Welcome The Howling Tones – Green & Blues

Welcome The Howling Tones_RingMaster Review

Around two years ago, UK rockers Welcome The Howling Tones offered a thrilling introduction with their first release, a two track single that suggested it was merely the “appetiser for greater incendiary things to come”. It has been a fair time coming but now the Farnborough quartet are poised to release their debut album Green & Blues, and prove all hints and subsequent expectations from that point were right on the money. The eleven track stomp of spicy rock ‘n’ roll is a blaze of that early potential woven into even more crucial and exhilarating blues/stoner bred exploits. Imaginative and impassioned, it is a fiery party for the senses and rebellion for the feet, and proof that Welcome The Howling Tones is indeed an incitement fit to majorly arouse British rock ‘n’ roll.

Welcome The Howling Tones cover_RingMaster ReviewFormed in 2012, the foursome of guitarists Pauly T and Chris Gilday, drummer Lawrence Arnold, and vocalist/bassist Iain Turner quickly drew strong local attention with their tenacious classic rock bred sound infused with flavoursome strains of blues and alternative rock alongside funk infested grooves and more aggressive textures, a blend impressively fuelling the thick persuasion of Green & Blues. Soon spreading their reputation and music further afield, the band released that earlier mentioned double A-sided pairing of Eyes to Hypnotise and Broken Man, earning broader and acclaiming attention in return whilst live they proceeded over time to shared stages with the likes of Godsized, The Jamie Lenman Band, Nick Oliveri, The Icarus Line, Breed 77 and many more, again to regular high praise.

Green & Blues looks to stir up ears and emotions from the off, taking little time to leap into its feistiest persuasion with opener Deep River Blues. From its first breath the guitars are spinning a tasty web of grooves, their strong coaxing aided by the just as potent and impressing vocal tones of Turner. As it slowly broadens its shoulders and expands its landscape, the song is still teasing with its early enticement, its slim but thickly tempting invitation helping to restrain excess energy even as rhythms and a cloudy atmosphere joins the revelry. Classically toned and spiced with a delta blues hue which only intensifies as the song’s drama brews, the thrilling encounter leaves on a rousing finale of stoner sculpted flames, meaty rhythms, and acidic grooving.

It is a mighty start to the album but quickly eclipsed by both Eyes to Hypnotise and Broken Man. The first of the pair virtually drizzles its initial guitar lure over ears, swiftly awakening attention and appetite in turn. It is a gripping start quickly tightening with the addition of a throaty growl from Turner’s bass and the heady swipes of Arnold’s beats, which subsequently become a mosaic of creative animation as the song grows. The grooves and riffs spilling from the fingers and strings of Pauly T and Gilday are toxic in their addictive nature and tempting, inflaming further a track which in a matter of seconds is as irresistible as it is voraciously creative. The instrumental swagger of the song alone enslaves and with the expressive tones of Turner’s voice powerfully riding their compelling enterprise, it leaves a licking of lips and hunger for more which is easily satisfied by its successor, which also from its first moments has ears and pleasure in a spin. From the first clicking of drum sticks to the tangy grooves, sandy vocals to pulsating beats, the encounter is an inescapable trap which welcomingly imposes further with a siren-esque lure of spice fuelled melodies and stoner grooves. With thrilling spurts of discord and noise seeded imagination for good measure, the rousing stomp is the kind of thing lust was invented for.

     There is no let-up of quality and success with Never Said Forever and its drama spilling alternative rock resourcefulness. Amongst many traits which stand out in the band’s sound and songwriting, unpredictability is a potent asset and in full bloom here as the track twists and turns rhythmically and sonically, every move lined with bold adventure and mouth-watering imagination. Carrying a delicious solo for extra flavour, the album’s pinnacle is set down, though rivalled throughout with Burn my Bones a swift contender next. A blues shuffle emerges with Arnold again creating a commanding frame within which a great vocal mix and the most citric flavoured sonic exploit yet on the release plays. It is an enthralling hex swinging and growling with a vintage toning courting modern dark rock prowess.

Honey I Want You NOT Your Money keeps things rocking like a dog in heat, its raucous energy and melodic flames as bracing and incendiary as standing in a lightning storm on a cliff top whilst Fresh Flesh straight after explores a sultry embrace with prowling riffs and thumping rhythms bound in evocative vocals and great sonic tartness. It does not quite have the bite of previous songs but still leaves thoughts and emotions alive especially with its increasingly volatile assets.

The southern rock brewed Dip Me in Mud is another which initially seems to lack the heat of other encounters within the album but over time emerges as a need to return to as often as possible tempting of craft and passion. It is a potency applying to the whole of Green & Blues to be honest and certainly She’s My Kind of Woman with its sweltering climate of blues expression woven in to a nest of grooves recalling the charm of the sixties, mischief of the seventies, and the snarl of the now.

Though not a hell for leather assault on the senses, Green & Blues is a highly charged encounter which never gives the body a rest, its rowdy bouts of balls swinging rock ‘n’ roll through to steamier strolls all providing a constant adrenaline shock to the system. Green God Envy is one of the saltier seductions, it’s swaying body and humid nature temptress like, and just as persuasive and intensive as such a siren before making way for the closing I Can Go Bad. As hoped and expected, the song is a stonking rocker of a proposal to end things up but also as should be assumed, loaded with alternative rock imagination and sparkling creative diversity.

The first Welcome The Howling Tones encounter certainly suggested the band was capable of something as glorious and exciting as Green & Blues but over two years you never know. Well now we do and with one of the most enjoyable propositions anywhere this year, the band confirms themselves as potentially another of those destined to pungently shape the future of the UK rock scene.

Green & Blues is available from on 13th July @ http://welcomethehowlingtones.bandcamp.com/

http://www.welcomethehowlingtones.com/   https://www.facebook.com/WelcometheHowlingTones

RingMaster 08/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

On Top – Topless

On Top_RingMaster Review

There is something about US rockers On Top and their rousing sound which just gets the energies boiling and body submitting to its anthemic roar. The Philadelphia trio do not bring anything outside of the box with their old school but fresh mix of heavy metal and hard rock, familiarity as potent an ingredient as adrenaline and passion, yet as with previous releases and especially the 2014 Top to Bottom EP, they just hit the right spot to incite thorough enjoyment. New release Topless sees them doing it once again with four tracks that simply riot in ears for an invigorating and fun time for all.

Consisting of band founder and vocalist/bassist Jaron Gulino, guitarist/backing vocalist Brian Davis, and drummer/ backing vocalist Danny Piselli, On Top once more stir up air and attention with their Chris Collier (KXM, Lynch Mob) mixed and mastered EP. Opener Lie to Me is an immediate involvement luring ears with an initial spicy groove swiftly joined by a throaty bassline, crisp beats, and the ever enticing tones of Gulino. The right shade of dirty with glam and blues rock colouring to its tenacious stride and persuasion, the track is the contagion we expect, carrying on where the Top to Bottom EP left off whilst offering a more rounded and skilfully woven bellow of sound.

On Top cover_RingMaster Review     A meatier tone and blues spawned tang soaks the following Crazy, the track instantly showing an imposing side to the On Top songwriting and sound, a predation led by the excellent snarl of Gulino’s bass. As its predecessor, there is still an easy infectiousness at work which proves impossible to resist but where the track really excels is in the raw almost psychotic shadows masked as rhythms and the increasingly virulent adventure spun by Davis’ nimble fingers upon strings.

Closing on an enslaving roar, the song makes way for the fiery tempest of 282 and a slab of the filthiest, attitude fuelled brawl of rock ‘n’ roll to come from the band to date. Bred with punk belligerence and aggression whilst evolving a fascinating tapestry of blues and melodic rock resourcefulness, the track virtually stalks ears and emotions as it pushes itself as the pinnacle of the release. It might be the dirtiest, antagonistic incitement from On Top so far in their career but it is also the best.

The EP closes with Got Me Runnin’ and another dynamic saunter of rich hooks and spicy grooves aligned to dark grouchy rhythms and vocal attitude. Arguably the most adventurous song on Topless with its melodic imagination in flirtation with progressive hues, it is still no slouch on infectious bait and dynamic endeavour.

Fair to say On Top provides something familiar and easily accessible with Topless. It will feed their fans expectations to fine effect whilst recruiting many more new appetites too. The band offers honest rock ‘n’ roll there to have a good time, which quite simply ensures the listener does too.

Topless is available from July 9th via Toil Records @ http://www.toilinc.com/#!music/c1x9v

https://www.facebook.com/ontoprocks

RingMaster 08/07/201

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

BLiNDNESS – Wrapped In Plastic

BLiNDNESS2015_RingMaster Review

It may have been a long time coming but the debut album from BLiNDNESS makes time immaterial as it sizzles on the senses from start to finish spreading a dark wave electro pop seduction which is just as likely to snarl and explode with attitude as it is to smoulder and caress. Wrapped In Plastic is a sonically and imaginatively charged incitement, an adrenaline driven helter-skelter of sound and energy that ears and thoughts quickly bask in. The accompanying press release to the album calls it a “rollercoaster ride of beautiful chaos” and that about says it all.

Formed in 2008, BLiNDNESS consists of Beth Rettig (vocals, programming, noise), Emma Quick (bass, noise), and Debbie Smith (guitar, feedback, noise) previously of Curve, Echobelly, and Snowpony. Since emerging the London based band has persistently been an explosive proposition on the Capital’s live scene and beyond. Now it is the turn of Wrapped In Plastic to set the fuse to fresh and major attention, and from its opening proposal it easily leaves ears and appetite seriously engaged.

Serves Me Right is the first protagonist and from an opening sonic lure which has the senses flinching whilst anticipation licks its lips, begins a perpetual transfixing swiftly enhanced by a grizzly bassline. With pulsating electro beats and a scuzzy air to the guitars lining up soon after, the song resonates and enthrals as it broadens its landscape, the warm but steely vocal tones of Rettig riding its thick melodic mesh of sound and intensity to further stretch the captivating start.

Blindness-Wrapped-_RingMaster Review   The guitar sculpted Deserving keeps the strong potency going with immediate effect next, fiery flames from the strings of Smith igniting the air as the dark tones of bass and gripping tones of Rettig bring contrast and balance. Pungent beats spark a meaty stride to the slice of fuzzy rock ‘n’ roll, the song emerging like a mix of Garbage and Breeders dug for extra spicing into the originality of BLiNDNESS. Contagious and bracing, the track pushes the album up another gear to a stirring level matched as magnetically and forcibly by Last One Dies. Tenaciously simmering with electronic imagination and brewing a sturdy and bewitching tapestry of melodic and psych rock, the third song simply rumbles and flirts with increasing energy across its vibrant body.

A gentler croon emerges with No One Counts, though as all tracks there is a volatile edge to sound and invention which means unpredictability is as ripe as melodic and fuzz soaked enterprise. The bass of Quick once more adds a delicious shadow rich twang to proceedings whilst melodically and in creative crescendos there is an air of Muse to the fiery encounter, though just one whisper in a few to something ultimately individual to the band.

Both Sunday Morning and Humming Song wrap ears to pleasing effect, the first vocally and melodically with a mellow tone and reflective shimmer. Its rhythmic shuffle adds a kinetic energy and catchiness to its mesmeric busyness whilst its successor initially slips into an even slower and elegant serenade, swimming over the senses and around evocative rhythms, before brewing a dramatic blaze of sonic and emotive intensity then repeating the cycle once again. The theatre and vocal drama of the song is bewitching, and though neither inflames the passions as powerfully as those before them, each leaves a want for more.

It is a hunger quickly fed by the dark textures and atmosphere of Broken. There is an open shoegaze glow to certainly vocal delivery and melodies throughout the album but probably at its most vivacious here, though that is beautifully tempered by the underlying growl of bass and character of the track, and indeed its almost acrid swamp of sonic imagination and ferocity. Hypnotic until its final parting breath, the track is a meditative, almost carnal incitement.

All In One raises the temperature of the album next, its physical presence as mercurial as its invention. BLiNDNESS entangles seventies psychedelic rock and nineties alternative/ electro rock into its resourceful scorching fire, feedback and celestial acidity as always an ever potent presence. The track ignites ears with ease before Confessions ensures a blistering close to the album with its bluesy inferno of intoxicating rock ‘n’ roll. It is an intense and thrilling end to Wrapped In Plastic, a release finishing on a high and sparking the want to go again.

To be particularly picky there is a similarity in certain areas of some songs which threatens to smother the invention and creative adventure specific to each track but close and constant attention covers that, Wrapped In Plastic a release you need to spend time with to reap all its strengths and qualities. BLiNDNESS definitely rewards such focus though with an encounter which leaves ears ringing, bodies sweaty, and satisfaction bloated.

Wrapped In Plastic is available now via Saint Marie Records @ http://saintmarierecords.limitedrun.com/products/553220-blindness-wrapped-in-plastic

http://www.weareblindness.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/weareblindness

RingMaster 08/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net