Possessor – Stay Dead

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Like so many we were ravished and bewitched by Electric Hell, the debut album from UK metallers Possessor which was unleashed last year. It was a tremendous persuasion of sound and enterprise reinforced by a retrospective listen of their first EP Wings of Fire, which came out just a few months before that impressive full-length. They have a sound which is raw and voracious yet unafraid to embrace a melodic and sonic toxicity come seduction which is as fierce and flavoursome as the hostile and sinister landscapes it infiltrates. Now band and music has drawn a new lustful submission with new EP Stay Dead, a release realising all the qualities of its predecessors in new and raucously adventurous exploits.

Hailing from London and formed late 2013, the trio breed their insidious temptation masquerading as sound through merging occult metal with sludge and thrash bred hues and tenacity. It is a fusion emerging with a sense of familiarity yet providing distinctly new and incendiary provocations and temptations. They are like a mix of Black Sabbath, Electric Wizard, Kylesa and Therapy?, a hellacious assault on the senses and demonic seducing of the psyche.

cover     The EP opens on a real high of a track and the release never does anything but look down from lofty heights again. Lucifer Stay Dead opens on a rumble of motorbike before descending on the senses swiftly after with a tsunami of riffs from guitarist Graham Bywater and bassist Marc Brereton. With swinging beats just as feverishly hostile and immediate aligned to a sonic enterprise from Bywater sparking early lusty reactions, the track prowls and snarls with bestial irreverence. The song is simply predatory, everything about it soaked in real hunger and antagonistic ferocity. There is no letting up of its intensity either, those ravenous riffs seemingly gaining in strength and appetite across the track whilst rhythms simply grow bigger balls of attitude within a flaming melodic web.

It is an exceptional start matched by Night of Venom straight after, a track which launches itself on the senses with an even heavier and intensive assault. Of course it also comes with that instinctive seduction, an exciting sonic spicing which tempers the viciousness. Brereton’s bass delivers its dirtiest, rabid tones ever though, whilst the contagion of riffs and grooves coring the encounter, like in its predecessor, has a repetitive niggling which simply evolves into an irresistible addiction. This is where that Therapy? essence comes in for us, the song reaping the nature of the same type of persuasion which lit up the N. Ireland trio’s early work.

With it definitely being too short, fair to say you cannot get enough of its primal tempting, the track makes way for Cobwebs, a smiling slice of pop rock. Nah don’t be silly, the song is another portentous stalking of the senses, though to be honest it does have a more respectful swagger to its energy and character too. Of course this is bound in menacing and dark hearted bass growling and just as grizzly riffery, whilst the drums almost call out for mercy such the psychical and gripping sledging they get. It many ways the track is like the darkest Hammer Films of the seventies, its demonic presence and nature wrapped in alluring colourful designs set to entrap before the horror begins.

The EP closes with Lights Out / Crypt of the Sorcerer, the darkest, chilling, and most toxic offering on the release, arguably from Possessor ever. Its classic psych charm is a deceit within a cavernous smothering of devil seeded ensorcellment, the appetiser before a devouring of senses and emotions within a swamp of thrash sculpted riffs and occultist violation. It is sonic smog of seventies and current classic metal twisted and wrung out until breeding its own scorching and intoxicating sludge thick blasphemy. The track is quite simply a thrilling end to another stunning release from Possessor, even with its infernal fade out.

Possessor last year set a plateau with Electric Hell for themselves and the current British occult metal scene, but has now left it behind as a past marker in their emergence with Stay Dead. Maybe only the brave will dare immerse in the world of Possessor but with rewards plentiful and lingering within their aural necromancy, truly no metal /heavy rock fan should fear giving them a go.

The Stay Dead EP is available now via http://possessor.bandcamp.com/album/stay-dead-ep

https://www.facebook.com/possessorband

RingMaster 02/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Bivouac Detectives – Shooting The Breeze

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If you are looking for a mellow moment to wash away the grime and emotional trespass of the day then a date with The Bivouac Detectives is definitely in order. The British duo from Birmingham has just released debut album Shooting The Breeze, a twelve track seduction of acoustic rock ‘n’ roll providing chilled and often mischievous adventures for ears and imagination.

The band consists of vocalist/guitarist Norm Elliott, formerly of Norm and The Nightmarez and before that Micky & The Mutants, and bassist Mick Couch of psych/indie poppers The Oracle Project. Their union has emerged as Norm’s last band comes to a close and the Mick’s outfit releases their new single Shine A Light On You. The Bivouac Detectives has a distinctly different sound to both of those propositions yet equally fuses whispers of rockabilly instinctiveness and psych temptation into the songs which tantalise from within Shooting The Breeze. Recorded this past January and now released via Western Star Records, the album is a web of flavours colluding to present rock ‘n’ roll at its stripped down, expressive best.

With all songs penned by Norm and coloured by the united skills of both men, the album opens with Sant Amorai. Norm’s guitar instantly caresses ears with a melodic seduction, its tone and the song’s atmosphere sultry and melancholic simultaneously. It is a climate aided by wistful keys around tenderly plucked strings whilst the bass provides a slow croon in its own right, adding solemn hues to the tale being revealed by the distinctive vocals of Norm. The song borders dark country with psychedelic spicery and for four minutes plus has senses and thoughts transfixed.

11018871_369520576560947_6746865838487829245_n   The following Fine Memories brings a more folkish embrace, though yet again those emotive shadows show their magnetic faces again. An intimate reflection hugged by bass and guitar, the song serenades with a raw mesmeric charm before making way for the smiling enticement of Beyond the Planets and in turn the reflective/nostalgic commentary of Car Windscreen. The first of the two has that aural Englishness which no other land can emulate, a quaint and infectious devilment which has body and psyche bewitched whilst touring additional spices from further afield. Its successor has a sound which is almost Brit pop like in an acoustic scenery sparking thoughts of those sixties/early seventies visual dramas of real life from the streets.

That looking at the lives of those which came before across varied decades of Britain continues with the excellent Friends, King and Country, the tale of old soldiers and sacrifice. Melodies and bass hues cast a creative theatre which is shaped further by the striking narrative of lyrics and vocals, it all inviting ears and thoughts to be potently involved in an aural archive of life.

I’m Fallin’ In Love has the listener entranced yet again with its fifties rock ‘n’ roll croon. Vocals and melodies offer a cheeky twang to their exploits which can only be greedily devoured whilst the bass resonates with its own just as captivating tempting. The best track on the album it has the old school innocence and poetic simplicity which wrapped many a Buddy Holly proposal whilst Wilberforce Montgomery next, returns to that English folk bred persuasion of earlier songs and explores the fictional/real? tale of a soul earning his deserved attention only after a poor and unrewarded life has past.

The album’s title track lays its claim to the passions next with its blues rock temptation, again a vintage tang flavouring the thrilling stroll before the evocative romance of Under the Moonlit Tree dances with the imagination and straight after and the country blues theatre of Show Me Mercy grabs its own healthy share of the plaudits gathering thickly around the album. Like Elvis sings Tom Waits, Norm and Mick create a compelling persuasion bred from decades of musical seeding.

With a title like They Danced By the Light of the Moon you expect a lively romance of a song and the pair does not disappoint, entwining rockabilly and folk in an energetic yet smouldering embrace emulated by the song’s protagonists. It is another inescapable infection of a song, a rich continuation of the creative persuasion fuelling the album, though shaded a touch by the closing revelry of Badabadabadabada. You have seen those films and shows where the archetypal Englishman with the twisty moustache and striped smoking jacket flirt with and charm the ladies? Well this song is the musical equivalent. Once more that specific British sound pervades the imagination but in tandem with a fifties rock ‘n’ roll croon which comes so easily to the songwriting of Norm, as shown across his previous bands.

The song is a brilliant end to a tremendous release, an inspired and mouth-watering escape from the ills of the world if only for forty minutes or so. Hopefully this is the first of much more from The Bivouac Detectives, but if not, Shoot the Breeze alone has the potential to ensure the band gains and deserves a place on the weekly soundtrack of a great and increasing many. We do not want another Wilberforce Montgomery going on do we?

Shoot the Breeze is available now via The Western Star Recording Company @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/shooting-the-breeze/id973800036

https://www.facebook.com/Bivouacdetectives

RingMaster 02/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

KynchinLay – Dark Age

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It is fair to say that indie rockers KynchinLay made a potent impression on a great many with their Drink Me EP but now they return over a year later with its successor showing that as tasty and impressive though it was, the last encounter was only the appetiser to a mightier meal of invention and creative imagination. Dark Age is a compelling slice of shadowed drenched rock ‘n’ roll, five tracks which manage to roar, vent, and intimately seduce within their individual lengths and characters. If the last EP had you licking lips in enjoyment, the new offering from KynchinLay might just have you bellowing in delight.

Hailing from Liverpool, the core trio of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter K G Wilson, bassist Mal Williams, and drummer Damien Welsh has openly pushed on in songwriting, sound, and imagination with their new release. There is a fresh maturity and roundedness to all songs providing a consistent incitement of temptation across the release which arguably was lacking or certainly less imposing with Drink Me. The previous encounter also had a healthy and enjoyable essence of artists like Echo and the Bunnymen and even more so Pete Wylie to it but Dark Age is something hard to reference to anyone with its own unique personality of sound.

Again their music offers a mix of rock, punk, indie, and power pop but it is a much darker and aggressively gripping tonic of sound this time around, as instantly evidenced by the explosive start to first track I Be Hopin. Drums immediately descend with a lively swagger of beats, an anthemic lure swiftly embraced by a sonic wind and an almost rabid scourge of industrial bred riffs. Once a tangy hook emerges too persuasion is a done deal though the sudden relaxing into a mellow vocal and melody clad hug takes ears and thoughts by surprise. It is also initially disappointing see the passing of such an outstanding start but KynchinLay soon has new this intimacy of sound and expression strolling with contagion and alluring enterprise. The air of the song also openly moves along, intensifying with every passing chord and sonic flirtation to create a tempestuous landscape of sound and emotion employing the essence of that tremendous opening again. The result is a climax which is as menacingly fiery as it is feistily captivating.

The following Wide Awake opens on an acoustic guitar and vocal croon, a gentle tempting which has little difficulty courting satisfaction and intrigued attention to its evocative rock pop shuffle. It is another song which builds up a more volatile atmosphere and intensity as sultry flames colour the emotive walls of the song around the great mix of vocals from across the band. The track enthrals, holding ears and appetite easily before departing for Back To What She Knows. Entering on a deliciously throaty bassline scythed through by evocative sonic invention, the encounter twists into a mouth-watering dark rock ‘n’ roll enticement. Its touch is spicy and it’s bewitching climate a sweltering embrace of tangy melodic drama. Wilson‘s vocals bring a great tempering to the sizzling heat of the song though, his tones flirting with a monotone, deceptively expressionless delivery but he gets it spot on and only accentuates all the surf rock like theatre around him. The best track on the EP, it leaves a smile on the face and in the emotions with ease.

Another round of infectious rhythmic bait opens up BatJazz next, a proposition evolving from a psychobilly like lure of grooves and hooks into a lighter pop rock stroll with a funky reggae infused gait. There is still a shadow rich air and presence to the song though which only adds to the adventure, a toning which inspires the subsequent sinister climax which sees the return of that irresistible opening sound this time in hand with a great exotic and mystique wrapped ingenuity.

The EP ends with Shudder, a classic slab of rock ‘n’ roll in anyone’s book. It is fair to say it is not a track designing new templates but holds heavy satisfaction in its hands with rock music crafted and energised in passion and more essential flavours than found on a recipe card. It is old school and modern rock ‘n’ roll united and a thoroughly enjoyable climax to one thrilling encounter.

In many ways KynchinLay has come of age with Dark Age yet you still sense there is plenty more still to be discovered and explored within them. Good exciting times ahead we suspect.

The Dark Age EP is available now via http://kynchinlay.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/KynchinLay/242399799167716

RingMaster 02/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Gone By Friday – Quarter-Life Crisis

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Having grabbed attention with debut album Noisetank in 2011, New York pop punksters Gone By Friday have taken their time with its successor, whether by choice or not, but now return with Quarter-Life Crisis and it is fair to say that the band has upped the ante in sound, adventure, and fun.

The Queen’s quartet has discovered a new vivacity and energy in songwriting and sound, and they were no slouches there anyway as their last album proved. The eight tracks making up Quarter-Life Crisis simply leap at ears with a creative and imaginative vitality yet still retain the raw touches and essences which helped the band stand out in the first place. There is a maturity to the release which translates as contagious invention and whilst the release is still pop punk in its core form it captivates with raucous charm and fevered enterprise.

Formed in 2009 and tapping inspirations from the likes of Bouncing Souls, Greenday, Lagwagon, Rancid and Blink 182, Gone By Friday soon found their feet in the New York underground scene. The FreEP, a free to get EP and their live presence soon gripped ears and appetites, as well as establishing a base for their sound which Noisetank potently built upon. Now with another leap, Quarter-Life Crisis is here to re-ignite their tempting of new and broader awareness, and it gets off to a stomping start with The Hadean. The track opens on a blaze of guitar riffs which instantly has an old school punk/seventies R&B persuasion before muscular rhythms and scythes of sonic colour add to the heavily enticing start. There is a heavy rock essence with a touch of Sum 41 to it also, though it is not long before the pop punk heart of the track is romping with melodic infectiousness. The throaty basslines of Sean Ho provide their own striking bait within the encounter, but only matched in potency by the swinging beats of drummer Chris Berardi around the guitar enterprise of Peter Berardi and Billy Kupillas, with the latter’s vocals similarly bringing rich lures.

GBFcover   The strong start is swiftly matched by the raucous revelry of It All Starts With Me, a thumping stomp of a song with grouchy basslines and addiction forging hooks galore. At only a handful of seconds past a minute in length, it is far too short but still provides a tsunami of contagion and energy to exhaust and thrill without reservation. The sigh of disappointment at its brief tenure is soon forgotten once the clunky riffs and anthemic tenacity of Poison Jam steps up to ignite ears and energies all over again. There is an open familiarity to the song yet it matters little as its catchy devilry embraces body and emotions with insatiable energy and creative appetite, a mix driving the release as a whole.

600 Miles opens on a delicious acoustic enticing next, guitar and voice an immediately engaging proposal backed by the percussive and broader sonic imagination brewing away within the energetic croon of a song. Though it does not quite generate the more heightened reactions of its predecessors, the song leaves satisfaction full and appetite greedier, wants fed with gusto by Say My Name and the album’s title track. The first of the two is another acoustically opened encounter but straight away has rawness to it, a scowl of sorts which bursts into a fiery and aggressively melodic provocation. Its successor soon outshines it though, its opening dance of once more acoustically bred riffs carrying a Latin tempting which in turn ignites a voracious and welcoming tempest of compelling hooks, anthemic vocal harmonies, and irresistible nineties inspired persuasion. The song is a glorious rampage which alone sums up all you need to know as to why Gone By Friday makes for a thoroughly fulfilling feel-good proposal.

The album closes with The Story So Forgotten, a track like the last which feels like an old friend in familiarity but a brand new acquaintance in sound and temptation. It’s increasingly building and almost volatile anthemic intensity brings Quarter Life Crisis to a mighty conclusion, followed by another sigh that it is all over before fingers twitch and submit to pressing play again.

If the likes of Goldfinger, The Bouncing Souls, and Blink 182 whet the appetite then Gone By Friday have a treat for you, but equally they offer plenty to entice and please all pop punk fans within Quarter Life Crisis, so off you trot…

Quarter Life Crisis is available now @ http://gonebyfriday.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/gonebyfriday

RingMaster 01/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Under Paris – Transitions

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A release does not always have to totally blow you away to make a compelling and perpetually appetising proposition, but it needs something at its core and invention which through any uncertainties and ‘issues’ acts like an alluring beacon. That is exactly what Transitions, the debut album from US metalcore band Under Paris has. There are elements which do not whip up the imagination and passions as pungently as others within it but consistently the release has ears and imagination seriously engaged, and though it might not take metalcore into something approaching new pastures the Iowa quintet’s ferocious incitement definitely has plenty about it to stir up serious attention.

Clinton hailing Under Paris began in 2012 and swiftly went to work enticing appetites with their first single If the Drugs Don’t Work, Can You Drive Me Home?, a track featuring Rene Lopez of Scarlett O’Hara. An acoustic EP called Clean Lungs and shows with the likes of Beartooth and The Ghost Inside only enhanced their emergence before the beginning of 2014 saw the release of debut full band EP Our Stories, recorded with Derek Moffat of 608 Studios. The encounter and the two singles unveiled from it before hand in the shapes of You’re Going Nowhere and Hold On Pain Ends sparked yet another influx of attention and interest. From there and later that year Under Paris ventured into the studio to record Transitions, releasing its first single Midwest Winters as a flavoursome teaser soon after. It lured in another dose of keen interest, which the band having signed with Imminence Records this past February, hope to exploit with the worldwide release of their new album.

IR032     Release and band prey on the senses immediately through opener Shallow Graves as irritant riffs and venomous vocal growls collude with vicious beats and bestial bass tone from the off. It is an imposing and gripping start which relaxes a touch as melodic toxicity and rampant rhythms erupt and smother ears in familiar yet fresh metalcore hostility. The guitars of Jayden Serrano and Evan Morrow spin a web of sonic enterprise within their barbarous riffery, enticing and holding the imagination whilst rhythms and vocals create a hellacious trespass of the senses. It is a strong and consuming beginning to the album but a nagging doubt arises in thoughts during it too. The excellent caustic vocals of Michael “Thorr” Alexander unleash an impressive and enjoyable ferocious fury yet with a singularly inhospitable delivery which admittedly personal tastes wondered if they might fail to provide the diversity the album potentially would need. Hopes that there will be something to temper and contrast his imposing are swiftly realised by Under Paris with At War with Myself. Once again Alexander and the vicious side of the sound is a merciless single minded tempest but in no time finds itself bound in a spicy enterprise of guitar aligned to the excellent clean vocals of bassist Rylie Phillips. He has a warmth and catchiness in his tones which works perfectly with the expressive brutality of Alexander, the song musically matching their ferocious and melodic union in creative kind. The sinew swung beats of drummer Lucas Richards create a rugged yet understanding companion to both sides too as the band merges light and dark impressively, calm and violent textures bonding with captivating ease.

The album’s title track crawls with the senses next, Transitions an instant wall of bruising provocation but also soon veined by the magnetic voice of Phillips. The track grows into an ever twisting tempestuous exploit of emotion and sound, the guitars managing to flirt and scar ears with their invention whilst rhythmically the encounter reveals sheer brutal rapacity. Its hellacious but enthralling presence is matched by What’s the Big Deal About Alaska though the song lacks the incendiary spark of its predecessors. It does come dramatically alive though around midway when the band slips into an evocative and thoughtful passage of relative peace and intrigue away from the fierce bluster, though that subsequently returns in a bellow of greater infectiousness.

The very swift rage of Yoloswag#420 provides an inescapable contagion next, the viciousness coming with a virulent swing before descending into a corrosive bedlam of spite. Its brief assault is followed by the heavily engaging Midwest Winters. The song’s landscape is a turbulent terrain of heavily delivered rolling rhythms and sonic acidity, again under a murderous atmosphere cast by riffs, predatory basslines, and vocal fury. Across it though, fiery melodies and the clean tempting of Phillips, provide the light in the dark, for a union of extremes which need each other to work and in turn flourish impressively together.

Both Devil’s Trap and Too Far Gone hold ears and attention tightly, the first a web of jagged riffs, bass imagination, and tremendous crippling beats from Richards. As in all tracks unpredictability is given plenty of exposure but often elsewhere comes shadowed by the storm around and above it. Here though it is allowed the strongest clarity enhancing the drama and appeal of the experience. Its successor is simply a torrential ravaging of malevolence and emotive rancor aligned to a fascinating weave of sparkling melodies and harmonies, each an imposing magnificence whether presented alone or entwined.

A tantalising warm reprise of At War with Myself leads the listener into the explosively fearsome and seductive throes of closing track At Peace. Featuring The Color Morale vocalist Garret Rapp, the song brings all the impressive and flavoursome aspects of the album into one bewitching intrusive roar; contrasts and rigorous extremes embroiled in one emotionally fierce and sonically intensive fire. The best track on the album it ensures Under Paris end their confrontation with a gripping and lingering incitement.

Transitions is a thoroughly satisfying proposition. It does not always go as far in its imagination and boldness as it should and would be liked, meaning at times it fails to meet its potential but certainly the release shows Under Paris to be a band which should be locked into the radar and their album a regular proposal to embrace.

Transitions is available now via Imminence Records at most online stores and physically @ http://www.underparis.bigcartel.com

https://www.facebook.com/underparisband

RingMaster 01/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/