Little Lapin – Remember The Highs

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It was only a couple of months ago when Little Lapin seduced and enthralled with the single Remember The Highs, its masterful coaxing of ears and imagination the wake-up call to the mesmeric sound and voice of the UK singer-songwriter for a great many. The acclaimed track also revealed inventive and bold songwriting, something her fans were already vocal about and now impressively confirmed by the artist’s debut album also called Remember The Highs. It is a fascinating and captivating collection of songs which with diversity and melodic resourcefulness simply leave thoughts and emotions spellbound.

Little Lapin is Lucy Hill, a Devon bred songstress now based in Bristol who has been entrancing audiences from the UK to New Zealand and New York since emerging round 2012. Musically her inspirations include the likes of Regina Spektor, The Cranberries, Florence & The Machine, Laura Marling, PJ Harvey, The Cure, and The Pixies, many providing creative whispers in what is a sound and songs which are openly distinctive to Hill. The swift proof comes with the last single, though before that she had bred a strong and loyal fan base through a tantalising live presence and releases such as earlier tracks Sound of Summer and Winning Is Losing, and more so a self-titled EP last year which sparked attention from the likes of Tom Robinson on BBC Radio 6 and regular online radio play. It is easy to assume though this was just the appetiser to more fevered responses and acclaim destined to be earned by Remember The Highs, the album a beacon of melodies and harmonies set to draw greedy appetites like moths to a flame.

a1696187169_16   The album opens with Magnet Eyes and an immediate inescapable tempting of warm guitar and keys taken to another enslaving level by the unique tones of Hill. Her voice has a quality of sounding familiar as well as freshly bewitching, but from person to person it seems we hear someone different as a reference, the likes of Laura Marling, Regina Spektor, Sinead O’Connor, and Chrissie Hynde just some references used, with the latter the closest for us as a descriptive hint. As the song stretches its melodic nature and evocative air, a shadow of darker resonance comes into play to catch the imagination all over again, whilst voice and keys especially almost flirt with rich expression and emotive radiance.

It is a captivating start, but also a potent teaser to the glories of the following Over The Draft and the album’s title track. The first of the two songs creases ears with an initial persuasion of guitar again quickly enhanced by the sultry tones of Hill. Eager rhythms then gently and enticingly march into the exotic landscape now being cast by keys, everything settling into a scenic lure of melodic mystique and catchy hooks with the voice of Hill one giant romance of a snare. Its successor remains as potent as the first time heard, and if there is an air of Chrisse Hynde in the second track, Remember The Highs wonderfully reeks of The Pretenders in its sonic groove and provocative melodic hooks. Vocally too Hill brings her spiciest tang to syllables and a slightly nasal croon reminiscent of the Ohio musician. The darker bred bass groove alongside the irresistible winy flames of guitar is equally as compelling, the song providing one delicious embrace of tenacious enterprise and beauty.

The acoustic opening to Go!Stop!Go! has ears lit and body swaying instantly but it is the brooding air of drama cast through keys and an orchestral breath which ebbs and flows across the track, that turns a potent encounter into a spellbinding one. It is a serenade with haunting shadows and dark aural reflections which offer a melancholic temper to the invigorating partnership and narrative of voice and melody. The song just blossoms with every listen, its slower initial smoulder, compared to the previous songs, soon as engrossing and seductive as anything upon the album.

Sound Of Summer rolls in next on a rumble of rhythms which quickly evolves into an embrace of seventies seeded Beatle-esque keys and the ever inviting vocals. Occasional crescendos of drums add to the expanding and again sultry canvas of the song, guitars and keys colouring its scenery with alluring and imagination inciting enterprise to which bass adds swarthy lines of juicy shadows. Once more there is no option but to sink into the depths of a song before being left face to face with the rockier acoustic persuasion of In My Mind. The song is barely a stroll across the senses but even in its low key gait reveals a tenacious and sturdier character in its absorbing balladry compared to its predecessor.

Both songs though get over shadowed by the outstanding Colour Blind, a track emerging as a definite favourite. It starts on a thoughtful and evocative persuasion of guitar, Hill in moments adding her reflective vocal spice for an engaging start. Soon though, everything erupts into a gently concussive belt of emotional and creative turmoil, agitated rhythms and clanging riffs consorting with fiery keys in a bedlamic expulsion. It is a striking and thrilling twist to an already highly persuasive proposition providing yet another major highlight in Remember The Highs.

The album finishes with firstly the melancholic but again vibrantly arresting Panic, a song which has an essence of the drama found within The Smiths songwriting to it, and finally the closing warm smile of A Nice Coincidence. Contrasting textures flirt from within the encounter, sombre strings find themselves courted by skittish rhythms and another seduction of voice and melodies. The lyrical side of songs, as once more shown here, is just as intriguing and enticing, Hill able to cast hope in dark experiences and show the shadows within the brightest adventures.

Remember The Highs is a musical love affair for the senses from an artist in Little Lapin, who has the potential to become one of Britain’s most exciting and innovative singer songwriters. Thinking about it as her album seduces once again, she already is.

Remember The Highs is released on May 15th @ http://littlelapin.bandcamp.com/album/remember-the-highs-2

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/littlelapin

RingMaster 14/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Abrahma – Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird

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It is not a rare event to immerse in a release of expansive and spellbinding imagination, to be taken out of the real world into a creative adventure for an hour or so. It is less often though that you get simply lost within a proposition of such complex and unrelenting ideation that you feel trapped, caught in a claustrophobic tsunami of creative consumption where only the brief gaps between songs offers a hint of escape. Not that you will want to break free from the fascinating and suffocating glory of Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird, the new album from French rockers Abrahma. It is an irresistible and exhausting emprise of perpetually evolving sound and dramatic atmospheres, an experience as sombre as it is bewitching and as creatively ravenous as it is emotionally disorientating.

There is no real surprise that the album is so intensively and imaginatively imposing, its predecessor Through the Dusty Paths of Our Lives when released in 2012, a similar maelstrom of sound and invention, as described elsewhere as a “heavy odyssey peppered with Hindu mysticism and voodoo convolutions”. The new album has taken that canvas to new and even more expansive and hypnotic realms; every track an individual journey uniting for one colossal and wonderfully unpredictable landscape of senses examining, thought provoking heavy rock.

Released as its predecessor via North American label Small Stone Records, Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird makes a low-key entrance as Fountains Of Vengeance comes into view on a wave of sonic noise and intrigue, eventually stepping from its presence with thick beats and equally tense riffs and grooves. A grungy air also lines their invitation as the sombrely delivered tones of vocalist Sebastien Bismuth bring a colder subdued presence to the already mesmeric encounter. His and the guitar of Nicolas Heller increasingly entangle and merge to cast a raw and magnetic web of sound, hooks potent and melodies fiery as the song creates a tapestry of Stone Temple Pilots like tempting with invasive post rock ambiences and psyche bred exploration. The song roars and seductively sways across its ever twisting adventure, keys from again Bismuth inventively caressing the darker prowling hues of bass and the predatory beats cast by Benjamin Colin.

Abrahma_album_Artwork     The following An Offspring To The Wolves is immediately a darker imposing character, the bass of Guillaume Colin resonating with menace and toxic enticement as a doomy air colludes with stoner-esque sonic expression. There is an underlying swing to the lumbering infection surrounding the captivating and varied vocal delivery of Bismuth, part of a slow smothering of the senses sparking with flames of sound and emotion across the consuming prowl of the senses. As all tracks upon the album, it is impossible to fully explain all of the textures, emotions, and dark almost meditative radiance oozing from the cauldron of sound and invention at work, but easy to say it is thoroughly absorbing.

Omens Pt. 1 comes next, its sultry climate and sweltering melodic intrigue lying somewhere between psychedelic and occult rock, its exotic lure almost shamanic on ears and thoughts. That of course is only part of the picture, rhythms at times a rapacious confrontation whilst melodies and vocals spill an evocative croon within the explosive causticity embracing ears. It is bewildering and fascinating simultaneously, needing as all tracks plenty of partaking of its proposal to come close to exploring its world. The same of course applies to equally dramatic and engrossing Weary Statues, the track a tapestry of carnivorous intensity, volatile textures, and emotion fuelled drama. It is all, with much more, woven into another transfixing and physically stifling tempest sculpted with creative ingenuity, bold unpredictability, and mouth-watering craft.

Next is the spellbinding Omens Pt. 2, a peaceful reflection of surf rock seeded beauty shimmering with melodic elegance and a haunted breath which becomes more unsettled and agitated with every passing tangy caress and melancholic sigh, Another switching of calm and ruffled intensity eventually leads to a bedlamic finale set ablaze by the slightly psychotic flames of sax from album guest Vincent Dupuy. It is inescapable bait, enslaving attention and emotions before making way for the mystical, tempestuous flight of Kapal Kriya, the track another brooding mix of varied heavy rock sounds in one diversely layered, intimately spatial adventure.

The raging diversity and expectations ruining enterprise continues to thrill through firstly the ferocious rock ‘n’ roll stomp of Square The Circle, its charge on ears as probably assumed by now, never dawdling in one style, torrent of sound, or urgency of delivery for long. Its outstanding incitement is followed by the emotional and increasingly physical turbulence of the excellent Omens Pt. 3 which then moves aside for the equally enthralling A Shepherd’s Grief, which features guitar solos from Monster Magnet guitarist Ed Mundell. It is a squalling seduction, employing vast arrays of challenging spices and emotions in its expansive soundscape, and yes it is creatively sorcerous.

The album closes with the mournful beauty and blistering fire of Conium, a devouring sonic embrace bringing a thrilling release to a dramatic conclusion. The Abrahma /Thomas Bellier produced Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird is a virulent listen which can be as uncomfortable as it is pure seduction, but with constant attention grows from an impressive encounter into something very special.

Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird is available on CD and digitally via Small Stone Records @ https://smallstone.bandcamp.com/album/reflections-in-the-bowels-of-a-bird

http://abrahmamusic.net/      https://www.facebook.com/ABRAHMAMUSIC

RingMaster 14/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Heg & The Wolf Chorus – Rain EP

Photos by Karen Dickinson

A rare beauty has blossomed in the Bristol area of the UK, and it comes as the sound of folk/dramatic pop band Heg & The Wolf Chorus and their new EP Rain. The three track release is a mesmeric and fascinating embrace of seductive vocals, similarly enchanting melodies, and a lyrical theatre which revels in inspirations from “traditional fairy tales and the twisted roots of her own family tree”, the ’her’ in question being songwriter Heg Brignall. It is a bewitching encounter reinforcing a belief already cultured here by the likes of Lizzyspit, Little Lapin, and the UK based Roxanne De Bastion to name three, that the British music scene is blessed with the finest folk inspired revelry in a long time.

Heg & The Wolf Chorus has been exciting ears and imaginations for a while now to be fair, their acclaimed two-song release Boat and I in 2013 the first spark to keen attention. Last year was another potent time for the band too; the release of the Giant single and the following A Tale of Sailors EP reinforcing their emergence whilst igniting even hungrier appetites for their music. It also saw the band nominated for the Isambard Folk Award, have Giant nominated for Song of the Year in the Fatea Magazine Awards, and Three Sailors declared Single of the Year by the Folkscene show BBC Merseyside. Rain is sure to emulate that success for the quintet of Brignall, Stephanie Taylor, Richie Dobson, Vince Martin, and Joe Kelly, or at the very least awaken another healthy parade of eager fans.

Rain EP out april     Song For Home is the first kiss on the imagination, an instantly atmospheric enticing as a cold wind blows in the distance behind the dark seducing of cello strings and the warm caress of Brignall’s vocals. Smouldering harmonies swiftly add to the persuasion as the song’s lyrical narrative casts an entrancing romance for thoughts to equally embrace and explore. It is a union which never expands further in sound but casts with its slim line collection of textures, a full and mesmeric temptation.

The exceptional start is potently backed by the following EP title track, piano and violin offering the first melodic hug before being joined by the siren-esque tones of Brignall and accompanying band harmonies. Flirting with fresh twists and invention along the way, the song creates a web of creative infectiousness and emotional reflection captured perfectly in the tantalising warmth and poetic lure of the melodies which grace every sun lit and shadow kissed texture.

The release is completed by Sail On, a captivating stroll of emotive keys and feistily alluring strings coloured further by the richly hued vocals, bracing harmonies, and an intimate stroking of half melancholic/ half wistful violin endeavour. As the other pair, the track is a spellbinding caress of ears and thoughts, one full of adventure and mystery but encased in a folk serenade luring the listener into compelling landscapes well away from their physical reality.

From presence to songwriting, sound to storytelling, Heg & The Wolf Chorus is a delightful and mesmeric escape from the grey of day into at times just as shadowed but much more exciting and irresistible exploits as found upon Rain.

The Rain EP is available now @ https://hegandthewolfchorus.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/HegandTheWolfChorus   http://www.hegandthewolfchorus.com/

RingMaster 1/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net