All Tomorrows – Sol Agnates

All Tomorrows_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

With the release of their second album Sol Agnates, Chilean metallers All Tomorrows are hoping it will be the doorway into establishing them within a European if not global metal spotlight. Listening to the encounter it is easy to suspect it is a desire destined to find success at some point as their impressive release and sounds assaults more ears and appetites. It is not a startling proposition, the band’s sound as familiar as it is promisingly fresh, but the album is a certainly stirring and increasingly magnetic incitement hitting the sweet spot of ears and emotions with persistent regularity.

All Tomorrows began in 2010, emerging from Santiago with the inspirations of bands like Gojira and Meshuggah in their creative blood and vision. 2011 saw the release of debut album Opilion, an acclaimed release at home and further afield. It helped push the band to broader attention, a recognition reinforced and increased by a live presence which has seen All Tomorrows share stages with bands such as Children of Bodom, Voivod, Megadeth, and At The Gates over the subsequent years. Their sound is tagged as progressive metal, if an extreme strain of the style, but as Sol Agnates reveals there is equally a death metal voracity and nature to their music which adds to the drama and intensity of songs. It also suggest that this is a band which gives equal concentration to every aspect of sound and to creating a release, the album an imposing proposal of clarity which allows every note, syllable, and rhythm to individually resonate and linger whilst uniting for a riveting predatory provocation.

All Tomorrows - Sol Agnates_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     It all begins with the album’s title track, a song which takes a mere second to unveil a web of sonic intrigue and temptation through the guitars of Pepe Lastarria and Ramón Pasternak backed by rigorously intimidating rhythms. Choppy riffs and beats stalk and badger the senses whilst the fiercely, raw vocal delivery of Lastarria is as abrasive as it is magnetic. You can openly hear the Meshuggah influence but equally as the outstanding opener vents its hostile creativity, there is a sense of Mudvayne and In Flames to the striking confrontation. The sonic enterprise of the guitars persistently flare up with sizzling endeavour across the song whilst the bestial tones of Oscar Arenas’ bass are as compelling as the wild but skilled swings of drummer Pablo Martinez are punishing.

The album could not have got off to a better start and keeps the raw power and impressiveness going through both Undying Seasons and Eidien. The second track equally rampages into view on a torrent of inhospitable rhythms and ravenous riffs, all seriously inviting whilst bound in acidic grooving and pierced with spiky hooks. Again unexpected whispers emerge as the track expands its turbulence, Slipknot and Tool reminded of as much as those earlier mentioned Gojira and Meshuggah spices. The trespass of the senses continues to twist and rage, erupt and seduce across its length before making way for its similarly hectic and tenaciously flavoursome successor. Slightly less hostile at its start, grievous riffs and rhythmic barbs holding some restraint as vocals rasp with predatory intent over ears, the track sculpts its own individual maelstrom of persuasion equipped with rich grooves blossoming in another bed of contagious imagination.

A devouring stalking of ears by Fiver’s Visions keeps enjoyment high and thoughts impressed even if the track lacks a certain spark of its predecessors, whilst next up Downpour spills an animus of stabbing beats and fiercely scything riffs across a barbarous landscape. Loaded with antagonistic vocals and a sinister sonic narrative, the track is arguably the first to really begin exploring the rich progressive depths of the band’s imagination. Previous songs hinted at rather than fully employed that provocative side of the band’s songwriting, and even this track does not dig too deep whilst thrilling ears, but Burnt by Call of the Bleak after definitely makes a bolder leap as it lights up the senses. Also fuelled by a relatively uncompromising aggression, the track’s guitars entwine imaginative textures with evocative invention whilst even the rhythms rein in their rabidity as song and band create a certainly intensively tempestuous but equally absorbing kaleidoscopic adventure.

Immanence draws on the more truculent side of the band’s sound for its physically predacious proposal but the guitars ensure they flirt with a melodic tempting between moments of sheer carnivorous majesty. It is a blistering challenge and treat, a bruising entrapment of the passions leaving the listener embracing the melodic opening of Ophidian Vibrations like a comfort blanket. The song allows that security to be assumed before uncaging its own nefarious enterprise and creative nature, riffs and rhythms fuelled by destructive hunger but perfectly tempered by the band’s venture into melodic flames of sound and progressive imagination.

Sol Agnates is concluded by the epic turmoil of Union, vocals and musical expression angst soaked as rapacious rhythms roam alongside a sinful bass tone. It is a bewitching roar of volcanic emotions and turbulent sounds aligning for a powerful and lingering conclusion to the riveting release.

It is impossible to imagine that All Tomorrows will be a South American ‘secret’ for much longer once Sol Agnates gets to work on new ears and attention. As ever of course, a hefty slice of fortune will be needed but if not with this album there can be no stopping the band breaking into the strongest recognition if they carry on creating treats like this as their music evolves.

Sol Agnates is available from May 19th via most online stores.

http://www.alltomorrowsband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/alltomorrows

RingMaster 19/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Static Fiction – All In

Static Fiction

US pop punks Static Fiction have been compared to Green Day most consistently since, well emerging in 2011 really. For us maybe Nerf Herder would be an even closer reference but it has to be said that there are certain moments within new EP/mini album All In, that you cannot help imagining that if The Beach Boys were breaking now with a punk inspired sound, they would not be too far apart from this Californian quartet.

Their six track romp is a thoroughly captivating encounter, with half its songs impressive and the other offerings irresistible adventures of sound and enterprise. Influences to the band include indeed Green Day alongside the likes of Weezer, NoFx, Bouncing Souls, Bowling For Soup, Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, and…well the list is long and it is fair to say that many are openly worn on the sleeves of songs. What sets the band apart from the current pop punk crowd though is an additional power pop tenacity and a flood of hooks which are simply fresh and uniquely imaginative. All In still feels like it had more to give but could not quite realise all of its promise, though in turn it rigorously hints that there is the potential for a killer album from Static Fiction in the future.

The Huntington Beach band released their very well-received debut self-titled EP at the very end of 2012, a proposition recorded with award winning producer/engineer Ryan Greene. The band were determined to enlist the man’s services, hitting up a Authority Zero gig in Arizona and pleading with that band’s lead singer for Greene’s number. It led to a link up which has been repeated with All In, a release which is a thick thrilling leap on from its predecessor. The time between releases has seen a change in the Static Fiction line-up too, another fresh and potent element we would suggest helping make All In one unforgettable tempting.

STATIC FICTION_ALL IN_Reputation Radio/RingMaster ReviewUM COVERThe release opens up with Main Street and straight away hits ears with feisty rhythms and excited riffs, both entwined with swiftly gripping hooks and flavoursome melodies. The vocals of guitarist Paul Lapinsky are just as impacting from the off, welcoming backing contributions across the band and song to similar success. The more grizzled bassline of Ryan Brown is another spicy lure but then again everything from the thumping beats of drummer Derek Goodwin to the smiling enterprise of guitarists Noah Dunbar and Lapinsky just colludes in an incendiary endeavour of fun. There are also little twists and creative additives vocally and musically which provide shards of unpredictability to the encounter and shows that the Static Fiction songwriting is just as boisterous and eventful as their sound.

The strong start is instantly matched by the following Keep It Moving. Arguably less unique than the opener, the bright stroll and energetic swagger of the song is still a magnetic and infectious proposition with its addictive chorus especially enslaving. There is a touch of Blink 182 meets Face to Face to the track which does it no harm at all, though it and indeed the previous track have to bow down to the exceptional Temporary which comes next. It is pure addiction, a cage of hooks and mischievous enterprise impossible to escape brought with a simply contagious creative grin. A sonic lure richly teases first before the song slips into a virulent amble of vocal enticing and infection clad hooks from across the whole line-up. The bass has a steely lure and beats a dramatic intent whilst the guitars just roll out a stream of temptation and incitement. Even the mellow caress of harmonies and melodies for the chorus has a certain unpredictable glint to its persuasion, though it is the bold and punchy ingenuity with a whisper of Billy Talent creativity to it, which particularly ignites ears and imagination.

     Something Amazing is soon doing its best to match the pinnacle of the release and with its summery warmth and vivacious stride is not far from hitting a similar mark in the passions. With flowing harmonies and evocative melodies against a sturdier rhythmic shuffle, that Beach Boys essence is most vocal here, though as anything suggested it is just another colour in the overall blend of rich flavours and textures within tracks. There is little chance of not finding feet agitated or indeed bodies leaping around to the song either, a persuasion emulated in the following Amra and its insistently catchy and energetic tale of The Graduate like attraction.

All In closes with Till the End, an acoustic proposal seeing Lapinsky and guitar alone in reflection. It is a very enjoyable track and is definitely placed in the right position on the release but just is a little bit of an anti-climax after the creative rioting before it, leaving that dulled feeling felt just after the party has ended and peace descends.

It is fair to say that we have not enjoyed a pop punk offering more in recent times and the fact that it also infers that there is definite potential for even greater exploits ahead with Static Fiction, it is exciting times….

All In is available now via most online stores.

http://www.staticfictionhb.com/      https://www.facebook.com/StaticFictionhb

RingMaster 19/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

XUL – Extinction Necromance

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Extinction Necromance is a release which wholly captivates whilst hitting the listener with a tsunami of malevolent sound and intent. Consisting of four tracks covering thirty minutes, the EP is a barbarous affair which at times defuses or certainly overshadows the invention and diverse textures within its depths through a continual tirade of vocal and emotional hostility. There is no hiding place from the encounter either, except the off button, but its creators Canadian metallers XUL, ensure that is never an option with their craft and fascinating enterprise.

XUL hails from Vernon, British Columbia and cast a merciless trespass of blackened death metal upon the senses. Influences to their intent include the likes of Behemoth, Dissection, Immortal, Emperor, and Watain, strong flavours noticeable in the band’s sound but without leaping miles away from such inspirations XUL has woven the spices into a sonic narrative built on the sole character of their imagination. Formed in 2008, the quintet released debut album Malignance four years later, a well-received encounter stirring up Canadian extreme metal especially across the Western side of the scene country, a recognition reinforced forcibly by the band’s live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Obscura, Exhumed, Vreid, Kampfar, Woods of Ypres, Macabre, Withered, Cephalic Carnage, Archspire, and 3 Inches of Blood. New EP Extinction Necromance sees the band explore their darkest depths and most malevolent emotions, filtering all into intensive examinations of ears and psyche.

It begins with Frozen, We Drown, an immediate consumption of the senses through prowling riffs and grooves punctuated by lurking rhythms. There is also an underlying swing to the opening baiting of ears, a trait which is regular bait whether in a gentle melodic persuasion, a rugged rampage, or an unbridled savaging. There is also thrash bred virulence at the start which with the rabid sonic intensity subsequently evolves into a melodically scenic landscape of constantly developing climates and unpredictable intent. The track continues to shift and switch its attack and sound, merging murderous sonic and rhythmic affairs with almost seductive hugs of calm and evocative suggestiveness. XUL’s sound, as each song upon the EP, is not suitable for a lightweight consumption. It is with continual examination that the busy terrains and almost insidious nature of the aural tapestries unravel for increasingly dramatic and impressive proposals. That is not to say it is not a potent first introduction made, just a matter of almost too much to digest and get a handle on initially.

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

It does ensure every listen is a slightly different and fresh adventure too, epitomised by the following Orbit of Nemesis. It rises from the release with a heralding fanfare of horns and celestial harmonies, the epic air suggested in the orchestral hints of its predecessor in full regalia here. Like a majestic bird soaring into an expansive and thickly coloured atmosphere the track sparks the imagination but like the same being swallowed by the jaws of a violent storm, the expressive opening of the track is devoured by a bestial sonic explosion. The band surges over the senses from within that assault; volleys of violent beats from Lowell Winters the spearhead of a hellacious onslaught brought by the bass predation of Marlow Deiter and rabid guitar causticity from Wallace Huffman and Bill Ferguson. With the raw primal tones of vocalist Levi Meyers leaving their own inhospitable residues in ears too, it is a gripping fury taken to greater heights by the toxic but sonically invigorating grooves and shards of melodic imagination spilled by the fingers of Huffman.

As the first track, though maybe not as openly tangible, there is an evolving aspect to the raging and another swing to its vicious stroll, an ingredient which marks each song in varying ways and degrees as shown by third song Chaos Requiem. Rolling in on a ‘gentler’ gait and intent than its excellent predecessor, the song is soon sledgehammering the senses as guitars weave a tempting lure of melodic intrigue and expression. The turmoil is exhausting, ensuring that the brief respites when they emerge feel like oases in the merciless storm. It is increasingly gripping and an intensive incitement which as mentioned needs time to fully explore but more than rewards the effort.

Final track Summon the Swarm coaxes with the calm of water and a reflective melody before unleashing sonic and rhythmic carnage, but a tempest openly and precisely sculpted by each element of the band. It also delivers a thick anthemic lure alongside its punishing tirade of sound and voice, the track at times as intoxicating as it is corrosive as it frees a maelstrom of emotion and musical drama, especially in the closing ravishing of ears.

The more time Extinction Necromance is given the more it impresses, an undeniable success which marks XUL out as a band to watch closely as they surely start luring in a more global attention, starting right here. It might not quite be the best blackened death metal protagonist you will meet this year but it will be the one of those enticing the most repeats plays.

Extinction Necromance is available from May 19th @ https://xulmetal.bandcamp.com/album/extinction-necromance

http://xulofficial.ca/   https://www.facebook.com/Xulband

RingMaster 19/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net