A.D.D. – Core

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It may be labelled as hard rock, but the roar of sound which escapes the craft and imagination of Chicago band A.D.D. is just as much metal and punk, and very often more so. It is a fiery and aggressive mix which makes the band’s second album Core, one of the most enjoyable slabs of voracious rock ‘n’ roll to be heard this year and most likely moving forward. It is a release which does not dramatically startle yet leaves ears and emotions seriously gripped and hungry. It is not an obvious classic encounter either yet can stand toe to toe with those which might be offered such label in creative tenacity and sheer pleasure. However you see and hear it though, Core is an encounter which does what all great rock albums do, leaves the listener breathless, adrenaline soaked, and highly excited.

Though still a young band A.D.D. (Analog Digital Disorder) are no strangers to attention and increasing acclaim. Their first album was been an eagerly devoured and purchased introduction on CD and download whilst live the quartet has only impressed and built a potent stature through shows with the likes of Korn, Chevelle, Halestorm, Sevendust, Alterbridge, and Buckcherry amongst many. Equally they have played and left events like Throttlefest, Summerfest, and WIIL Rockfest with success and praise soaking their wake. Now the band is ready to breach the broadest spotlights with Core, and such the impact on personal ears it is hard to see them losing any momentum in their ascent, indeed only accelerating it. Mixed by Tadpole (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down, Staind) and mastered by Grammy Award winner Trevor Sadler, the Pavement Entertainment released album hits the sweet spot straight away and never relinquishes its ultimate grip again.

I Regret sets things off in immense style, the track an instantly robust punch of rhythms and an aggressive snarl of riffs bound in spicy sonic tempting. There is grouchiness to its attitude, epitomised by the throaty growl of bass, and an instantly matching snarl to the voice and delivery of Matilda Moon (Margaret Young). Her vocals roar and soar with emotion and aggression across the song, simultaneously offering a warm and melodic vitriol which reminds of punk metallers Mongrel and their front lady Jessica Sierra, and indeed the song has a feel of their US compatriots but in openly individual ways. It is a mouth-watering opening to Core, melodies and harmonies as ripe and pungent as the more hostile elements of the outstanding encounter.

Print     The following Not My Way comes with a more even tempered but no less compelling presence. Moon and guitar embrace ears initially with expressive restraint before the track erupts with predatory riffs and heavy jabbing beats in a furious and highly flavoursome weave of sound. Part confrontation but more magnetic croon, the song captivates and tantalises with evolving adventure. The guitars of Dave Adams and Jeremy Sparta alone absorb an eager appetite but aligned to the pungent rhythms and Moon’s increasingly impressive tones, it is a mouth-watering trap for the imagination and passions.

Hear Me Now steps up next with muscles openly flexing in every swiping beat from Jason Delismon as aggression wraps every snarled syllable from Moon. Though it has a fuller melodic rock canvas to its thick bellow, there is still that metallic intensity and punkish roar at large, the track all the better for it, and something missing from Was My Life next. It should be noted not everyone will feel the same about the song, but for personal tastes it is one of two times where the album goes astray. Led by the vocals of Sparta, who right away we emphasize has an impressive voice and embraces the soft/hard rock balladry of the song with skill and inventive colour, the track simply breaks the flow and charge of the album with its soft hearted endeavour. It is a potent showing of another side to the band’s sound and songwriting but feels out of place in the surge of the release. It is a personal thing though and as the saying sort of goes, “it’s not them it’s me”.

Attention and emotions are flying and rigorously enthused again with the voracious Damn Thing, a rhythmic trap of a song with bracing and soaring melodies aligned to matching harmonies. Crossing a volatile landscape of ideation and aggressive sound, the guitars and Moon simply enthral across the song’s lively length. Their passion and invention helps build an anthemic incitement which is imposing and rewarding from start to finish whilst the closing snarl of the song just sends shivers and tingles down the spine, a reaction swiftly soothed by the melodic charm and warm caress of So The Pain. Vocally and lyrically emotive, and soaked in an angst lit aural embrace, the track blossoms a provocative web which brings whispers of one of the band’s influences, Heart, as well as more classic rock imagination through the guitars. The fade-out is disappointing but the song a fascinating and exciting encounter showing even more of the depths to A.D.D.

Nightmare is next and also explores a broader and calmer weave of melodic rock but comes littered with dramatic and inventive twists from guitars and vocals around a carnivorous spine of bass and drums, whilst its successor Nothing Left, sees the band turning back to the more recognisable hard and classic rock recipe but with a fiery and thrilling intent to its melody rich power ballad canvas. It also has a tempestuous air and agitated nature in riffs and rhythms which makes for an unpredictable and highly enjoyable proposal.

So Much is seeded from that classic bed of inspiration also but this time as with Was My Life, lies like a cuckoo in the cradle of the album despite also being a skilfully and impressively sculpted proposition. As the earlier song, others will devour it with greed and rightfully so, but for our tastes it finds barren ground and a want to dive into album closer Black to keep the exhilarating growl and tempest of Core in top gear. The closing song is a beast of a track, from vocals to riffs and rhythms to sonic toxicity, a predator of ears and emotions unafraid to add tangy spicily coated melodies and harmonies to its seduction. As it started, Core goes out on a pinnacle, finishing off nothing but lofty peaks to be honest, despite a couple of aberrations in our likes.

A.D.D. is a band poised to leap into the big time, if not with Core certainly sometime ahead, and with seriously thrilling albums like this already fuelling their rise, it would be stupid for anyone to wait.

Core is available now via Pavement Entertainment on CD @ http://official-a-d-d-store.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/a-d-d-core-cd and digitally on most online stores.

A.D.D. has upcoming live shows at…

Fri. Mar. 27th – Mojoes – Joliet, IL – HEADLINE CD Release show

Sat. Apr. 4th – Crazy Coyote – Burlington, IA

Sat. Apr. 11th – Freakster’s Roadhouse – HEADLINE – Pontiac, IL

Thu. April 16th – Nevin’s – HEADLINE – Plainfield, IL

Fri. Apr. 24th – On the Rox w/ Wayland – Jacksonville, IL

Thu. May 7th – Mojoes w/ Black Stone Cherry – Joliet, IL

Sun. May 10th – High Noon Saloon w/ Y&T – Madison, WI

Sat. June 5th – Metal Grill – Milwaukee, WI

Fri. July 17th – Rockfest – Cadott, WI

https://www.facebook.com/Analog.Digital.Disorder

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Surf City – Jekyll Island

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There are times when it is easy to get lost in a realm of fantasy, moments in life and indeed music when physically and mentally you can escape the hum drum and explore new landscapes. One such escape is the sultry adventure of Jekyll Island, the new and third album from New Zealand psychgazers Surf City. Basking in a sultry surf rock seeded climate wrapped in the summery smile of shoegaze and the sonic beauty of psyche rock, the release is a mesmeric lure for ears and imagination.

The successor to their acclaimed album We Knew It Was Not Going To Be Like This of 2013, Jekyll Island is a fascinating flight of sound and emotion. Songs again come soaked in the warm magnetic fuzziness which the band is becoming renowned for but equally feel more precisely sculpted and resourcefully rounded propositions. It is open growth and evolution in the Surf City songwriting but an emerging potency which defuses none of the band’s already rich and tantalising qualities; basically a maturity of existing prowess exploring fresh and vivaciously new adventure. Simply songs and album offer pure pop presented in summery embraces of charm and beauty.

The album is also an imposing grower on ears and passions, its early touches engaging and magnetic but continual exposure leads to anything from lustful rapture to lingering seduction. The first track though is an immediate enslavement of ears and emotions on its first ever touch. From its opening exotic web of percussive and sonic enticement, Beat The Summer Heat has imagination and appetite hooked; especially as from that opening shuffle a rhythmic contagion unleashes irresistible bait. Jabbing with their own individual swing, beats forge an addictive lure at the heart of the track, taking ears and pleasure by the hand as guitars swarm over their enticement with vivid colours and a lively shimmer. Vocally too Davin Stoddard is a beacon of warmth and magnetism, riding the contagion with radiance. The track is glorious, almost alone worth the cost of your ticket for the album’s compelling ride.

Surf City - Jekyll Island   There is no major drift in quality and temptation as the following Spec City takes over, it a song with a bubbling electro underbelly and a radiating surface of melodic and harmonic splendour. The song is a courtship of the senses, a My Bloody Valentine like caress making an unrelenting seduction as a Yo La Tengo like vibrancy brings livelier action to the romance. It is a tempting swiftly backed and taken into new explorations by Jekyll Island and the Psycosphere and in turn Hollow Veins. The first of the two is a fascinating mix of eighties new wave bred pop and nineties inspired psychedelic enterprise, but also littered with post punk hooks and a Happy Monday’s like devilry. The song is pure mesmerism and perfectly contrasted and complimented in tone by the darker rockier revelry of its successor. It romps through ears like a meeting of The Horrors and House Of Love engaged in a vintage surf rock revival, its touch and breath raw yet overwhelmingly seductive.

The guitars of Stoddard and Jamie Kennedy weave an infectious web of fuzz induced rock pop next in One Too Many Things, its twang offering a country whisper whilst its catchy tenacity has a Brit pop lilt to its tempting, whilst its successor What They Need expands the already potent variety within the album again. It opens with a droning tang of a sound you might expect from the band’s part of the world, a scuzz lined whiny lure which persists invitingly around the additional minimalistic yet weighty hug of sound filling its persuasion.

That constant tweaking of flavours has Leave Your Worries unveiling an anthemic infectiousness which plays like a the offspring of a union between The Mighty Lemon Drop, The Lightning Seeds, and Kitchens of Distinction, but as in all songs it emerges as unique to Surf City.

The delicious heavy bass seducing and just as enticing beats offered by Mike Ellis and Andy Frost at its start makes Indian Summer straight after, irresistible all on their own but infused with the melodic lustre of the guitars and the resonating touch of Stoddard’s vocals, it only proceeds to steal attention and the passions further. It is a charmer from start to finish, one carrying the right amount of mischief and excitement but an incitement which ultimately places the listener in a fulfilling and richly satisfying calm. That is a description suiting the whole of Jekyll Island to be honest, and especially the gorgeous pop of Thumbs Up which romps with ears and emotions next. Whether it is possible to ever write the perfect song is debateable but it is possible to come close and this is certainly a serious contender. Melodies reek of innocence yet are inflammatory on the ear whilst harmonies and rhythms simply engage in lustful and infection breeding temptation.

The album is brought to a just as thrilling end by firstly the more sober, in comparison to its predecessor, but raucously energetic dance of The End and lastly through the meditative glamour and brilliance of Jesus Elvis Coca Cola. Sixties kissed and soaked in aural sunshine, the track is a majestic sea of expressive harmonies and poetic melodies soaked in a wash of psychedelic humidity.

It is a transfixing end to an increasingly mouth-watering encounter. There is a great familiarity to Jekyll Island but only as a rich spice in the unique ambience and masterful imagination of Surf City. Psyche/shoegaze pop has rarely sounded better.

Jekyll Island is available via Fire Records now and digitally, on CD, and on black vinyl @ https://surfcitymusic.bandcamp.com/track/hollow-veins

https://www.facebook.com/killsurfcity

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Red Sky – Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi EP

 

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What can we tell you about Red Sky? Well he is a masked guitarist/rapper from Milan, creating a web of creative adventure and imaginative sound. From the founding of his solo project in 2011, he has released one album, one single, and three EPs, each earning increasing acclaim and attention. In the third of those latter propositions, the latest release, he has also revealed a simply fascinating and magnetic new direction in sound and intent. The Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi EP is a transfixing and compelling exploration which embraces the artist’s broadest landscape of imagination and flavour yet.

Red Sky initially began as an instrumental rock proposal and swiftly drew close attention with the Tra l’ombra e l’anima EP in 2011, awareness increasing with the release of debut album Origami the following year. The Origami RMX EP in 2013 kept the growing buzz around Red Sky going but revealed little of the new adventure and shift of intent to emerge in forthcoming songs and music. Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi is the witness to and evidence of the exciting evolution and change in the Red Sky’s invention. Its six adventurous incitements merge the instrumental rock essences which lit its predecessors with new stirring strands of electronic imagination and rap bred enterprise. It is a captivating union which offers an open familiarity in some ways but fresh invention throughout.

It all starts with Il Prezzo, a short and riveting piece of atmospheric sound and persuasion. The piece magnetically shimmers from its first endearing touch, stroking ears with increasing potency as electronic and guitar crafted radiance embrace the imagination with a sultry ambience. Spoken vocals add to the brewing drama, though being delivered in Italian leaves their narrative and emotion unknown for us less enabled linguists. It is an engrossing entrance though which is continued by the following tempting of Cadono Giù (Freestyle N.1). A symphonic whisper coats its start but swiftly the song is a lively romp of electronic revelry and feisty rock flames. Equipped with irresistible spicy hooks and flowing synth bred flights of warm enterprise, the track immediately has ears and feet involved, gripping the imagination just as potently with its subsequent agitated adventure. There is a feel of The Kennedy Soundtrack to parts of the song whilst its sonic weaves embrace rich melodic and gothic metal theatre and vivacity, and with the sparkling guitar imagination having a whisper of Squidhead to it, the track easily enthrals.

Front     Il Flauto floats in next, its opening flirty radiance skirted by darker shadows. It is a union which continues to court each other as the song develops, each aspect increasing in texture and depth as more instrumentation and creative intrigue gets involved. Vocals are also a prominent proposal within the track, their presence punchy and expressive within the thick melodic blaze around them. Rap and metal are no strangers in music and in the song they bring a recognisable offering yet within the maze of its fusion of imaginative symphonic and folk metal with classic and electro rock; everything takes on a whole new and invigorating adventure.

Next up is Neve which features the soaring tones of Ideogram vocalist Martina Ambruosi. It begins its rise with a sinister and cinematic melodic drama, keys providing a catchy and portentous coaxing that simply basks in emotion as a growing tapestry of sound and ideation blossoms around them. Red Sky and Ambruosi do not exactly duet in the song but entwine their vocal deliveries around that of the other, a highly flavoursome union matching the expressive and provocative music boiling up around them. Though not quite as gripping as its predecessor, the song is aural theatre impossible to tear away from.

A mellower croon of sound provides the mesmeric breath of Stelle, music and voice a warm hug on the senses as delicious strings and sparkling electronic endeavour provides visual colouring for the. The track entrances thoughts and appetite with sublime mastery before making way for the closing Finchè Morte Non Ci Separi, itself a fascination of diversely textured sound and exotic invention. Showing a worldly landscape which is constantly evolving through mysterious calms and raging symphonic blazes, the piece is as expansive as it is deeply intimate and an absorbing end to a thoroughly bewitching release.

Also featuring the scratching skills of Dj Zero Tx on certain songs, Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi is one of those encounters which take you by surprise and easily breed a keen hunger for more. The new twists in sound and experimentation from Red Sky have created an impressive exploit loaded with the potential of even greater creative emprises ahead.

The Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi EP is available now via Ronin Agency.

http://www.redsky.it/   http://www.facebook.com/redskyofficialpage

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Calling All Astronauts – Show Me Love

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If there is one band which persistently ignites a healthy dose of anticipation with their releases it is UK electro/alternative rock band Calling All Astronauts. Early singles set that template in regular motion but it was firmly drilled into place with the release of their debut album Post Modern Conspiracy in 2013; is it really that long ago? Time really does fly when you are enjoying yourself, and thick contentment is again an inescapable reaction to the band’s new single Show Me Love. Though a cover rather than an original, the London based trio once again light up ears and give pleasure a healthy workout with their distinctive Calling All Astronauts makeover to the Robin S dancefloor classic.

Previous EP Hands Up Who Wants To Die? as the album before it, reinforced the band’s presence and impressive sonic adventure last year, luring a new flock of hungry fans to their punk infused electro bred sound. Now ahead of their second album, the threesome of vocalist/programmer/producer David Bury, guitarist JJ, and new bassist Paul ‘Buzz Saw’ McCrudden, formerly of The Marionettes, are stirring up attention and appetites all over again.

Synths immediately tease and tantalise from the single’s first breath, an immediately spicy and magnetic invitation offered. As swiftly the pungent bass seduction of McCrudden pulsates away with an almost devilish manner, a thick tempting within a sparkling and emotive embrace of keys. Alongside and through their union the guitar of JJ weaves its own sonic tapestry of enterprise and provocative colour, and like the other strengths of the song take a recognisable encounter to new and intriguing areas.

As well as a new texture of sound, there is a darker reflective nature to the band’s version compared to the original, a more solemn yet vibrant character pushed by the rawer and ever pleasing expressive tones of Bury. This in turn is expanded by the immersive and evocative atmosphere cast by synths, whilst it all colludes to create one thoroughly captivating and satisfying proposition.

As much as there is always a hankering for something original from any band, Calling All Astronauts has turned a well-known song into something if not their own, definitely redressed as something distinct to them. Anticipation of the band’s forthcoming album was already brewing nicely but thanks to their new single and its tasty appetiser, it is now in full flight.

Show Me Love is available now via Supersonic Media @ https://www.7digital.com/artist/calling-all-astronauts/release/show-me-love?origin=480

http://www.callingallastronauts.com   https://www.facebook.com/CallingAllAstronauts

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/