Unrest – Grindcore

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If there is one perfect example of something doing and providing what it says on the tin then it has to be the debut album from US aggressive fury Unrest. Called Grindcore, the twelve track ravishment is the genre in full voracious assault, a vicious and hostile incitement as raw and uncompromising as it is virulently compelling. It and the band has a sound which is stripped bare of all unnecessary deceits, a proposal revealing the raw heart of the songs and inspirations breeding their fury and voice. It is an incendiary persuasion embracing caustic vocals and a primal passion, and one of the year’s mightiest insatiable roars so far.

The album has been one long awaited and highly anticipated offering, its origins going back to 2006 when vocalist/guitarist Steve Jansson and drummer Chris Grigg unhappy at the demise of Nasum, decided to try writing their own grindcore thickly inspired by said band. They soon enlisted friend and bassist Brooks Wilson and produced a horde of songs, played numerous live shows, and recorded their debut album in 2011. It was an offering never released, the band deciding it would need to be heavily recorded at some point in the future. Other projects and opportunities came up for members in the meantime, Grigg continuing with black metal band Woe which he founded in 2007, whilst Jansson and Wilson went on to found TrenchRot, Crypt Sermon, and Infiltrator. Last year the original mixes to the album were re-discovered and found to be usable. New vocals were recorded that summer, followed by the album’s new mixing, and now via Unspeakable Axe Records, Grindcore sees the cold light of day, and in return gives us a merciless snarl.

unrest cover     As soon as opener We’re Calling You Out unleashes its rage and sonic ire, thoughts of Nasum, as intended, surge forward, as do hints of bands like Napalm Death, but equally and continuing over the rest of the release, there are plenty of new essences and blistering invention which makes it so much more than a homage to its inspiration. The first song slips in on a piercing sonic lance of pain, threatening and gripping attention ready for its subsequent forty seconds or so of grindcore toxicity. All three members bruise ears in their individual ways, rhythms a hellacious onslaught whilst the guitar singes the senses. The infernal raging led by Jansson’s vocal squall continues into You Take and beyond, the second song battering ears with a muscular rhythmic intent from its first breath, inviting a carnivorous bassline and tone within the next, and casting a rabid assignation between it and the psyche thereafter. The bass grooving is pure predation, equalled by the furious scourge of guitar enterprise and its own grooved tempting, but ultimately the track is a malicious conquest of senses and emotions.

The seriously brutal Inaction, as well as the following grievous violation posing as Quit raises the ante and intensity of sound and pleasure. The first is a riveting tsunami of spite and rancor which merges sheer unbridled savagery and slow venomous stalking into one addictive raging. Its inhospitable hardcore tendencies only add to the gripping persuasion whilst its successor is simply bestial in tone and aggression, carrying a rancor which makes the brutality of its predecessor almost lightweight in comparison. Once more the trio toy with gait and ideation within an intensive tsunami, never deviating too far from its core rampage but bringing plenty to challenge expectations and ignite the imagination. The track flows straight into Protest Culture, though it is no simple continuation but an individual torrent of musical bad blood bred from the same inventive and instinctive grudge.

Through the tangy and provocative, almost doomy terrain of Faith Is A Hearse, the thrash/death tirade of Anything To Shock, and the swaggering violence of Nothing (That’s All You Have To Give), band and album uncage further creative adventure, merging new stirring flavours and spilling thicker antipathy across the individual grudges. Each offers a new twist in sound and invention within the album too whilst still flourishing in that Nasum inspired base camp, and all leave ears and appetite greedier, a hunger Identity In The Internet Age and Consumption feed with their respective blackened hardcore ravaging and thrash fuelled rabidity. Both are also virulently contagious as they bruise and scar the senses with their ruinous appetites.

The album comes to a formidable close via firstly the exhausting and sonically scalding False Brotherhood and lastly with the rhythmically addictive and antagonistically crabby Drown, and though neither quite matches what came before, both bring a fine slab of delicious nastiness to create a thoroughly enjoyable close.

There are some tracks upon Grindcore which hit the sweet spot more than others but all impress and prove the long wait for the album, indeed a release from Unrest, was really worth waiting for. Hopefully the band can remain an on-going provocation hereon in with more sounds bred in thrilling and pungent toxicity.

Grindcore is released on CD March 24th via Unspeakable Axe Records @  http://www.unspeakableaxerecords.com/purchase/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=66&products_id=240

https://www.facebook.com/unrestgrind

RingMaster 24/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Siriun – In Chaos We Trust

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It might have the title In Chaos We Trust but there is nothing random and bedlamic about the debut album from Brazilian progressive metallers Siriun. Certainly the release is a furious and blistering merging of varied creative winds within extreme metal but comes entwined in a superbly imaginative and inventive technical prowess across songwriting and sound. Recognisable essences and established flavours consort with fresh and invigorating ideation, the result one thrilling and thoroughly gripping proposition.

Siriun is the brainchild of Rio De Janeiro guitarist/vocalist Alexandre Castellan, a project formed in 2014 to give an avenue to his musical ideas and creative tenacity. It was a proposal he intended would also be enriched with the strongest creative heart and invention possible, an intent which led to the band line-up of long-time friend and bassist Hugo Machado, and the rhythmic tour-de-force that is drummer Kevin Talley (Six Feet Under, Daath, Feared, Suffocation, Devil Driver, BattleCross) alongside its creator. The subsequent outcome of the union is the hellacious and fascinating In Chaos We Trust, an album bringing the metal world another intensively striking and ferocious proposal from Brazil.

The album first embraces and ignites ears with Mass Control, a track swiftly luring strong attention through its opening wash of melodic endeavour and sonic enterprise alone. The guitar of Castellan virtually flirts with ears, coaxing and enticing before a consuming wall of rhythms pounce. The powerful beats of Talley bring intimidation and temptation whilst the snarling tones of Machado’s bass, though less intrusive, only adds to the emerging predatory nature of the track. It is an impressive start soon casting a just as magnetic storm of scarring riffs and rhythmic voracity. Castellan’s vocals bring their own caustic but also an alluring texture and enticing to the increasingly gripping encounter, their raw and pleasingly varied expression and colour immense within the expanding web of melodic and progressive exploration. At its and indeed the album’s heart, the encounter is a beast though, prowling and growling with almost malevolent aggression and emotion, but consistently baiting its animus with transfixing imagination alongside seriously skilful and anthemic enterprise.

Siriun Artwork 1    The following Infected is just as riveting and mighty, and again straight away holding ears and thoughts tight through the breath-taking craft of Talley courted by a potent acoustic caress of guitar. Of course skirting it all are shadows and a more hostile intent, one which is soon driving the great carnivorous tones of bass and the just as swiftly riled riffs. It is the contagious swings of Talley’s beats though forcibly leading the tempting, their devilry like a sinister and hostile carnival bringing Latin seeded percussive revelry into a courtship with hellish animosity. The track continues to twist and incite through every dramatic aspect, the fingers of Castellan manipulating strings for a fluid and enthralling tapestry of sonic and acoustic melodic captivation.

There is no dipping of adventure and craft, or in an already greedy appetite for the release, as both Spread of Hate and Cosmogenesis seize ears and the imagination. The first of the pair is a blistering fury of sound and attitude, but again reined a touch by the technical invention and skills of the trio, something you can attribute to all songs upon In Chaos We Trust. Ravenous and enthralling in equal measure, the song roars like a mix of Sepultura, Mudvayne, and Devildriver yet entwines its roar in a melodic exploration opening up a unique and mouth-watering adventure. Its successor is a brief instrumental, an acoustic flame within a cold and haunting ambience within which a seduction of electric guitar provides evocative light. It leads into the just as shadowed and initially emotionally imposing and portentous title track. Though that suggestive threat and darkness never leaves, the song soon explores a landscape of provocative melodies and imagination within that tempest in waiting. There is an increasing pressure though bred from bass and drums though, a weight which eventually breaks down resistance and explodes in an onslaught of thrash drawn riffery and death metal vitriol. Again though, it is a passing passage in a journey of a song, part of an evolution which never waits around too long in one train of thought and sound keeping ears and imagination enslaved.

Transmutation steps up next and another web is spun around senses and thoughts, another offering relishing the skills and invention of every band member. Talley has brought his most viciously creative endeavour to the release, perfectly supported by the rabid craft of Machado whilst Castellan vocally and especially in his guitar explorations, leads the listener through a roller coaster of enterprise and emotion with ideas which rarely leave ears less than engrossed even if in rare moments the fluidity of twists are not as polished as elsewhere. It is almost a clutching at straws though to try and temper the weight of the enthusiasm for the release, a ‘lust’ continuing through the emotive and physical turbulence of Transmutation. As uncompromising and venomous as it is engagingly colourful in exotic melodies, the song bellows with creative toxicity sparking once more a hunger for more.

It is a want immediately fed by the closing pair of Intent and Becoming Aware. Each explore yet new spices and exploratory endeavours in their ferocious bodies, the first brewing a waspish nagging in its riffery and a sultry climate around its winery of melodies and sonic intrusion. It all comes ruffled up by the muscular avalanche of Talley’s swings and the grouchiness of Machado’s bass whilst the closing track brings the album to a climactic end. Though it is arguably the least inventively inflammatory and breath-taking of all the tracks, it has ears ringing and thoughts contemplating ardour whilst hoping this union of three exceptional musicians is the first of many.

In Chaos We Trust is an exhilarating encounter, one managing to offer sounds and flavours which provide at times a very familiar canvas to leap upon but just as powerfully create a proposition that reeks of fresh invention and new adventure. Simply it is a mighty mix from a project with the potential to craft truly inspiring templates for progressive and extreme metal ahead.

In Chaos We Trust is available now via http://www.siriunband.com

https://www.facebook.com/siriunband

RingMaster 24/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/