Dark flights in ravenous shadows: talking The Kahless Clone with Vito Marchese

TKC

Emerging from the creative invention and imagination of Novembers Doom guitarist Vito Marchese, The Kahless Clone and debut EP An Endless Loop has been one of the most sonically cathartic and emotionally imposing debuts to hit 2015 so far. Exploring a new realm of sound and textures in the instrumental soundscapes making up the release, Vito simply takes ears and imaginations on flights through seductively oppressive soundscapes of encroaching shadows and sombre beauty. It is very different creative exploration to that of his ‘day job’ so we thought we would dig deeper into the man and project. With thanks to Vito who was very accommodating of our questions we looked into the origins of the band, the decision to venture into a new musical direction, his dark music and much more…

Hi Vito, many thanks for sharing time to talk with us.

You are obviously more renowned for your music with Novembers Doom to most at the moment, so when did the idea and seeds to the emergence of The Kahless Clone start to blossom within you?

I had the idea of starting The Kahless Clone at the start of 2013. Another band I was in at the time was dissolving, and I wanted to make sure I had something else going on to fill up that space. Progress was slow at the beginning since Novembers Doom was working on writing our Bled White album, so I was focusing on that.

The accompanying press sheet to the band’s debut EP, An Endless Loop, said the band was formed to be an outlet for your instrumental music. Was that the only reason; was there a need to explore new areas too for you and your songwriting?

Having that extra creative outlet was a main reason, but other reasons included having a project that would be more active with performing live and doing long tours. I also wanted to do a project that was different than what I had done in the past. I wanted to explore some of my influences that I couldn’t really bring to the table in Novembers Doom. In The Kahless Clone I’m able to do some electronic and experimental types of ideas and songs.

I am assuming you have been writing instrumental tracks for a while? Where does this stretch you in different ways to your work with Novembers Doom?

I hadn’t really written instrumental music specifically before this project. I always pictured my ideas having vocals over them, and structuring songs in a way that would complement vocal melodies. With The Kahless Clone I can be a little bit more experimental with structures, and not have to worry about how vocals are going to fit over something.

Have you discovered new ideas and adventures in your writing for The Kahless Clone and the EP which surprised you?

Before writing music for The Kahless Clone I would always focus on creating solid and hooky riff based ideas that would later turn into song structures. The riff was the most important part of the song to me. I have a much different view point on songwriting now. I’m much more interested in creating a mood and atmosphere within the song, instead of writing cool riffs that get your attention.

How did you link up with the rest of the band?

Zach Libbe who did the electronic drum programming was the only person that I hadn’t worked with previously. We have mutual friends, and I had heard his electronic stuff before. I figured I’d shoot him a message and see if he would be down for working together. Luckily he turned out to be a really awesome dude, who knew exactly what I was looking for and was able to create it. I was in a band called Divinity Compromised with Andy Bunk and Ben Johnson. I knew they would be able to add a lot to the songs so I asked them if they would want to work on the EP. I play with Garry Naples in Novembers Doom, and knew he would be a great fit for this project as well. I’ve been very fortunate to have had the ability to work with really great musicians over the years.

Is this a fixed line-up or just for An Endless Loop and musicians will be a fluid line-up for future releases?

I really love working with the line-up that I had for An Endless Loop. I would love to use this line-up for the next release as well. I think it will come down to everyone’s schedules. When I started this project, I knew that I would want to be able to control when the band could go do things like record and tour. I didn’t want to get into a situation where things were ready to go, but some people didn’t have a free schedule. I like to keep things open where if need be, I can find session members for tours or studio recordings.

Your sound is described as dark music. Can you expand on that for newcomers?

When I say dark music, I mean that these songs are based on themes and moods that can evoke dark and somber feelings instead of your typical fist pumping, head banging reaction that most metal brings on. I wanted the listener to be able to get lost in the music and have it wash over them. Also calling it “dark instrumental music” is easier than saying “ambient progressive instrumental post-rock/metal with electronic elements”. It’s also a lot less confusing.

Are there any specific inspirations to your own musical tastes and invention which you would say have spiced your sounds with The Kahless Clone?

A major influence on me for creating The Kahless Clone was the band This Will Destroy You. I first heard them a few years ago, and was just blown away by their sound. I wanted to do something similar to that style, but mixed with my heavier influences, as well as electronic sounds. My goal was to create music that fans of atmospheric post rock, and metal could both enjoy and get something out of.

TKC PromoImageIn regard to An Endless Loop, were the first tracks upon it already set in tone in sound and direction before the other guys were involved in its recording or was there further evolution through their contributions?

I had made demos of the songs with drum parts and keyboard ideas on them. I knew what I wanted, but needed extra help in getting those ideas to actually sound good. I knew the guys would be able to take the ideas and really turn them into something great. I didn’t have any ideas for the bass, because I wasn’t entirely sure what direction I wanted it to go. Should it be a prominent part of the song, or more laid back and holding down the bottom end? Luckily Andy created some amazing bass lines that combined both of those things. Chris Wisco, who is my producer and engineer, then added his creative ideas and input on top of all of that.

Give us some insight into the recording of the EP.

This entire EP was self-financed by me, so it took a while for me to gather the funds and get open studio time booked. It was done in three separate sessions. Zach did the programming at his studio and sent me the finished tracks. After that Garry went in and recorded his drum tracks at Belle City Sound in Racine, WI. A couple of months after that Andy, Ben, and I went in and recording our tracks at Belle City Sound as well. We took another couple of months off, and then Chris mixed and mastered the EP.

How long was it in the making, from seeds to final day in the studio then?

The idea of the band started in early 2013, and the EP finally came out March 17th 2015. It’s been a long time in the making, but I think it was worth the wait. I’m really proud of how this EP came out, and it looks like a lot of people are digging it.

In our review we said the EP “lures ears and imagination into a soundscape of intimidating possibilities and melancholic beauty.” Did you have any specific intent with the release and music or is it a wholly organic exploration for yourself and indeed us?

I knew I wanted to make songs that were able to capture your attention and put you into a dark mind set. It’s easy to dictate how you should feel by the use of lyrics, so I wanted to try to challenge myself by creating feelings by only using the music and song titles. I think the artwork that Heather Lovett did for the EP helps enhance those feelings as well.

Did new ideas and thoughts of experimentation emerge whilst creating An Endless Loop which you are excited to explore further next time around?

I’ve never been into using effect pedals as a main songwriting tool. In the studio, Chris brought out some pedals that I had never used before, and I really liked how they sounded. I’m sure I’m going to explore some new ideas with different effects and tones. I think it’ll help me break out of the same routine you go through when trying to write music.

Have you found fans of your other work are taking to these new adventures and fascinating journeys with keen interest and anticipation?

It seems that fans of Novembers Doom and my other projects are liking what they are hearing from The Kahless Clone. That’s really great news, since I didn’t know how people would react to this EP. I think these songs came out great, and it’s a nice bonus that other people think so also.

What comes next for The Kahless Clone, we can assume it is an on-going project for you?

The Kahless Clone is going to be working on our live show, and focusing on touring and performing live often. A follow up recording is being planned for later this year as well. There is definitely more to come.

…And in other news from other band/projects ahead?

Novembers Doom just released our newest album last summer called Bled White. If you haven’t checked that out yet you can get it anywhere you buy digital music, or from The End Records.

Once again big thanks for talking with us Vito. Are there any last thoughts you would like to leave us with?

Thank you Pete for your support, this awesome interview, and the great review of An Endless Loop! You put a lot of work and thought into your reviews and interview questions. It’s much appreciated. Thank you to your readers as well. You can buy our music at all digital music stores, and you can get our physical cd at www.thekahlessclone.bandcamp.com

Check us out on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter.

www.youtube.com/thekahlessclone

www.facebook.com/thekahlessclone

www.twitter.com/thekahlessclone

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 14/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Oaths – Stag Party

Oaths - Promo Shot

Never hurts to make a good first impression and UK band Oaths certainly have that intent nailed with debut EP Stag Party. A busy and furious storm of hardcore and melodic rock, the five track fury is an imaginative entrance by the Manchester quintet. Arguably it is too imposing and tempestuous on first listen to really appreciate the rich potential and creative tenacity within its walls, but proper attention soon reveals band and release to be an exciting and compelling proposition.

Consisting of vocalist Topher, guitarists Curtis and Michaela (the latter also providing vocals), bassist Jack, and drummer Chris, Oaths emerged in 2013 with inspirations from the likes of The Dillinger Escape Plan, Glassjaw, Every Time I Die, and Norma Jean in their creative arsenal. Last year saw the band hitting the road around the country, earning a potent reputation for their live presence and a success continuing into 2015 with the band recently completing a tour with Faces of Eve. Produced by Mike Bennett from Empires Fade, Stag Party is the band’s new mighty nudge on national awareness, a release which goes for the jugular from its first breath and tugs away on the senses and a keen appetite from thereon in.

Oaths Cover ArtworkThings instantly boil up with opener Lover Another, though its initial touch is abrasing if relatively calm. The raw hardcore bred vocals add a swift aggravation to the brewing atmosphere as do the similarly imposing beats which punctuate the impending intensity. It is a rising tempest though which relaxes just a little as a melodic enticing from the guitars adds to the harsher riffs and rhythms, and similarly a more melodic vocal delivery joins the caustic roars. Passion and angst is soon raging again amongst the fresh progressive and variety filed textures of the song, everything from rhythms to sonic endeavour evolving in imagination and fascination.

The strong start is matched by Idols / Rivals, a track fuelled by punk aggression and melodic adventure which ebbs and flows in aural intensity on the beaches of the senses. As in its predecessor, there is a great unpredictability to the offering which brings intrigue and exciting twists to a more familiar yet no less captivating hardcore seeded canvas. Every move from raw aggression and hostile atmospheres to harmonic elegance and melodic beauty is seamless musically and vocally whilst combined it finds has a clarity wrapped place for every aspect in the impressing proposal.

Hank Moody continues in similar style, an almost beauty and the beast collision of textures uniting for a dramatic and riveting incitement. The song does not quite grip as tightly as those before it for an undefined reason though the fact it does not seem to have the constant distinctiveness of those before might be one factor. Nevertheless everything about the song is in firm hold of ears and attention, the driving rhythms magnetic and the guitar enterprise at times simply bewitching, whilst vocally, and especially on the cleaner side of things, it is potent and enjoyable theatre as the contrasting tones share the lyrical and impassioned heart of the song.

As good as Stag Party is already, it hits personal tastes perfectly across its final two songs, turning into a raucously contagious slice of rock ‘n’ roll at the same time. Amsterdam comes first and though it is still a hardcore and progressive/melodic rock eruption the song discovers a contagious virulence and creative exploration which emerges as more gripping hooks, spicier grooves, and rhythmic imagination. At times bestial and in other moments a fiery seduction, the song is superb and swiftly matched if not surpassed by the closing I Am The Danger.

The band’s current single, the track is instantly addictive and ruggedly infectious, bounding in on intimidating rhythms and an enthralling sonic escapade. Riffs from the guitars and bass snarl, whilst their individual hooks are venomously poppy; traits explosively aligning to the increasingly impressing vocals which burst from across the band. Within a thumping cage of fierce beats, the track is exceptional and with the previous song alone, ignites a real appetite for Oaths and their increasingly thrilling sound.

Stag Party is a release to take your time with; first impressions are good but only get better. It also sparks an expectation to see Oaths grow into a strong and potent force within the hardcore scene, not only at home but further afield. If not they have certainly unleashed one intensely enjoyable debut anyway.

Stag Party is available from April 13th through all platforms.

https://www.facebook.com/OathsUK   https://twitter.com/OathsUK

RingMaster 13/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Slow Readers Club – Cavalcade

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After a clutch of increasingly impressive and fascinating singles across last year moving into this, anticipation of Cavalcade, the second album from UK indie rockers The Slow Readers Club was high and excited for a growing sea of fans, including us. Each of the quartet of songs offered was a riveting teaser and evidence of the band’s upcoming release and diversely sculpted sound respectively. Those propositions still shine like flaming beacons as they sit within the walls of Cavalcade but are matched by a collection of new to the ear tracks which simply seduce ears and imagination.

Hailing from Manchester, The Slow Readers Club have been no strangers to acclaim these past months. Their singles have drawn frequent praise and support from fans and media alike whilst their live presence has seen highly successful shows with the likes of Catfish & The Bottlemen, The Struts, Reverend and the Makers, and The Sunshine Underground as well as well-received appearances at Tramlines Festival, Party in the Pines, and the Blackthorn Festival. Journalist and frontman for Goldblade John Robb predicted that 2015 would see The Slow Readers Club breaking through to become one of the most important bands to emerge from Manchester’s music scene in recent years. Everything has backed up his suggestion and certainly Cavalcade has brought the year one of its major triumphs.

Picture 2     Creating an emotive and cinematically coloured mix of indie and electro pop, The Slow Readers Club has an embracing and immersive sound which places the listener into the scenery and heart of each song’s narrative as if physically there. Instant evidence comes with album opener Start Again. Its opening cauldron of electro temptation is an immediate potent lure, one only intensifying as a throaty bass line links with choppy guitar riffs and the equally magnetic vocals. It comes with an eighties electro pop breath, as most songs, yet creates a suggestive web of new and unique tempting which is best described as B-Movie meets Interpol but is solely The Slow Readers Club. The embracing keys of Aaron Starkie and the imaginative guitar enterprise of Kurtis Starkie weave an inescapable persuasion, their vocals similarly richly alluring though to be fair every aspect of the song is a lingering incitement, the almost dirty tones of James Ryan’s bass and the punchy beats of drummer David Whitworth equally irresistible, and when it is all united what emerges is a sublime piece of pop alchemy.

Impressive as it is though, the song is surpassed by the following I Saw a Ghost, surely the bands best song to date though it is seriously challenged by other tracks on the album. The band’s recent single, it opens with voice and beats casting a swift and dramatic proposal, one caressed by the warm evocative texture of keys. It is not long before the again wonderfully heavy voice of the bass is aligning itself to the lighter hues of guitar, each contrasting and enhancing the other and the evolving proposition. The entrance of the bass also seems to inspire a heftier energy to Whitworth’s swings, creating a captivating merger of light and dark tones and also as a physical persuasion. The track is sensational, once more seemingly bringing differing decades of pop into alignment for a seriously compelling and intoxicating slice of anthemic tempting.

Forever in Your Debt has a darker emotive air to its presence, from its first breath the bass casting a solemn yet inviting tone to the song and continued by the impressive vocal expression and qualities bringing the song’s premise into ears and thoughts. Bubbly guitar and atmospheric keys add to the brewing drama, every twist revealing new shadows and corners to eagerly explore whilst sound wise there is a post punk like essence tempering the potent heat of melodies and hooks.

Three songs in and variety is as open as the connecting prowess of the band’s imagination, the mesmeric Plant the Seed giving further swift proof. Like a blend of Depeche Mode and Bronski Beat, the song is a transfixing croon of dark electro and synth pop, entrancing ears before leading them into an almost visual passage of intimate reflection and radiant persuasion. A track which impresses from the first play and only grows more potent, it is emulated by the melodically and emotionally climatic Days Like This Will Break Your Heart. It is a brooding inventive roar of an encounter which is almost volcanic in its intensity and sonic landscape. Both tracks continue the immense flight of the album perfectly but are put in the shade a touch by the outstanding Don’t Mind. It is one of those serenades which linger with unrelenting persistence, a lively and evocative caress which just connects with situations we have all been through whilst providing an absorbing soundtrack. With a touch of Black/ Colin Vearncombe to its croon, the song is seductive balladry at its most sublime.

The album’s title track is next and needs little time to bewitch as spicy guitar endeavour fuels a feel of The Smiths at its beginning. It’s reserved but potent start soon builds into a thicker and more dramatically hued theatre of emotion and sound where spices of The The and The Associates flirt with the band’s ideation. The track adds to the growing list of the major moments on the album, and there are so many, before making way for Fool for Your Philosophy to reveal its tangy electro enterprise and dark drama. The almost sinister rhythms of Ryan and Whitworth are worth the price of ‘the ticket’ alone, as too the exceptional vocals whilst the vibrant and energetic dance of keys and melodies are a fire in the enthralling darkness of the song.

Both Grace of God and Here in the Hollow hold body and emotions tight, the first a beautiful intensive flirtation with a Frankie Goes To Hollywood charm and vivacity to it whilst its successor, from an enticing simmering start, grows into one glorious anthem of sound and emotion where vocals again are the mighty instigators to the irresistible theatre of the song sculpted by colossal sounds. We mentioned some songs rival I Saw a Ghost for the pinnacle of the band’s songs to date and this is a definite contender.

The enthralling and emotively fuelled Secrets provides an excellent pungent drama next before things are brought to a close by Know the Day Will Come a song which makes a slow and decent enough start but erupts into another creatively incendiary exploration for ears and emotions. It is a thumping end to a quite exceptional album.

Expectations were high because of the band’s previous singles but The Slow Readers Club has surpassed them and themselves with Cavalcade. The bare fact is that it will be astonishing if you find a better rock pop album in 2015 then this modern classic.

Cavalcade is available now, digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/cavalcade/id979245862 and on CD/vinyl via http://theslowreadersclub.bandcamp.com/merch

http://www.theslowreadersclub.co.uk     http://www.facebook.com/theslowreadersclub

RingMaster 14/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Dead Shed Jokers – Self Titled

Dead Shed jokers new cover

Released two years ago, the Peculiar Pastimes EP unleashed one of our persistently favourite songs of the past few years in the frenetic and inventive shape of its title track. Now its creators, Welsh rockers Dead Shed Jokers return with their new album, a self-titled affair which is fiery and explosive rock ‘n’ roll at its multi-coloured imaginative best. Across eight tracks, band and sound brew a tempestuous and riveting riot of captivating enterprise and incendiary adventure drawing on every form of rock music you can imagine for one individual and exciting devilment.

Hailing from Aberdare/Merthyr, Dead Shed Jokers impressed with debut album Peyote Smile in 2011. It awoke the UK scene to a new almost mischievously inventive band which the Peculiar Pastimes EP reinforced with its title track alone. The rest of its tracks were live cuts which confirmed that on stage the band was just as furiously explosive and compelling too. All the attributes and qualities of both releases have been pushed on again with the Pity My Brain Records released new album, but equally an even greater impacting, attention grabbing diversity and maturity has festered inside the band’s songwriting and sound. The result a release which is as unpredictable as it is stormy and as fascinating as it is immediately contagious.

The album opens with Dafydd’s Song and instantly throws a wall of fiery grooves and imposing rhythms against ears. Its melodic toxicity and scorching guitar endeavour has the imagination whipped up just as quickly too, especially as classic rock tones align to the drama of the vocals now riding the ferocious wave of sound and adventure. There is a theatre to song and sound, something evolving to matching success across the remainder of the album, and coloured by the increasingly impressive vocals and spicy grooving.

From a sensational start things mellow with Delay the Morning. Well for its start anyway as gentle melodies court a scuzzier atmosphere. Once the vocal roar erupts though so the intensity of the encounter grows, every element uniting in a bracing storm of sonic hooks, tangy grooves, and driving rhythms wrapped in raw energy. There is a touch of bands like The Dropper’s Neck and Damn Vandals to the song especially in its punkish psyche lit elements which equally only adds to the intriguing and addictive character of the outstanding creative brawl.

A Cautionary Tale as its predecessor begins its tempting with a gentler coaxing before flexing its rhythmic muscles and sonic sinews for a theatre of explosive rock ‘n’ roll. There is a carnival-esque quality to its underlying swing whilst the busy sounds around it weave a tapestry of everything from alternative and progressive rock to dark and psychedelic rock ‘n’ roll. Intimidating and transfixing, the excellent offering makes way for Memoirs of Mr Bryant, the band’s recent single. Rich in blues hues and face melting energy, the track bellows and stomps with aggression and tempestuous intent, at times seeming to flirt with the senses but for the main treating them to a furnace of invention and power.

The volcanic and ferocity of the album seems to kick up another gear with Made in Vietnam, as does the infectiousness and warped ideation. A rugged assault in some moments, a sultry seducing in others, the track is a maze of sonic endeavour and melodic flaming employing a volatile fusion of stoner, hard, and blues rock. Once again ears and appetite are inspired to offer lustful reactions, as they are also with the enthralling Love is Diseased which follows. Swimming through a psychedelic haze, the song ebbs and flows in intensity, increasingly tightening its grip on thoughts and psyche with vocal harmonies, furious riffs, and sweltering grooving, not forgetting the submerged but open catchiness at its core.

The release is brought to a fine end by firstly the irresistible raucous stroll of Rapture Riddles, a blistering stomp of searing creative intrigue and vocal drama, and lastly Exit Stage Left (Applause). The final song is a voice and piano led calm after the tempest of creative fury igniting the rest of the album, and another enjoyable twist in the adventure of the release. It too has a fierce edge which emerges towards the song’s closing touch showing that even in more peaceful waters there is never a moment where you can make assumptions about the songwriting and invention of Dead Shed Jokers.

Rock ‘n’ roll can come in many forms, and most infused into this album, but often there is that final spark of creative danger and bravery missing. Dead Shed Jokers are fuelled by it and it is at its most accomplished and exciting on their new release. Now it is time for the world to show the same boldness, grab a listen, and reap the rewards.

Dead Shed Jokers is out now via Pity My Brain Records digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/dead-shed-jokers/id983757315 and on CD where the first 100 will receive some extra goodies via https://deadshedjokers.bigcartel.com

https://www.facebook.com/DeadShedJokers

RingMaster 14/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Ignotum – Larvas Mortal God

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Linking up with the Ronin Agency not so long ago, Italian black/death metallers Ignotum recently released debut album Larvas Mortal God and from a strong first impression, it is a release which grabs the imagination to impress more and more with every listen. On the surface the album is an enjoyable and accomplished proposition but it is with time that is reveals its own unique character of sound and creative textures to stand out from the crowd. Whether it will emerge as a major favourite is to be seen but already the album is a temptation enticing us back again and again.

The Como band was formed in 2011 by guitarist Fabio Guereschi and seemingly made swift and strong impressions on the local scene, widening that awareness and support with the release of a well-received self-titled EP in 2013. Recorded and released as last year closed its eyes, Larvas Mortal God is the first major nudge on the strongest spotlights from the band, and one easy to see making Ignotum a wider known and thought of incitement in the extreme metal scene.

The release starts with Through Madness Reminiscience and instantly is a sonic tirade on the senses, riffs and rhythms a merciless torrent but with that hostility tempered by spirally and instantly alluring grooves. The raw and coarsely expressive vocal squalls of Marco Capuzzo lay aggressively on ears but with just enough variety to make them adventurous and as magnetic as the tempestuous sounds brewing around him whilst the driving and evolving guitar enterprise of Guereschi and Luca Borghesi (no longer with the band), spins a captivating web matched by the formidable rhythmic collusion of bassist Stefano Zarantonello and drummer Federico Mascetti. As mentioned about the album, the song makes an appealing first touch on ears straight away but it is with time and attention that the nuances and at times less vocal invention reveals itself for greater reaction and pleasure.

COVER   The potent start continues with Soul’s Self Mutilation. Its atmospheric synth crafted opening is a stark contrast to the roar of its predecessor but it too it soon raging with aggression and passion. The repetitive nature of grooves and rhythms entice from within the sonic intensity swirling venomously around the landscape of the track, whilst again melodies and colourful creative hooks bring a refreshing and sparkling hue to the imposing storm. It is an inventive blend fuelling all the songs upon Larvas Mortal God but apart from at times a surface familiarity flowing over the release, it never smothers the individual definition and character of tracks like the following Inhale The Void and in turn The Circles’ Kiss. The first of the two immerses the senses in a blackened trespass and though it lacks the spark of its predecessors, imagination and craft ensures it is an evocative encounter before its successor uncages its own oppressive canvas of almost portentous sound and vocal snarling. It is the physical and emotive voracity which is missing in the first of the pair but back stoking the raging fire of the second and seemingly sparking greater toxicity in the sinew swung rhythms and scorching grooves veining the song.

Mary L. equally confronts the senses with a fiercer almost corrosive persuasion, one soaked in acidic sonic endeavour and provocative melodies. The song merges hostile and seductive scenery with a fluid and captivating prowess, flowing from one to the other and back again with ears enthralled. Despite its mighty offering though it is soon over shadowed by the outstanding Abyss, You Shine. The opening tangle of melodies and grooves around a contagious rhythmic tempting is enough to spark new hunger in the appetite. Again the band twist raw aggressive dexterity and intensity with mellow and entrancing seductions, one never overpowering the other and always creating a seamless passage of fascination and thorough enjoyment.

The album’s pinnacle is followed firstly by the more rabid but controlled turbulence and emotive mania of In Skinless Dream and then the atmospherically fiery and raucously trespassing Hecatomb Memories. The second of the pair is arguably the lightest on the album with an open progressive infectiousness which almost demands to be liked. Not quite carrying a poppy texture in its make-up but certainly, despite an increasing rhythmic and vocal ferocity to its climax, there is something more easily accessible to the track than in those before. Both songs ignite ears and thoughts masterfully before the closing Clown With Crown ensures the album leaves on another unhealthy and appealing slab of aural savagery and sonic venom, which you may not be blown away by but certainly will easily develop an increasing urge to explore more of, just as the album.

Produced by Luca Briccola, Larvas Mortal God is an impressive proper introduction to Ignotum, not a release to set a fire burning but easily potent enough to put the band on the map and given time to become a constant lure for repeat attention.

Larvas Mortal God is available now via Mentalchemy Records from most online stores

http://www.ignotum.it/   https://www.facebook.com/IgnotumItaly

RingMaster 12/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

 

 

Calico Jack – Panic In The Harbour

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If you are planning to take to the high seas in order to undertake devilish pursuits, a check list will include a sturdy vessel, lush beard, a potent weapon and of course a jolly roger. You might also need a suitable soundtrack too and that is what Italian metallers Calico Jack can offer in highly enjoyable fashion. Recently signed to the Ronin Agency and working on their debut album for a release later this year, we thought a retrospective look at their previous EP Panic In The Harbour was in order, especially as it is now getting another thrust into the broader world and inspires potent anticipation for the band’s first full-length.

Hailing from Milan, Calico Jack was formed in 2011 by brothers Toto (rhythm guitar) and Caps (drums), the pair taking the band name from Captain John Rackham’s nickname, a notorious English sea raider who sailed across the Caribbean Sea during the Golden Age of Piracy and famed for inventing the pirate flag, the Jolly Roger, and for having two notorious pirate women is his crew: Anne Bonny and Mary Read. Fusing classic eighties heavy metal with Scandinavian folk metal and creating exploits inspired by Anglo-Saxon sea shanties and folk songs, the band swiftly grew in personnel, releasing their first demo Scum of the Seas in 2012. Panic In The Harbour was unleashed a year later to great responses at home and around Europe. Now with fresh interest in release and band, and that impending full-length, the line-up of Toto, Caps, Giò (vocals), Melo (lead guitar), and Dave (violin), is ready to had a very potent year.

COVER - Front     As soon as opener Where Hath th’ Rum Gone? whips up attention with a lure of bow across strings you get a rich inkling of what is in store, and once thumping beats hit and riffs gallop with riotous devilment, the Calico Jack sound and its character is in full blaze. There is no escaping an Alestorm reference or of Running Wild but equally there is a healthy spice of a Korpiklaani in its revelry, a dirty Adam Ant essence within its colourful nature, and the punkier metal of Kvelertak to its roar. The grouchy guttural vocals bring the intimidation whilst swashbuckling exploits are driven by violin, hooks, and anthemic rhythms, not forgetting just as magnetic group shouts. The dark addictive tones of the bass also only add to the compelling adventure and though it is fair to say that there is a great familiarity to the band’s sound, equally it makes for a fresh and feisty proposition.

The opening enjoyable contagion of the ale sodden proposal is immediately matched by House of Jewelry. It makes a more imposing entrance, riffs and that increasingly captivating throaty bass colluding for a magnetic and aggressive coaxing. Vocals and the heavy drum swipes built a hostile environment but one coloured by the spicy flame of violin and the instinctive swagger and swing of the emerging encounter. Again you basically know what you are going to get but it does not stop the blend of classic and folk metal creating an infectiously captivating escapade for ears to devour and the imagination to eagerly run with.

Grog Jolly Grog is another drinking song you just instinctively raise your tankard to whilst rocking your body with the raucous sway and volatile attitude of the addictive festivity. It also brings a whiff of old school punk to its hooks and raw abrasive riffery, nothing dramatic but an appealing scent explored more in the closing Deadly Day in Bounty Bay. The final song is the most adventurous and inventive on the EP though that imagination is certainly beginning to show its flair and temptation towards the end of its predecessor.

     Deadly Day in Bounty Bay opens with lapping waves on a shore and a single tempting of guitar. The ever alluring bass soon adds its voice to the emerging narrative of raw riffs, salty violin seduction, and melodic winery. The start of the track has ears and imagination gripped but it is when it takes a breath and returns with a virulent bait of lively beats and contagion fuelled bassline that the incitement really comes alive. Everything from the gruff vocal delivery to coarse riffs, the jab of rhythms to teasing hooks has an irresistible infectiousness to them, one bred with a post/punk tenacity which is more Clash/ Damned bred than anything. In fact at times it is easy to suggest the song is the folk metal equivalent of The B52s’ Rock Lobster.

Ending with its best track but only thrilling ears from start to finish, Panic In The Harbour with its re-emergence to fresh attention is a recommended appetiser to the upcoming album from the band. If it can live up to the anticipation now inspired we will see, but we will bet no gold against it.

The Panic In The Harbour EP is available now from most online stores.

http://calicojacktheband.altervista.org/  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Calico-Jack/269653663086210

RingMaster 12/04/2015

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