charm offensive complete with a rousing snarl and anthemic seduction.

Final song is Time after time, two and a half minutes which really does growl whilst springing a web of riffs and jabbing beats which bleed infectiousness in every grungy enticement and wicked swipe. I guess you could offer the inventive roar and aggressiveness of Tricore as a scent to the closing song, spices which are unavoidable due to the familiar voice and creative flare Kerley and Carstairs, but once more there is plenty of fresh tenacity and ripe originality to sculpt its own identity and bring an outstanding encounter to a rich, thrilling close.

It is fair to say that other bands with Kerley and Carstairs at the heart have criminally gone undervalued bordering on unnoticed by major attention and success. Thankfully making music which leaves a lasting imprint on body and imagination through creative originality and adventure is a passion, a vocation for the pair at the heart of Zedi Forder, so we get to feast on their alchemy once again and so should you, it would be rude not to go off and discover its majesty, wouldn’t it?

The Zedi Forder EP is out now as a name your price download at the Tricore Bandcamp profile.

Pete RingMaster 02/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Poly-Esters – First Cut

The Poly-Esters pic_RingMaster Review

And the excitement builds…alongside thick anticipation for The Poly-Esters and their proposed debut album for 2016. The reason all stems from the band’s freshly unleashed EP First Cut, three tracks of attitude drooling punk rock which just gets under the skin in a relentless incitement of rousingly fiery rock ‘n’ roll. It is a proposition which is potently nostalgic, furiously fresh, and one more defiant slab of loud proof that British punk ‘n’ roll outshines all on its day.

The Poly-Esters is a Blackpool bred force consisting of guitarists/vocalists Lola Fenix and Catlow, bassist/vocalist Syphi Lizz, and drummer Elliska Tron. Formed we believe in 2014, it is fair to say that the quartet has been stirring up an eager fuss for their riot grrrl/grunge punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll as evidenced by their storming performance and subsequent reactions at the Nice N Sleazy Festival and Rebellion this year. Now it is their debut release attempting to do the brewing of hungry attention and already in its few weeks out, First Cut has done a stirring and sterling job.

The Poly-Esters_RingMaster Review     From their first track upon First Cut, The Poly-Esters fall on ears with the belligerent nature of Vice Squad, the ravenous and resourceful tenacity of The Kut, and the off kilter invention of The Raincoats. A strain of familiarity colludes with one of brand new imagination as opener Fooling Noone straight way gets to grips with body and emotions. Instantly riffs and wicked beats are raining down on the senses but tempered by the infectiousness which is just as swiftly fuelling the persuasion. In no time a healthily luring hook is working away in the swing of things too whilst the raw coated and seriously engaging vocals from all three string manipulators are as magnetic as the sounds around them. The track stomps along before suddenly slipping into something unpredictable and transfixing, a great discord kissed shimmer of calm which has a definite spice of The Slits to it. Things are soon feistily rocking again of course, bringing the song to a bruising and boisterous close whilst setting the EP off to a tremendous start.

Things only get better though, second track Cracked wrapping ears in a sonic mist from within which a flirtatious bassline winks and a searing flame of guitar erupts. The beats of Tron leave nothing in the locker as they join the affair but as in the first song, the instinctive catchiness of the band’s sound involves rather than intimidates. It does have an inherent snarl though which escapes through vocals and the rugged seduction on offer, it here aligned to riffs and short grooves which finger the imagination and a rhythmic inducement acting as a protagonist to well flung bodies.

Binge And Purge completes the line-up of thrills and again finds something to just outshine its predecessor. Opening with a rhythmic enticing which is almost duelling with ears as it crawls over their already eager appetite, the track’s predatory start is further enhanced by the acidic caress of the guitars but urged into a more even tempered stroll. That initial stalking of the senses is soon back igniting ears though, bringing an extra tingle of pleasure with it. That earlier reference to The Raincoats is most rowdy here but again The Poly-Esters use the hues to create their own landscape of imagination and thick temptation in on irresistible proposal within another in the shape of one thrilling introduction to the band.

Whenever the band’s first album is out it cannot come quick enough. We often label bands as ones to watch, and always with strong evidence but with The Poly-Esters watching is too late, climbing on board their ascent from the off and feeling their punk ingenuity manipulating body and soul, the only option.

The First Cut EP is out now via the band’s Bandcamp profile.

Pete RingMaster 03/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

In Evil Hour – Built On Our Backs

Photo Helen Templeton Photography.

Photo Helen Templeton Photography.

How do you back up debut album which a great many, us included, called a modern punk classic. Well with another equally blistering triumph of course. Easy on paper and in thought but not so simple in deed but that is exactly what UK punksters In Evil Hour have done with new EP Built On Our Backs. The follow-up to the exhilarating roar that is The World Bleeds Out, their new six-track new fury is a furnace of attitude and defiance loaded with lethal hooks and virulent contagion, all honed to incite and inflame ears and thoughts. To put it simply, it is hardcore punk rock at its ferocious best.

Darlington bred, In Evil Hour formed in the summer of 2011 drawing on inspirations from bands such as AFI, Black Flag, Sick of it All, and the Nerve Agents. Very early on the quartet was becoming a potent presence and draw on the live scene, shows with the likes of Leftover Crack, The Misfits, H20, and The Creepshow earning a quick reputation as one exciting onslaught which was further confirmed by their first EP, the Antipop Records released Tell Your God To Ready For Blood of that first year for the band. The World Bleeds Out really awoke attention and fevered appetites with its unleashing in 2013 on STP Records, its release at that year’s Rebellion one of the highlights of the weekend for band and fans.

With a tour alongside the $wingin’ Utters and their own jaunt into Europe and around the UK this August under their 2015 belts, In Evil Hour have provided another rousing and irresistible storm with Built On Our Backs. As you might suspect it is a collection of socially and politically challenging furies immersed in songs which spit fire and boil infection ripe seduction. The EP opens with Progress, which spins immediate bait of alluring guitar before broadening into a full enticement of spicy riffs, sharp hooks, and pungent rhythms. The persuasion is complete with the recognisable snarl of Alice’s voice, attitude and defiance dripping from every syllable as the track whips up an even keener and catchy aggressive stomp. Fair to say the song does not offer something to majorly blow ears and thoughts away, whilst undeniably heavily pleasing body and appetite, but rather provides the perfect base and launch pad for greater adventure to erupt from, which it certainly does with Blood and Majesty.

cover_RingMaster Review     To be honest the difference to the individual characters of the two tracks is nothing big or particularly definable yet the second song just pushes the right buttons to a more lusty reaction. Its first rumble of riffs and scythe of beats carries a spark suggesting a mighty tempest to come, an explosion of voice, riffs, and barbarous rhythmic enterprise confirming it swiftly after. Melodies and vocals have a toxic edge to them whilst Gareth’s guitar and Gib’s bass just grumble and growl with their particular torrents of caustic endeavour and nature. Throw in scarring swings from drummer Mike and you have one glorious addiction at work.

There is no way anyone could resist getting fully involved with the song, physically and vocally, and the same applies to Ascension. Its first touch is a ‘mellower’ vocal alluring from Alice against a raw riff, though there is that ever present snarl just adding its edge to her tones and being fully exposed across the track as it brews up an intensive and energetic blaze which once fully aflame, provides another surge of irresistibility and senses igniting provocation. That early melodic calmness is never driven away though, seizing the moment in a mouth-watering detour which is just not long enough before the creative raging is back igniting the air.

The bass of Gib leaves a tasty morsel of bait in the third song and again lays down an early bestial lure within the following EP’s title track, an anthem with vocal hooks and temptations galore and antagonistic ingenuity a plenty. It defies the listener not to physically leap on board as it brawls lyrically and musically, a challenge almost as potently thrown out by Bright Lights. At one minute and a large nudge, the track in some ways does not have long enough to establish its own uniquely corruptive web of tempting but still offers a storming slice of creative aggravation and enjoyment to get teeth fully into before Predators brings Built On Our Backs to a might close.

The track is prime In Evil Hour, every existing and newly discovered quality and skill in songwriting and sound within the band uncaged in its melody ripe hardcore and angst driven combat. A battle cry for the twenty first century and daily living, it is superb and the perfect end to an EP emulating its success in a themed journey across the elevation of hope, hard work, and rewards but resulting in exploitation and worse. As ever In Evil Hour play hard, hit hard, and have set free another standard setting fury for modern punk.

Built On Our Backs is available now via most online stores and digitally as well as on CD at the band’s Bandcamp and Bigcartel store respectively.

Pete RingMaster 03/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Harmorage – Psychico Corrosif

JF_016_HARMO_NB_RingMaster Review

Grouchy, irritable, and persistently lighting ears with its dirty metal forged rock ‘n’ roll, Psychico Corrosif is one of those offerings which seems to have no intent to fumble with startling originality but would rather create a brawl from recognised textures and hues to ensure a highly flavoursome and enjoyable time is had. That you certainly get with the second album from French metallers Harmorage. It rumbles and grumbles like a bear with a sore head whilst throwing in plenty of twists and adventurous elements; none dramatically unique but all leaving another strain to the overall pleasure gained from its dirty rock ‘n’ roll.

Harmorage began in 2004, formed by the Lyon hailing Chalon brothers, vocalist Daniel and guitarist Nicolas. 2007 saw the release of their debut album Berserker as well as the addition of bassist Frédérick Fiaschi to the band’s ranks. In between we cannot say what consumed the band’s time but fair to say they have honed their sound and made a heftily persuasive studio return with Psychico Corrosive. Also featuring latest band member Bertrand Minary, the drummer joining Harmorage last year, it is an encounter which seems to grow and become more antagonistic with every listen as nuances and initially hidden depths come out to play, in turn making each involvement with its body increasingly satisfying.

Harmorage - Psychico Corrosif - 2015_RingMaster Review   Psychico Corrosif sonically shudders as it awakens through Reveillons nous!, resonating tremors and a haunting dance of disorientating sounds, didgeridoos included, converging on ears before a metal groove emerges from a clearing and throws its familiar heavy metal hues forward. This seems to spark sinew crafted rhythms and tangy riffs before the grizzly tones of Daniel add their hoarse textures to the incitement. His French sung delivery and imposing riffery carries a touch of Irish band Triggerman which adds great shade to the more classic metal breeding of the grooves and guitar enterprise. With the bass a bestial growl throughout, it is a strong start to Psychico Corrosif emulated and surpassed by its title track. The second track immediately springs a web of psychotic tenacity in imagination and bedlamic sound which is strung together by the rhythmic intent and prowess of Bertrand. There is a sense of System Of A Down to the unpredictability and discord lined stomp, a touch of bands like Arcania and Yugal also toning the tempestuous snarl and fury of the excellent encounter to great effect.

The following Le fer dans la plaie also comes off of an initial predatory bass growl, its alluring bait tempered a little by the melodic acidity which quickly joins the tempting. A quick pick-me-up comes with the bundle of vocal causticity and twisted array of guitar tenacity which blooms throughout though, the latter bursting into a captivating glow of melody rich enterprise across the track before Scarifiés stamps its ruggedly creative resourcefulness on ears and enjoyment and after, the dirty punk ‘n’ roll of Je condamne et j’accuse spews attitude and trashy rock ‘n’ roll to rousing success. In most songs there are skilled slips into contrasting and temporarily wrong-footing exploits which again give something slightly familiar a fresh character and temptation, this pair fine examples and results of that arguably not pushed enough adventure within Psychico Corrosif and indeed Harmorage.

The atmospherically compelling Aurore boréale grips the imagination next, though as within most songs a thrash seeded charge from riffs and rhythms aligns to rapacious grooves cast by guitars and bass to eventually take hold. Simultaneously exploring a progressively honed landscape infused with coarse stoner bred and melodically cultured scenery, the song is a weave of individual textures and fascinating flavours all colluding for another slab of revelry which relentlessly grows in intensity and persuasion.

The rhythmic seducing opening up Images du monde is instant slavery leading to a crotchety roar of attitude and sound, a confrontation unafraid to twist and turn through groove and heavy metal devilry on a fluid whim as it lights a fire in body and passions. The best track on the album it is ablaze with its inventiveness of turning old friends of sound into something aggressively refreshing and creatively unpredictable, as shown by its smouldering oasis of atmospheric peace and melodic serenading just after midway. It is an experiment and boldness the band hints at throughout the album but is finally given its own head here and almost as freely in the closing pair of Mon anarchie and Droit et fier. The penultimate song again makes great use of merging punk and grooved rock spices with metal voracity, the drum skills of Bertrand especially gripping against the sonic squall and Daniel’s earthy rasps. The final track kind of sums up the punk, metal, rock ‘n’ roll union that is the Harmorage sound; a muscular and ratty bellow of belligerence happy to throw the listener off the scent with unexpected drifts into smooth caresses and imaginative detours. Simply growing in strength and persuasion over each and every listen, it is an electric end to a mightily pleasing release.

Psychico Corrosif is raw and at times a touch too familiar with its originality, though not necessarily the storms they brew them up in, but there is no escaping it is also one rip-roaring slab of pushy fun and that definitely works for us.

Psychico Corrosif is available now

Pete RingMaster 03/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Dienamic – Afterlife

Promo Picture Dienamic_RingMaster Review

Norwegian metallers Dienamic offered themselves up as a seriously promising proposition with their debut album Surfing the Apocalypse. Now confirmation has arrived in the rousing shape of Afterlife, an attention grabbing confrontation which still suggests there is more to come from Dienamic and still to be discovered by the band within their creative depths, yet provides one compelling and very often incendiary incitement to leave nothing less than full satisfaction in its wake. The band is still establishing itself in many ways, yet to really step from the crowd, but with Afterlife as evidence is destined to be part of the staple diet of a great horde of metal fans now and ahead.

Formed in 2009 or 10, depending where you look, the Tromsø hailing Dienamic quickly unleashed their thrash fuelled, death lined raw metal via a self-titled EP the same year. That in turn sparked the band’s renowned live assaults and hunger which over the years have seen them tour the likes of Japan, Central and Eastern Europe, and of course their homeland. 2012 saw the release of Surfing the Apocalypse, a swiftly devoured and acclaimed proposal marking the band out as one of the new promise flooded protagonists in the world metal scene. Backed by that live presence, which only helped increase the stature and reputation of the band across 2013 and since, Dienamic has given confirmation of their blossoming sound and impact through Afterlife. With guitarist Eivind Kjær Killie, bassist Kenneth Iversen Muotkajærvi, and drummer Sebastian Jacobsson joining band founders in vocalist Gustav Harry Lindquist and guitarist Stein-Odin Johannessen, a line-up coming together late 2014, and the signing with Italian label Worm Hole Death too, Dienamic is ready to stir up some spotlights and appetites with their new album; something it is already beginning to do with its release a few short weeks back.

cover_RingMaster Review     The Reaping starts Afterlife off, a squeal of riffs the perfect appetiser to the barrage of feisty rhythms and nagging riffs which follow. It is a quickly riveting start which continues to worry and entangle ears in acidic sonic temptation. The grouchy growl of Lindquist is quickly in place to add to the intimidation and lure of the song, his input the trigger for a broadening weave of winy grooves and an addictive torrent of addictive riffs and rhythms. Like a mix of Pantera and Bloodsimple, the song is a masterful and persistently enjoyable start to the album instantly awakening full involvement of ears and appetite which Innocent Gun makes full use of straight after. The second track has a similar basic landscape but in different hues and shades of attitude, musically and vocally. Soon striding with a belligerence to its infectious bait of swinging beats and spicy grooves, the song reveals a whole new character to that of its predecessor whilst being the extension of its creative devilry.

Essences of bands like Testament and Exodus creep into the opening parade of enterprise within the excellent Revolution for Nothing, strains which get repeated throughout in between masterful roars of voice and emotions wrapped in infection soaked, melodic rich exploits. Good unpredictability also enriches the track, not bringing major moments to wrong-foot ears but enough to ensure every twist, each turn in the aggressive flight, is fresh and distinctly inventive, a quality highlighted again within the more primal Where God Feeds. Riffs are carnivorous from its first breath whilst the bass prowls the song with a predatory air as drums sticks swing some shuddering beats. Once more thoughts of bands like Pantera are lured out in the course of the ravaging grooving, as also of others such as Stam1na and Gojira for varying reasons.

The pair of Dance with the Devil and You Still Walk leaves the body breathless and a little greedier for more, the first through its thrash fury bound in anthemic ferocity and rapacious enterprise and the second, if not with quite the same impact, with an evocative storm of more prowling endeavour and skilled craft from each of the band. This is a song which grows and enthrals even more over time whereas others make a more instant impression, like the hellacious and riveting tempest of Generation Reboot. An infestation of rhythmic animosity and grooved seducing that bellows and buffets the senses with raw energy and rabid enterprise, it is easily one of the major highlights of the album.

One of but not THE one, that title falls upon Overthrown and its ordered bedlam of wicked beats, grievous riffery, and emotional intimidation speared by tendrils of sonic imagination. Again it is not easy to say the track is wholly original but all familiarity embraced is twisted into a tapestry of physical discontent and bordering on barbarous seduction as it stirs the passions. Amongst many impressive tracks it is the standout antagonist and more evidence of the quality within and still brewing inside Dienamic.

The album’s title track is breeding similar pleasures next, its fierce opening outpouring evolving into an oasis of melodic metal warmth before erupting into an even more venomous and intoxicating stalking of ears and air. The track is danger and bewitchment rolled into one before the melodic shimmer of The End completes the album. It is a melo-death seeded offering which as elegant and melodically entrancing as it is has a raging fire in its emotional belly, a furnace of angst and intensity which oozes from every pore of the album’s potent finale.

Dienamic are not close to touching their pinnacle yet but in Afterlife show they has all the armoury to become a highly notable presence in world metal and, as here, offer some highly satisfying and very often imposingly thrilling adventures along the way.

Afterlife is available now via Worm Hole Death.

Pete Ringmaster 02/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

MountainJam – EP

MJ_RingMaster Review

UK rockers MountainJam first got in touch with their double A-sided debut single around a month ago, the release just one moment in a busy time since the band emerged in March of this year. Since then the Hinckley based band has released another track, those three subsequently making up part of a self-titled EP released just a matter of days ago. All songs have introduced to ears a band with experience in their blood, craft in their hands, and passion in their hearts, and also some rather juicy songs.

The seeds of MountainJam pretty much began when vocalist/rhythm guitarist Dean Dovey met lead guitarist Andy Varden and bassist Nick Roberts as part of Midlands rock band The Silent Union in late 2013. Early 2015 the trio left that band, linked up with drummer Pez, a long-time friend of Varden and Roberts, and stepped forward as MountainJam. In no time a clutch of demos were written and recorded, with live shows just as rapid a move with their first being at The Soundhouse in Leicester. July saw the Jealous Of Me/Lust single unveiled to eager responses with third track The Lord of My Hours revealed soon after to more positive responses. As August closes its eyes, the band have now released their first EP made up of those three songs and two more quietly but firmly imposing incitements.

cover_RingMaster Review     Musically the band finds hues in the inspirations of bands such as The Who, The Doors, Cream, Small Faces, The Charlatans, and Stone Roses to colour and inflame a sound which has a potent air of nostalgia but equally a real freshness and vitality to its energy and invention. Lust is a perfect example, its romps with ears and appetite with a blend of sixties and nineties guitar rock yet creates a presence which if not quite unique is recognisably individual. Its early caresses of guitar are soon veined by a spicy melodic acidity cast by Varden, this in turn leading to the addition of crisp rhythms and the mellow but fiery tones of Dovey. The stroll of the track is controlled and at times reserved but the sultry lacing of melodies are bewitching and the middle section when its chorus is as inescapable a hook as you could wish, magnetism.

Jealous Of Me has an even stronger feel of sixties/seventies rock, its first breath and spread of riffs carrying hints of bands like Small Faces and occasionally Bad Company. Continuing to swing more rigorous rhythmic hips and flirtatious riffs and grooves, the track has body and appetite fully involved in no time. Again it has a familiarity to it which only works in its favour and a tenacity which just rouses the energies of the listener and a want for more.

The Lord of My Hours is cut from the same feisty cloth, a healthily energetic encounter infusing even richer bluesy spices into its winding grooves, dancing melodies, and engaging vocals. Rhythmically the song is a festival, Pez never quite uncaging a full-on stomp of beats and percussion but providing an addictive shuffle which the thick bass lures of Roberts court with relish and enterprise. The track is irresistible to feet and appetite, rich enjoyment which is found again in the emotively and resourcefully lively Maybe Next Time. One of the other two songs making up the EP, it has a grip which is more of a nineties guitar escapade but again comes thick with essences and textures bred in earlier decades to grab the imagination and further keen involvement.

MountainJam also show they are adept at serenading the senses with the sultry shimmer that is Shadows of your Mind. The guitars glow with melodic, almost surf rock like charm whilst Dovey provides a similarly enticing croon to the gentle canter of a song, whilst the additional keys adding the cream to the flavoursome treat. The influences of psych rock come through vibrantly across the song and though, as the last one mentioned, it fails to quite match up to the success of the other three songs for personal tastes, it leaves a warm glow and oozing satisfaction in its place.

Looking at songs in the order we came across them instead of the track order on the EP, they all unite to provide a very pleasing potential loaded introduction to MountainJam. They are a band hard not to see luring greater spotlights and success upon them as they evolve and simply gets more time and experience under their young belts as a band.

The MountainJam EP is available now at the band’s Bandcamp profile.

Pete Ringmaster 02/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Suffer No Fools – Songs For The Restless Youth

suffer no fools_RingMaster Review

Suffer No Fools is a name you will be getting used to if they fulfil the promise running through debut EP Songs For The Restless Youth. The British metallers are merely months into their emergence after forming earlier this year but offer a sizeable introduction and potential loaded first collection of fiery, groove lined incitements suggesting there is experience in the ranks of their creators. Whether that is so or not, it is a highly accomplished encounter leaving a definite appetite for more from the London based quintet.

Roaring out of Ealing, Suffer No Fools draw on inspirations from the likes of Metallica, Rammstein, Killswitch Engage, and Trivium for their aggressive melody rich sound, influences which do not hide in the shadows within songs but tone rather than direct their direction. As mentioned the band only formed a few months back but have quickly got down to creating strong persuasions as shown in Songs For The Restless Youth. Led by the strong tones of Ali Khan and driven by the rousing rhythms of bassist Alex Bain and drummer Mike Taylor, music and songs take little time in luring ears and attention. Once entwined in the skilled and imaginative enterprise, whether in stirring riffs, imagination inciting grooves, or evocative melodies, of guitarists Jamie Newdeck and Jack Kirby, the EP is a magnetic fire of potential and thick inventive craft. Recently Kirby has left the band to pursue other musical ventures but leaves his potent part in the first steps of a band surely heading to bigger and stronger things.

albumart_RingMaster Review   Opener Acheron is a one minute atmospheric introduction washing the senses in intrigue and sonic radiance; calm before the storm of The Bombing Campaign which is already brewing its potency and tempest in the closing ambience of the first track before striding purposefully into ears with military like rhythms. As riffs and beats welcome the voice of Khan there is no escaping the Metallica spicing, a hue also lining the subsequent melodic and grooved exploits of the song. It is an ear pleasing, emotion stirring encounter, a sturdy anthem to set the EP off properly but one also unafraid to switch into contrasting provocative flavours and textures.

Prey continues the strong start to Songs For The Restless Youth in equally rousing fashion, pushing the accelerator down a touch more and creating an aggressively urgent and compelling proposition at the same time. Again fluidly emerging spicy melodies and vocal harmonies provide a temper to a stormy landscape whilst some of those other inspirations come to mind across the song. Equally though Suffer No Fools, if not dramatically, still offer their own character as shown by the growling Forgiven Or Forgotten. Here guitars further flirt with sonic imagination and ear wrapping grooves but in a climate more hostile and dirty than in its predecessors; its riffs a snarling confrontation and rhythms a fierce barracking. As all tracks and the EP itself, it makes a more than decent first impression but just grows in stature and persuasion over time.

Both the resourceful almost progressive scenery of Abyss and the scorching prowl and anthemic enterprise of Dirge Of The Old Gods make enjoyable times, even if without finding the same heights of those before them and certainly the EP’s best track which brings Songs For The Restless Youth to a mighty close. Into The Breach is the jewel in the crown of the EP, a treat of a song equipped with striking imagination and ear enriching melodic enticement lined with glorious hooks. The song takes a little while to get going but when in full flight and flow, is a riveting beast simultaneously antagonistic and bewitchingly seductive. Alone it makes Suffer No Fools worth keeping an eye on and with its companions in tow encourages thoughts of a band with the tools to make a big impact.

It is probably fair to say that Songs For The Restless Youth has open embers of originality but apart from its final offering, lacks the spark of the unpredictable, to yet truly leap away of the crowd. Suffer No Fools though is a band with individual skills and a united craft that demands attention, rewarding that with a strongly satisfying first look; so again make a note of the name as you enjoy the quality and potential.

Songs For The Restless Youth is available now from the Suffer No Fools Bandcamp.

Pete RingMaster 01/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/