Future Talk – The Path That Sadness Paved

FT_RingMaster Review

Managing to bring potent scents of styles like post hardcore/rock into their familiar yet undeniably fresh and captivating tapestry of alternative rock, UK band Future Talk uncage a powerful introduction to themselves with their The Path That Sadness Paved EP. Seriously engaging on first listen and increasingly compelling with every subsequent involvement in its four emotionally ripe songs, the release offers swift suggestion of a potentially impressive force in the making. The EP does not blaze with striking originality yet again there is the hint that the possibility is also in the breeding as it leaves ears and appetite thoroughly satisfied in the now.

Hailing from Gloucester and emerging in 2014 from the previous projects of its members, Future Talk has been earning a strong reputation for their live presence over the past year which in turn has inspired keen anticipation for their first release. References to bands such as Emarosa, Mallory Knox, and Underoath have been offered against the band’s sound, easy to understand suggestions when listening to The Path That Sadness Paved though in other ways Shattered Skies and Circle of Reason also occasionally nudge thoughts across the quartet of captivating songs.

Cover_RingMaster Review     The Path That Sadness Paved opens with new single/video Sleeping Pills, immediately covering ears in a wave of melodic enticement and sonic coaxing punctuated by firm handed rhythms. The rich tones of vocalist Alex Taylor make an equally potent impact on first impression, flourishing in the embrace of the song’s resourceful drama and imaginative enterprise whilst the track seems to only blossom further with his melodically honed impassioned roars. It is a fiercely magnetic start to the release, as suggested not a song breaking down boundaries but, as the EP, powerfully leaving ears and appetite hungry for more; a success in anyone’s book.

The following Shadow Poet builds from a gentler lure into a tempest of emotion sculpted by great individual craft across the band. The moody bassline nicely contrasts the more fiery elements of the song whilst the vocals add their own catchy nature to a web of jabbing beats, sparkling hooks, and a persistently eventful design in songwriting and sound. Over time, even outshining the excellent opener, the song tells you all you need to know about the invention, potential, and instinctive power of the band and their rousing music.

The Cliffs As A Reminder reveals another fluid and involved weave of guitar and key, it wrapping rolling rhythms in a tantalising blend which is only enhanced by the ever robustly flamed vocals and their lyrical and emotional theatre. Equipped with a dark almost cantankerous tone through the bass, the track ignites ears full pleasure before making way for the closing elegance and emotional croon of Fear Life. Without quite matching the heights of the first trio of songs, it alternately bellows and hauntingly smoulders with open craft and enthralling endeavour to still leave EP and ears on a notable high.

As mentioned Future Talk are not at a point where their distinct identity shines through their already impressing creativity and exciting sound but guitarists Jay McQuilkin and Jack Cadenhead, drummer Max Elderfield, bassist Mitch Potts, and Taylor seem on course to find that uniqueness at some point, whilst providing as here rather enjoyable times along the way.

The Path That Sadness Paved EP is available from August 24th digitally and on CD.

RingMaster 24/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright



Categories: EP, Music

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: