Tvivler – Negativ Psykologi #1

photo by Mads Ogstrup Nielsen

photo by Mads Ogstrup Nielsen

A rousing of the passions like no other; that is probably the best description of the effect the debut EP from Danish noise punks Tvivler had on our tender ears. Bristling with four tracks of something between post hardcore, noise rock, and sonic ferocity, Negativ Psykologi #1 is a blistering trespass of rabid virulence, an addiction in the making for fans of anyone from At The Drive-In and KEN mode to Kabul Golf Club and Coilguns. Band and release has a sound and presence though which is equally unique from those suggestions, a personality and freshness of its own which translates as one of the most exciting debuts in recent times.

Formed last year, Tvivler (Danish for doubter) hails from Copenhagen and comprises the united talent from numerous other Scandinavian bands. Vocalist Thomas Burø is a member of Lack whilst bassist Morten Ogstrup Nielsen is part of instrumental progressive metallers Town Portal. Completing the line is guitarist Thomas Feltheim from Obstacles and drummer Morten Clausen, the pair also part of hardcore band Children Of Fall. The quartet bring an eclectic mix of styles from their other projects into Tvivler but yet again the band emerges with something wholly distinct from those spices and other propositions breeding a similar assault of sound.

front coverReputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The first instalment in a 7″ trilogy, Negativ Psykologi #1 simply explodes in ears with the first breath of opener Almanak, guitars spreading a sonic rub quickly joined by raw and catchy riffs amidst scything rhythms as well as the scorching tones of Burø. There is an immediate contagion to the encounter, hooks and grooves uniting in a web of irresistible sonic flirtation whilst vocals squall with a just as gripping persuasion. UK band The Gaa Gaas spring to mind at times as the tones of Burø climb over the wiry strands of guitar, his magnetic pull the perfect temper to the carnivorous enticing from the throat of the bass and the emerging dance of surf and post punk imagination.

At two minutes it is far too short but in its brief presence an inescapable slavery of ears and emotions making it easy for the following Tænder to turn up the heat and passions. It too has no interest in offering a gentle entrance, bundling itself through ears in a ball of antagonistic bass and jangly guitar temptation courted by Clausen’s concussive beats. It is a thick assault of busy sound but with a clear centre from which Burø unveils the narrative with acidic prowess. Living up to its title, the song switches around with striking invention and rhythmic agitation, guitars and drum sticks a maelstrom of unpredictability to which the bass provides its own twisted grudge. With a whiff of bands like The Mai Shi to it, the tempest is an anthem to the primal and disorientated amongst us and quite scintillating.

Træfælder opens on a portentous ambience wrapping church bells, but an atmosphere taking less than a second to become a cauldron of unsettling suggestiveness leading to a furnace of guitar causticity and raw vocal bewitchment. As imposing and abrasive as the delivery of Burø and in turn the backing of the band are, they expel a ringing harmonious lure which is as seductive and disturbing as the kaleidoscope of psyche sucking adventure around them. The song’s title means traps and there is indeed no escaping the addictive hold of the song, another living up to its name and keeping ears with a greedy appetite chained.

The EP finishes with Tyndhudet, the harshest, most disorientating fury on the release. Each track within Negativ Psykologi #1 gets progressively rawer and violent, the closer bringing the release to a hellacious and abrasing finale. It is not all raw confrontation though, Tvivler again spinning a weave of infectious hooks and addictive grooves which just light body and imagination. Drums and bass are bestial it is fair to say against that alluring tempting but even they have moments where lust gets the best of them and they ease off a whisper to add fresh flirtation.

The track is a glorious end to a stunning encounter. Tvivler and their sound is not going to be for everyone of course but if those hints earlier get the juices bubbling and indeed post and neat hardcore as well as noise and punk rock too, then Negativ Psykologi #1 is going to bring some ecstasy to your lives.

Negativ Psykologi #1 is out now @ http://tvivler.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/tvivler

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Carnivora – The Vision EP

mkramer_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Boston metallers Carnivora first caught our attention with an appearance on the excellent Bluntface Records compilation Operation: Underground. It featured a track from the band’s debut album Eternal, which after investigation turned out to equally be a stirring and attention exciting proposal. Now the band returns with the vicious exploits and temptations of The Vision EP, a ravenous and thrilling declaration of all the band’s skills and even bolder creative enmity.

Everything about The Vision is a step up from their impressive and acclaimed 2013 debut, the EP’s four tracks a cauldron of fierce imagination and volatile invention cast in maelstroms of diversely sculpted extreme metal. Groove and melodic metal enterprise colludes with death and thrash animosity in slabs of unpredictable and brutally irritable incitements, but furies ripe with captivating sonic adventure and melodic expression. Its release follows a successful couple of years which saw the band tearing up festivals such as the New England Metal & Hardcore Festival, Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival, The Summer Slaughter Tour, and Rock And Shock Festival, all last year, with their merciless sound and share stages with the likes of Cannibal Corpse, Behemoth, Overkill, Trivium, Job For A Cowboy, Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Shadows Fall, and many more. The Vision is Carnivora now snarling viciously at broader and more intensive spotlights and a global awakening to their presence sure to be on the cards such the EP’s dramatic persuasion.

CARNIVORA_VisionCover_jpegReputation Radio/RingMaster Review     It opens with A Vision In Red, a song venomously driving through ears straight away, swiftly getting under the skin and invading into the psyche. Riffs and grooves from Cody Michaud and Mike Meehan swarm maliciously over the senses, their addictive presence and prowess addictive bait to which the raw vocal squalls of M. Scott Lentine unleash a diversely delivered and magnetic hostility. It is a gripping proposition, the barbarous swings of drummer Dan DeLucia and serpentine tones cast by the bass of Cam Hunt, an addictive spine around which the guitars blossom and expand rich acidic textures bred in sonic imagination. As unpredictable as it is fascinatingly virulent, increasing in both the further it evolves its creative landscape, the song provides a tremendous start to the release.

Its success is quickly matched by Pessimist’s Tongue, its opening suggestive ambience subsequently whipped up into a tempestuous climate of blistering and rancorous intensity. The guitars lay out a melodic invitation even in the stormy climate of the song, a beckoning impossible to resist despite rhythms hailing down on them and the senses. The vocals, singularly and as the band, soon bring another shade to the encounter, offering a cancerous trespass and rally cry for thoughts and emotions. The song is a glorious violation with underlying temptations such as an understated but seductive lure of keys, solidly backed by Razors & Rust. Arguably more restrained than its predecessors, well slightly more merciful, the track stands toe to toe with the listener raging vocally and emotionally whilst guitars again entangle their enterprise around body and imagination. It does not quite have the spark of the first two tracks but easily entices ears and thoughts into exploring its rich depths and textures to a success similar to that found by those before it.

With a thrilling end to its creative ire, the track departs for EP closer The Reek Of Defeat to provide a final bracing and abrasive ravishing. It carries an almost mischievous flirtation to its melodic design and adventurous gait yet there is little about the song which not predatory or fuelled by bad blood. Its consuming maliciousness leaves ears ringing and emotions high and enjoyably completes a thrilling onslaught of a release.

Carnivora has climbed to new plateaus with The Vision EP yet you can only feel it is just the start of new and greater creative grudges, which in turn is a thought and anticipation to savour.

The Vision EP is available from 23rd June via Manshark Entertainment @ http://carnivora.bandcamp.com/ and http://carnivora.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/carnivoramass   http://www.twitter.com/carnivoramass

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Biotoxic Warfare – Lobotomized

Biotoxic Warfare PIC_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It would probably not be too unfair to say that Lobotomized is not overloaded with rich originality, though it has plenty of flavoursome exploits which stand out, but when it rocks like a barbarian smelling blood, which is most of the time, the debut album from Greek thrashers Biotoxic Warfare is one fiercely enjoyable and invigorating incitement. Wearing many of their inspirations on their sleeve, Slayer and Kreator more obvious ones, Biotoxic Warfare create the kind of hostility their name hints at but also weave in some juicy sonic imagination and temptation to ensure that every song within their first album offers unpredictability as well as spicy familiarity. The result is a compelling and thoroughly pleasing rampage to heartily recommend.

Hailing from Heraklion in Crete, Biotoxic Warfare began in 2012, drawing on the European and American thrash metal scene as well as the roots of the genre to create and hone their own ideation and sound. Making a potent impression on the Crete and Athens live scene soon after, the band released the Baptized In Blood And Greed EP in the April of 2013, its fury earning good reviews around the metal media. Live the band equally flourished, earning a potent reputation as they proceeded to support bands such as Suicidal Angels and Enforcer. 2014 saw the current line-up of vocalist Mike Kavalos, lead guitarist George Dimitrakakis, rhythm guitarist Stelios Sfendilakis, bassist Panagiotis Polioudakis, and drummer Orestis Drapaniotis in place and the recording of the band’s Vaggelis Theodorakis (Revolted Masses) mixed and mastered debut album.

Lobotomized Cover Art_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    Lobotomized quickly works on ears and imagination with its opening instrumental Mors Indecepta. The piece is a swift scene setter, its prowling almost lumbering body dragging portentous hues around as rhythms crawl slowly and intimidatingly through ears. At the same time guitars spin an evocative web of sonic expression until it all comes to a point where it all erupts into a predatory incitement of ears and imagination. The track does not make an instant dramatic persuasion, even as it increases its weight and intensity minute by minute, but over listens becomes a rich and potent introduction. Its transition into Proclaim The Gospel Of Lies is not as fluid as one would wish but quickly forgotten as the second track from a demonic declaration, sends forth riffs and rhythms clad with brutal rabidity, though they quickly become entangled with highly alluring grooves. The track is soon really storming the barricades, its riffs almost punk like and its slithers of grooves pure tangy acidity around the caustic growling of Kavalos. There is familiarity to its hooks and driving riffery yet not of sources or styles expected which adds to the intrigue and fun, as does the slip into dark cavernous, almost doomy terrain.

The song is sheer anthemic magnetism but equipped with expectations throwing exploits and imagination that makes song and band something fresh, a characteristic exploited again in Baptized In Blood And Greed. Again a bestial prowl is the springboard to furious and anthemic tenacity from all areas of the band, the bass a primal invitation as thick and potent as the fiery endeavour of the guitars. Another inescapably rousing conflict, the song makes way for the darker saunter of Dsyphoric Reality. Well its entrance is a deliberate stroll; the rest of its torrential offering is soon after an unbridled and carnivorous trespass of ears and pleasure. As in most songs, an ever twisting gait breeds a compelling and contagious swagger around which the craft of both guitarists shine with their individual creative flaming, the bass on its own agenda to prey on the passions with a rabid snarl and addictive rancor.

Drapaniotis is a perpetual magnet and provocateur with his inventive and constantly evolving swings, as proven once again in the album’s title track, though he has to hold back whilst the song makes a mouth-watering and melodically charming entrance. The itch to uncage energy and antagonism is soon inescapable and drummer, band, and song are soon descending on ears and appetite with a tempest of rabid rhythms and ravenous riffs guided by the ever raw and enjoyable hostility of Kavalos, potently backed vocally by Dimitrakakis. It is the rolling contagion and spicy slithers of sonic invention which steal the show though with the virulence of the song pure slavery as too, as indeed the ingenuity of the guitars in setting off kilter almost post-punk like sparks to the outstanding encounter.

The gripping savagery of Lust For Hate is next, bringing more of the similarity between the surface actions of some songs within Lobotomized but quickly spearing and defusing it with its own imaginative and searing tapestry of sonic colour. Not quite matching previous songs, it leaves ears and satisfaction enjoyably full before Parasitic Life and finally As We Rot (Promises of Heaven) bring the album to a thunderous close. The first of the pair is waspish in its grooving, a tasty and welcome irritant leading into the warfare of the song and returning with regular invention and success whilst the track breeds even broader rhythmic and infectious shoulders for the guitars to blaze from. It is a scintillating proposal matched by its successor, the album closer a tsunami of intensity and barbarism within a whirlpool of unforgiving energy and twisting enterprise, and quite irresistible.

As suggested there is plenty to find yourself familiar with in Lobotomized but it does not stop the album throwing up one of the most invigorating and enjoyable metal releases this year. Biotoxic Warfare is thrash metal embracing the old and new whilst infusing its own spice of character and imagination. This might not rank as your best metal album of 2015 but it just could be your favourite thrash encounter.

Lobotomized is available now via Slaney Records and @ https://biotoxicwarfare.bandcamp.com/album/lobotomized

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Biotoxic-Warfare/427903787269059 https://twitter.com/biotoxicwarfare

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Versus The World – Homesick Roadsick

LORES Versus The World _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

If you are already a fan of US punk rockers Versus The World, new album Homesick Roadsick probably holds few major surprises and if a newcomer to the band, it will be found to healthily recall the pop punk exploits cultured and famed within California over past decades,. For all though, it will be a thoroughly magnetic proposition containing the most rounded and mature songs from the band yet. The release rumbles and strolls along with open contagion and undiluted passion to whip up attention and rich satisfaction, and though it might not prove to be the best punk release this year, it certainly reveals itself as one of the most enjoyable and memorable.

The third album from the Santa Barbara quintet sees the band returning to Kung Fu Records, the home of their self-titled debut full-length of 2004. As its predecessors, Homesick Roadsick was recorded with Bad Astronaut guitarist and producer Thom Flowers and as last album Drink.Sing.Live.Love in 2012, mixed by Ian MacGregor (Katy Perry, All-American Rejects). Fair to say that Versus The World has boldly and inventively grown in presence and songwriting since those early days, honing a vivacious sound setting them apart from the pop punk crowd, even with its recognisable inspirations. Now the line-up of band founders, vocalist/guitarist Donald Spence, bassist Mike Davenport (ex- The Ataris), guitarists Chris Flippin (Lagwagon) and Tony Caraffa (Murderland), and drummer Bryan Charlson have explored new depths and potency to it with Homesick Roadsick and conjured up another treat

It opens with The Santa Margarita, a song written by Spence for Tony Sly, the late frontman for No Use For A Name. Featuring guest Dave Hause, the track quickly has ears in a fiery embrace of raw riffs and sonic tempting driven by the forceful beats of Charlson. Hooks, musically and vocally, stir ears and attention, the song swinging along with an infectious manner and an incendiary energy in its builds to and eruptions of mini crescendos. The song is rich captivation, a rousing start continued by the less urgent but swiftly as flavoursome stirring of The Black Ocean. Heavy scythes of riffs pounce on the senses first, their inviting bait bound in tangy tendrils of guitar as the impressive tones and delivery of Spence croon with expressive passion. More a smoulder than the kind of roar expressed by the previous song, it rises to breach the same creative and gripping plateau before A Storm Like Me unveils its controlled but rousing anthem. Its chorus is an inescapable lure soon involving the listener whilst the guitars, as the vocals across the band, whips up the imagination and appetite with ease.

HSxRS_Vinyl_Front_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Seven Thirty One bounds in expelling emotive flames and tenacious exploits like a mix of The Ataris and Billy Talent next. It quickly sets another peak in the landscape of Homesick Roadsick, the bass of Davenport a dark seduction speared by the volatile swings of Charlson as the guitars of Flippin and Caraffa ooze spicy enticement and fiery persuasion. Further fuelled by the excellent vocal delivery of Spence, the track is raw flirtation followed by both the inventive A Brooklyn Rooftop and the addictive qualities of A Sight For Sore Eyes. Neither song can quite match up to their predecessor but each grips ears and enthrals attention with their dramatic and skilled propositions, especially the latter with its initial and lingering Ruts like jagged riff. It also has one delicious shadow rich bassline amidst a web of melodic and harmonic drama, a combination as fascinating as the songwriting bearing them.

The album’s title track is an initially headstrong rampage setting emotions and appetite aflame, and even though it dips slightly once evening out its attack as melodies and vocals emerge to climb all over ears, it remains a raucously emotive and physical tempest leaving pleasure full and greedy for the just as sizeable and persuasive presence of Bullet Train. Expectations are fed a little by the structure and invention of the track, but with another grouchily incendiary bassline, swirling guitar enterprise, and a vocal resourcefulness which only wins plaudits, the song makes a highly satisfying proposal before being overshadowed by the excellent Detox Retox. Davenport’s bass is carnivorous in tone, his adventurous and thrilling designs increasingly open and potent in the second half of the album, whilst guitars spiral from ravenous riffs into fiery entrails of sonic imagination driven by the energetic whipping of beats. It results in, as the album, an encounter which does not shake the boundaries of punk and maybe the band’s existing originality but leaves the listener encased in fresh enterprise

There is no lessening of enjoyment in the closing pair of songs either, Self Preservation Is Killing Us All first to flame with sonic and melodic dexterity before Our Song offers one final thick bellow of rock ‘n’ roll. They ensure a fine end to another invigorating offering from Versus The World. Homesick Roadsick is undoubtedly the band at its best, though there are times across the album where it seems to hold check on invention heading towards new and potentially startling doorways. It is an album to constantly please and enjoy nevertheless, and a highly pleasing success in anyone’s book.

Homesick Roadsick is available from June 23rd via Kung Fu Records digitally and on Vinyl/CD @ https://versustheworld.bandcamp.com/album/homesick-roadsick

Versus The World Summer UK/EU Tour Dates w/ Strung Out:

30.06.15 DE Berlin – Cassiopeia

01.07.15 DE Cottbus – Gladhouse

02.07.15 DE Erfurt – Eburg

03.07.15 CZ Mighty Sounds Festival

04.07.15 DE Aachen – Musikbunker

05.07.15 FR Paris – Le Petit Bain

06.07.15 UK London – Underworld

07.07.15 UK Manchester – Ruby Lounge

10.07.15 UK Brighton – The Haunt

11.07.15 BE Ostend – Elysee

12.07.15 DE Saarbrucken – Garage

14.07.15 IT Milan – Circolo Magnolia

15.07.15 CH Geneva – Usine

+ More TBA Soon!

http://www.versustheworld.com/   https://www.facebook.com/vstheworldmusic

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net