Oh! Gunquit – Eat Yuppies and Dance

IMG_9819

Time to meet your new favourite band and album, and the beginning of frequent visits to hospital A&E because of the twisted rhythmic effect on the body and the deranged dance-floor tempting offered. The culprits are UK provocateurs Oh! Gunquit and debut album Eat Yuppies and Dance. With more agitated rhythms than found in a Cardiothoracic unit entangled in a web of virulent contagion built on salacious grooves and naughtily flirtatious temptation, the band’s sound is pure irrepressible addiction. Hints of their devilish practices have been unveiled for quite a while by singles, videos, and an acclaimed live presence, but with Eat Yuppies and Dance, the London based quintet has just infected the world with their finest moment yet.

With a sound presumably self-tagged as rumble-bop trash freak-a-billy, and you have to say it fits perfectly, Oh! Gunquit has its seeds in a meeting between neighbours Tina Swasey and Simon Wild at a North London vinyl-only sweaty cellar club DJ night. Apparently from an energetic pogo competition the pair decided to form a band based on their mutual love of wild garage punk, exotica, raw rhythm ’n’ blues, and surf-trash. This was 2011 and since then the band they subsequently formed has become an eagerly devoured proposition across shows and festivals which have seen them playing with the likes of Black Lips producer King Khan with his Shrines, Fat White Family, Public Service Broadcasting, Andrew Weatherall, and Keb Darge amongst many. One gig even saw Adam Ant make a “crazed” impromptu stage invasion whilst radio has been just as hungry for their songs. This has all been backed by a pair of limited edition and self-released seven inch vinyl singles and tantalising videos to match. Now with Dirty Water Records, the band has uncaged their greatest bait of sound and devilment yet to seduce and enslave towns, nations, and the world.

Front Cover 2 flat (1)     With a line-up completed by Kieran, VV, and Alex, Oh! Gunquit equip Eat Yuppies and Dance with a torrential revelry which can fall into anything from psyche rock and pop to garage and punk rock, and on again to rockabilly and surf rock and that is still only part of the full musical stomp which starts with opener Sinkhole. The resonating slightly tinny beats which accost and incite ears from the first breath of the song are the sign of things to come, their anthemic lure having one single aim with their actions, to ignite body and emotions. Vocals jump in swiftly with the same impact before the song slips into a sultry groove woven caress of surf temptation over a vivacious garage rock canvas. The voice of Denver bred Tina brings an enticing tang to the exploit as does the acidic kiss of guitar enterprise which flames across the encounter, everything combining for a potent and lively start to the album.

It is an opening quickly over shadowed by the brilliant Head Bites Tail, an exhausting tapestry of dark pop and fiery rock ‘n’ roll best described as The B-52s meets The Cramps whilst being filtered through the warped funk voracity of Rip Rig & Panic. Brass seduces with unbridled toxicity across the song whilst rhythmically it is as busy and inescapable as the first seconds after doors open on a Black Friday high street sale. The vocals are equally as volatile and excitable in quite simply one quite exhilarating proposition.

Sixties beat lined and blues hued Caves strolls in next, its suggestive swagger as tempting as anything cast by your favourite temptress. Once more there is a great tinge of B-52s to the exceptional enslavement but to that there are additional essences of garage punk bands like The Orson Family, the bluesy seducing of a My Baby, and the garage pop escapade of The 5.6.7.8’s in the mix. The song is pure aural sex but as becomes a habit with Eat Yuppies and Dance as soon as you think the band has hit a pinnacle they come up with an even more deviously addicted treat, in this case Bad, Bad, Milk. Vocally and musically insatiable, the track is sheer addiction from the first flying syllable and rhythmic swipe to its final infection loaded spark. Everything from the chin down is in rapid union with the merciless stomp, every beat, groove, and flame of brass simply Class ‘A’ addictiveness to which vocals and melodically mischievous hooks are the ringleaders.

     The fuzzy sax hazed, seventies psyche pop dance of Hope In Hell provides another new colour to the diversity of the album, before Pony Boy brings a rockabilly/fifties rock ‘n’ roll tenacity to its garage punk shuffle to ignite ears all over again. Think Imelda May meets The Horse Party and you get a whisper of its epidemic of sound and persuasion, again Eat Yuppies and Dance stretching its creative landscape.

Into The Woods visits a bluesy backwater scenery in the imagination next, rock ‘n’ roll keys a la Fats Domino, luring excitedly from within the sweltering but inviting climate of the song. A great merger of fifties and modern rock pop, the song flirts and dances with ears and emotions until making way for bubbly rock ‘n’ roll of I Need Help Now. As its predecessor, the song casts a spell on body and vocal chords whilst creating a new twist of dark pop adventure within ears and album, at times skipping along like a predatory version of The Shangri-Las in a fiery entanglement with Cradle.

All the big irresistible rhythms and anarchic incitements are out for Voodoo Meatshake, their rabid seducing matched by brass and vocals which in turn are bound by searing grooves and a suggestive stroking by keys. It is an explosion of lustful sounds and rousing energies, one of those feel good assaults on the senses which have you exhausted and bloated with pleasure. The same applies to closing song Lights Out; a rhythm ‘n’ blues romp leaping around fondling the passions like a mix of The Revillos and King Salami and the Cumberland 3. It is a glorious slice of sonic diablerie, a mouth-watering hex on feet and passions bringing the similarly sorcerous Eat Yuppies and Dance to a dramatic and thrilling end.

There is no remedy to the potency and create toxins of Oh! Gunquit’s sound, just more lust emerging with every listen of their brilliant first album.

Eat Yuppies and Dance is available now via Dirty Water Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/Oh-Gunquit-Eat-Yuppies-and-Dance-CD/p/47051183/category=2749844 and https://ohgunquit.bandcamp.com/album/eat-yuppies-and-dance

https://www.facebook.com/ohgunquit/

RingMaster 02/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

MFC Chicken – (Get Outta The) DJ Booth and Lake Bears!

 

(Pics: Lorenzo Pascual & Dena Flows)

(Pics: Lorenzo Pascual & Dena Flows)

After two ridiculously infectious and excitable slabs of rock ‘n’ roll devilry posing as albums, London based MFC Chicken in their own words “figured it was time that we gave the DJs out there something to spin when out in the wilds. A full length album is great for playing at house parties but in a sleazy cellar bar with some frantic dance floor action the DJ’s gonna want a proper vinyl 45.” So that is what the band came up with, not one but two slices of MFC Chicken revelry to ignite the dance-floor, a pair of incitements which simply throw feet and emotions into a blissful frenzy.

It is fair to say we unknowingly had a sweet spot lying in wait for a band like MFC Chicken, an inner instinct stroked and seduced by the band’s two frantic slabs of R&B fuelled rock ‘n’ roll going by the names of Music For Chicken in 2012 and Sold Gravy two years later. With hooks and beats inescapable bait, vocals virulent incitement, and flames of sax an intoxicating bedfellow to all around them, both releases created an insatiable stomp of surf and garage rock within a web of Rhythm and Blues embraced vintage rock ‘n’ roll. There is no stopping the MFC Chicken sound once it takes hold, or a live presence which has seen them the darlings of festivals, venues, and differing countries alike. And it continues in potent style with the new singles, the quartet of Spencer Evoy (tenor sax, vocals), Alberto Zioli (guitar, vocals), Ravi (drums), and Zig (bass) on fine and irrepressible form once again.

DJ Booth sleeve(Get Outta The) DJ Booth opens with its title track and a vintage guitar tang which kisses ears before beats and vocals add their potent spices to the fifties bred rocker. Like a mix of Ray Charles and Bill Haley, the song managing to have the fiery essence of the former in firm collusion with the cleaner sounds of the latter, it blazes away with rampant keys and melodic tenacity as rhythms continue to stomp through ears and into the passions. It is a simple, busy, and irresistible encounter matched perfectly by accompanying song Colonel Sanders’ Bastard Son.

The second song has the kind of nostalgic swing which was never out of place in either a Chick Berry stroll or a Connie Francis pop persuasion. It soon takes on a rawer, almost dirty nature though, leaning much more towards the bluesy garage enterprise of The Sonics thereon in. This is tempered by the sonic imagination of the guitar and the ever inflammatory call of the sax, each individually offering a warmer but no less mischievous enticing to envelope the lyrical revelry. As its predecessor, the track is gorgeous, and the single alone enough to make MFC Chicken the focus of current attention.

Of course there are two offerings and Lake Bears! is just as compelling and thrilling an encounter. Its first track is Lakebears Theme and in some ways has an even more anarchic and Lake Bears Cover Spread.inddvoraciously devilish manner to its presence and sound than on the other release. Imagine Little Richard even more over excited than normal whilst Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Jerry Lee Lewis bring their own distinct slightly salacious invention, then you are close to the two minutes of rock ‘n’ roll rampage going on.

Second track is called Theme From Lakebears, a devil fuelled instrumental with voodoo beats and demonic sonic lures around tribalistic vocal urges. A lively shimmer of surf rock adds even more sinister qualities to the outstanding tempting of ears and imagination, providing if taken as one, a blissful end to four increasingly magnetic new MFC Chicken products.

Roll on another album is all we have left to say.

(Get Outta The) DJ Booth (Dirty Water Records) and Lake Bears! (FOLC/Dirty Water Records) are both available now on 7” vinyl and download via http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/MFC-Chicken/c/2990295/offset=0&sort=addedTimeDesc

https://www.facebook.com/MFCChicken   http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/mfcchicken

RingMaster 02/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Loons – Miss Clara Regrets

dwc1078_front

Ahead of their new album on the legendary Bomp Records, San Diego quintet The Loons have released a two track single on Dirty Water Records. The songs, Miss Clara Regrets and Alexander, the latter a cover of the Pretty Things classic, were recorded exclusively for the label and alone reveal that over the twenty years or so that the band has been treating ears they seem to get more potent and essential.

Consisting of vocalist Mike Stax who is equally known for Ugly Things magazine which he runs, bassist Anja Stax, guitarists Marc Schroeder and Chris Marsteller, and drummer/producer Mike Kamoo, The Loons again bring the sixties psyche beat/pop invention which seems to run through their veins with their own modern pop tone to the single. And once more the band captivates with a slice of raw pop majesty.

Miss Clara Regrets instantly has ears engrossed and the appetite licking its lips as a deliciously throaty bass hook aligns with pungently anthemic beats, they both in turn wrapped by a flowing wine of sonic enterprise. Feet and indeed body are soon pumped up and bouncing to the swing of the song, its contagion inescapable as is the melodic acidity soaking every magnetic second of the incitement. It is one of those songs which simply tap into the wants of any pop rock fan, of any era, whilst merging nostalgia and modern instincts into a slice of addictive rock ‘n’ roll.

The Loons do not fiddle too much with Alexander, staying close to the original character of the version from the band which Mike makes no secret of adoring and constantly champions their cause. They do give it that Loons snarl though, vocally and musically which brings another hue to the set in stone classic. It is a great company to Miss Clara Regrets, though it is the lead song which ultimately steals the plaudits and lures these ears back time and time again.

If Miss Clara Regrets is a hint to what the band’s new album has in store for us all, expect nothing less than unbridled fun and enjoyment from that too.

Miss Clara Regrets is available now via Dirty water Records on 7” vinyl and download @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Loons-Miss-Clara-Regrets-b-w-Alexander-download/p/47051206/category=2749844

https://www.facebook.com/TheLoons.SD

RingMaster 02/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net