Raketkanon – Florent

 

    Raketkanon

    Raketkanon is most likely a name still relatively or entirely unknown to the wider expanse of British ears and appetites, but a situation unlikely to remain the same after the release of the band’s debut UK single. Florent is sheer noise alchemy, an insatiable and ravenous temptation. It is also the first teaser for the band’s new album, a larger and easy to suspect no less potent proposition with the potential to make the Belgian band a new lustful passion for a great many across the UK.

Hailing from Ghent, Raketkanon (meaning Rocketcannon in Dutch) have a sound which launches itself on the senses with zeal, relish, and devilish invention. It is easy to offer comparisons to the likes of Melvins and Tomahawk upon the band’s music, yet it defies real tagging as equally essences can be found of nosier exploits like Kabul Golf Club, Butthole Surfers, and Coilguns. It is a proposition which more than likely will draw different ideas and references from different sets of ears, and a sound, alongside the band’s presence on stage, which has led to the release of the single on Jazz Life Records, the label of Blood Red Shoes. Laura-Mary Carter of the British band recently commented on Raketkanon, saying “After seeing their first London gig and being pinned to the back of the wall by the sheer force and insanity of them playing live, I knew we had to sign them to our label.

Feedback and sonic enticement make the opening lure, bait swiftly reinforced by a heavy rhythmic stroll and he discord kissed enterprise which springs from the intriguing start. Consisting of Jef Verbeeck, Pieter de Wilde, Lode Vlaeminck, and Pieter-Paul Devos, Raketkanon soon has ears and imagination immersed in their thick, unpredictable experimentation. Sludgy atmospheres collude with quietly psychotic textures whilst just as reserved droning comes to play with the senses. Each though is just a strand in the fascinating and incendiary tapestry of noise conjured by the band, post punk seeded bass and guitars aligning with rapid fire beats for a psyche twisted dance bound in a sultry and equally bedlamic synth cast seduction. Courted by the increasingly deranged delivery of vocalist Pieter-Paul Devos, the track is a bedlamic croon, a distorted and unhinged serenade sending shivers of joy across senses and imagination.

Florent is quite sensational, an insatiably and creatively irrational seduction which is not only frighteningly captivating but an irresistible temptation to the band’s forthcoming album RKTKN2#. Britain and the world is about to be seriously infected and after being tainted by Florent, it cannot come fast enough.

Florent is available on limited 7” white vinyl through Jazz Life Records from March 30th whilst RKTKN2# is released via KKK Records on April 13th.

http://www.raketkanon.com   http://raketkanon.bigcartel.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Raketkanon

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

False-Heads – Wear and Tear

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Proving that their impressive introduction in outstanding debut EP Tunnel Vision last year was no fluke, UK alternative/psyche rockers False-Heads now unveil its successor the Wear and Tear EP. In fact such its magnetic manner and devilish invention, the new release makes its predecessor feel like just an opening teaser to its glory, a rather tasty one for sure, but the prelude to the outstanding and masterful adventure now igniting the passions. Consisting of four attitude cored incitements of noise and psyche rock unafraid to weave in just as warped essences of pop, alternative rock and more, Wear and Tear is a confirmation and wake-up call to the creative might and potential of another seriously exciting band within the British music scene.

Hailing from the East London area, False-Heads is a band which needs little time to grab attention with their imagination gripping sound, swift evidence provided by EP opener Wrap Up. Its first breath comes with a spicy and fuzzy wind of persuasion and energy, a raw guitar courting of the ears soon backed as potently by a heavy and predatory bassline and crisply delivered beats. The trio of Luke Griffiths, Jake Elliott, and Daniel Delgaty have within the first seconds of the track, coaxed eager attention which only strengthens as the song relaxes into a cleaner climate of sound still driven by that initial throaty bass temptation and just as magnetic vocals. Now firmly into its stride, the song unveils a confident swagger but also an appetite to explore heavy rock riffery, stoner-esque grooving, and noise rock imagination, all teased with post punk like infectiousness. It is a fluid and unpredictable adventure keeping ears and thoughts on their toes and emotions high.

False-Heads-Wear-Tear-artwork-450x444  The thick flavours and enterprise fuelling the song continue into the grungier Twentynothing, a proposition opening with a Nirvana like enticing but soon evolving into an intimate design of melodic expression and melancholy wrapped rhythms. Any moment is just that in the passage of the song, and it swiftly moves into an embrace of a more Melvins meets Asylums like tenacity and imagination, though still circling that early magnetic grunge bred hook. As all the tracks there is a glint in its creative eye, a devilment which relishes teasing familiar spices and twisting them into fresh and infectious uniqueness.

The following Snatch is the same, a proposition drawing from recognisable flavourings but disfiguring them with ingenious revelry for something new and distinct to False-Heads. Persistently the band seems to be compared to The Pixies, not as obvious a reference for us until you hear this one song. It strolls along with a virulent swing and addictiveness which could easily be Frank Black composed, serenading with minimalistic charm and just the right amount of causticity to the guitars and dour monotony to the rhythms. Around it though, sounds and textures seduce and flare up, creating a web of intrigue and volatile enterprise which swiftly and inescapably inflames ears and the passions.

It is another sensational offering upon Wear and Tear leaving closing track Nothing In There some work to do to end the release on a similar height. It is fair to say it fails, but only just as it mesmerises the senses with its dark drone of sonic incitement. Like a post punk/shoe gaze proposal held in a post rock atmospheric embrace, the song is simultaneously cold and sultry with noise seduction and psyche rock provocation as open and riveting as the other textures mentioned. It is a fascinating and compelling end to an irresistible provocation of body and mind.

False-Heads left a lingering and convincing impression with their first EP a year ago but have more than overshadowed it with Wear and Tear. There are a few bands which trigger the deepest, intensive excitement in the grand landscape of emerging bands right now and of those that do, False-Heads stand to the fore.

The Wear and Tear EP is released March 23rd on Hi4Head Records and available at http://false-heads.bandcamp.com/album/wear-and-tear

https://www.facebook.com/FalseHeads

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Lupen Tooth – Strawberries & Cream

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Whether escaping a dank graveyard or bred within the toxic touch of a silvery full moon, Lupen Tooth is a proposition which once bitten by their horrorpunk ferocity, swiftly becomes a ravenous and lingering incitement. Certainly that is the case with the UK trio’s new EP Strawberries & Cream, five tales of corrupted flesh and demonic seductions making up a devilish and magnetic assault of punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll.

Hailing from Bristol, Lupen Tooth consists of bassist/vocalist Tommy Creep (also owner of indie label Graveyard Calling), guitarist Klum, and drummer Nick Naylor. Their sound seemingly draws on inspirations from the likes of Misfits, Crimson Ghosts, and Blitzkid but also recalls essences of older schooled punk rock which is in many ways where the band stands out from the horrorpunk crowd. Essences of bands like The Ramones and The Damned hint throughout their songs, never an over powering suggestiveness but colluding with the band’s own raw sound and horror fuelled invention to create something organically compelling. It starts from the opening track of Strawberries & Cream, increasing in potency and enticement with each passing song until ears, imagination, and psyche are infested and consumed.

a0506917967_2    Opener Coffin Pallor instantly leaps at ears with a muscular bassline, concussive beats, and abrasing riffs. It is an imposing entrance only given greater force by the dual vocal assault of Creep. Their tones are vibrant yet solemnly monotone, a great mix as cold as the air circulating the track’s narrative and as addictive as the anthemic drive of the song. The bestial bassline from Creep prowls and flirts deliciously with the sonic flames coming out of the strings of Klum’s guitar, whilst everything combined brings small thoughts of US punks The Panic Beats.

The harsher heavy metal breeding of Moonlight Fury erupts next. Driven by the wolf inside, the song is soon a volatile punk stomp creating a dirty and magnetic stalking of ears. It does not quite have the spark of its predecessor for personal tastes, but still tears through the senses with a pleasing abrasiveness which triggers greater passion once it dips into a primal passage of bass sculpted and sonically infused preying of the senses. The track keeps the earlier installed appetite for the release fully engaged before Zombie Doll crowds and preys on the listener with its earthy riffs and brooding rhythms. It also just misses the final factor compared to the first and following songs in majorly igniting emotions but with a great caustic lure of vocals amidst stabbing beats it has satisfaction full.

The EP kicks up another gear with Bury You Deep, a psychotic romance engaging the imagination with a torrent of ear scrubbing riffery and an intimidatingly predatory bassline. Its chorus is simplicity but inescapably addictive, Misfits again coming to mind, whilst the rhythmic and sonic threat of the encounter worries and bruises the senses with horrorpunk rabidity.

The release ends as it started with another gripping peak and a track centred round a death inviting casket. The Coffin Is My Home which from its initial minimalistic vocal and guitar coaxing becomes a snarling and fiercely simmering rage of hostility and creative predation. It is a thoroughly thrilling enticement, with a prime hook within the verses which reminds of a well known classic punk offering but so far has irritatingly defied recognition. Maybe it is our imagination but nevertheless it only adds to the bewitching bait on offer from the best track on the EP.

There is no sweetness with Strawberries & Cream it is fair to say but plenty of mouth-watering and highly enjoyable horrorpunk bloodlust. Lupen Tooth is not a band to provide seducing flights of melodic beauty or thought involving technical intrigues, but for raw and honest, not forgetting instinctively exciting hell bred rock ‘n’ roll, they are a great soundtrack to your nightmares and horrific deeds.

The Strawberries & Cream EP is available now digitally and in various CD packs @ http://lupentooth.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/lupentooth

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Senton Bombs – Phantom High

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If there is one thing predictable about UK rockers The Senton Bombs, it is that they will persistently offer feisty dirt encrusted, punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll. You can always assume a fresh fiery breath driving each and every offering unleashed by the Blackpool hailing quartet too. It has so far been that way since the band’s first album, Sweet Chin Music of 2009, and it continues with new EP Phantom High. Consisting of five diverse songs all bred from punk ‘n’ roll aggression and carrying a hard rock swagger, the encounter is quite simply an attitude loaded stomp of raw and feverishly flavoursome rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in 2004, The Senton Bombs has been a regular draw of praise and increasing attention thanks to their passion driven live performances and trio of albums, of which Chapter Zero in 2013, brought the thickest wave of acclaim yet. You know what you are going to get with the band; sounds and songs which devour the energy out of the body and feed the instinctive rocker in us all, but equally each of their releases to date has pushed the band’s music and invention in bold strides and ahead of the band’s fourth album later this year, Phantom High is exactly the same. It suggests a new strength of diversity emerging in their songwriting but similarly an even more potent roar and snarl of the rock incitement which sets them apart from most.

The EP opens with its title track, and from the initial sonic scythe of sound, swiftly has ears, feet, and emotions engaged in its adrenaline soaked charge. Vocalist Joey Class uncages his recognisable and alluring tones almost as soon as riffs rub invitingly on ears and rhythms jab with eager intent. Guitarists Damien Kage and Johnny Gibbons proceed to weave a bait of aggressive riffery and spicy enterprise as the track continues its contagious stomp, a solo especially tangy on the ear, whilst drummer Scott Mason and the bass lines of Class sculpt a frame to it all which is anthemic as the roar of the song itself.

10520105_10153295061197281_6683385127408093904_nThe track is an irresistible persuasion and straight away matched by the similarly outstanding Lights Over Phoenix. Whereas the first song was a riot of dirty hard rock and aggressive punk tenacity, the first single from the EP is a more pop punk seeded infection. Small but potently coaxing riffs are aligned to the equally mellower delivery of Class’ sandy tones, a tempting entrance which instantly has ears keen and toes tapping. Bass and beats need little prompting to add their punchy contributions soon after whilst the guitars flame and entice with gripping eagerness and temptation. A more restrained but no less addictive romp to the first, the track strides with unbridled infectiousness and tantalising enterprise creating an encounter sounding vaguely like a mix of Turbonegro and Hagfish, but ultimately all Senton Bombs.

   Black Chariot slows the energies down if not the enthusiasm for the release next. It is a blues rock spawned prowl, employing more classic and southern rock flavouring than anything they have bred before. The vocals are impressive, cleaner and clearer than those usually offered by Class and just as compelling, and  easy to hope they are used more ahead, but in tandem with the dirtier delivery.

The excellent croon of a song allows a breath to be taken by the listener too, enabling a restocking of energy before Passions of the Passive Aggressive unveils its own blues rock inspired bellow of aggressive and chest thumping, belligerent rock ‘n’ roll. Actually the song does not really explode at any point but through its taunting stalking of ears and urgent eruptions of intensity and scorching voracity, it again has limbs, neck muscles, and emotions inflamed.

Phantom High is finished off by the excellent Surf 6-66, again hard and classic rock thrust into incendiary punk ferocity. Think The Ramones embroiled with Mötley Crüe and you get an inkling of the lingering devilry bringing it all to a mighty close. The excellent song epitomises the EP as a whole, The Senton Bombs sound we have come to eagerly devour navigating new variety and insatiably captivating waters.

Phantom High is not a stop gap release before the band’s new album but a massive teaser of bigger and bolder things to come from the band giving further evidence that The Senton Bombs are one of those shaping a new heyday for British rock ‘n roll.

Phantom High is available from March 23rd via Holier Than Thou Records

http://www.sentonbombs.com/bio   https://www.facebook.com/thesentonbombs

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

https://holierthanthourecords.bandcamp.com/track/lights-over-phoenix

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Sums – Start At The Finish

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Not so much rising from the ashes of 90’s indie chart topping band Smaller but an evolution of, Liverpool band The Sums is one of those proposals which suddenly swoops on the unsuspecting to unveil one captivating proposition. Certainly that is the situation for us, though for those in the know and fans of their previous guise, the band and its striking presence will be no surprise. What is the same for everyone is the impressive and compelling arrival of new album Start At The Finish on ears and imagination. Consisting of thirteen pop rock offerings weaving flavours from the past decades into tantalising new infections, the bands second full-length is one stomp of melodic and creative magnetism.

The quartet as said emerged from Smaller, a band making a potent contribution to the UK Brit pop scene and whose Badly Badly is listed as one of Noel Gallagher’s all-time favourite albums. Fronted by singer songwriter Peter ‘Digsy’ Deary, the band hit problems from that successful release when their label folded before its successor could be released, an encounter never seeing the light of day. The band continued with various line-up changes marking the years, until in 2005 Digsy and bassist Chris Mullin decided to bring the band to a close and re-emerge as The Sums with a new creative direction in tow. The band had just recorded a new collection of songs showing this evolution in sound so the time was right to regroup and change the band name. First album If Only…,after early demo Treat Your Victim was the first major result of the move, a very well-received offering lighting potent attention the band’s way.

It was in hindsight just the base and teaser to bigger enthralling things, specifically the eagerly awaited Start at the Finish. It is an album which from beginning to end has ears and energies engrossed and at times really ignites a blaze of passion for its almost mischievous enterprise. One such moment comes in the tempting shape of the album’s opener and title track. Start At The Finish opens on a cosmic dazzle of sound, relaxing for an acoustic strum to caress ears and then unleashing a firmer compelling embrace led by a slow heavy bass stroll and exotic melodic radiance. This turn of events is soon joined by the distinct vocal tones of Digsy, his voice a perfect mix of raw touches and pure infectiousness brought with almost side show barker like mastery. The song itself continues to croon and slowly wrap around the senses, its burst of rock intensity as enthralling as the shadow kissed smouldering guiding its persuasion. The track is glorious, addictive, and an inescapable coaxing into the album.

10806237_10154758298730526_1475424889455222043_n     A bluesy touch of guitar opens up the following Cliché, making way for a gentler acoustic hug and the entry of the vocals, before returning straight after with even brighter flames. The rhythms of Mullin and drummer Chris Campbell provide a firm if undemanding frame for the sonic enterprise cast by the guitars of Lee Watson and Digsy, but all together it makes for a highly enjoyable blues rock seeded stomp matched in success by Come On Down right after. Catchy from its first breath, with a chorus impossible not to lend your own tones to, the song has a strong Beatle-esque whisper to its melodies and harmonies and a riveting swing to its whole body, though it and its predecessor are shaded out just a little by the excellent I Won’t which follows them. A little pop punk, a little beat, and completely contagious, the song romps with a great mix of muscular reserve and addictive energy. It is swiftly an irresistible prospect but digs deeper with its flashes of warped devilry as hooks explode across it with discord lit tempting.

Nobody makes an enjoyable companion next, its opening balladry leading into a highly agreeable, and of course should be assumed catchy, rock folk/pop punk forged stroll with a hint of Weezer to it. It is immediately overshadowed though by Get Out Clause. Its opening clockwork rhythmic enticing, (Trumpton anybody?), is the prelude to an outstanding punk ‘n’ roll stamping, though again one cast upon a melodically smouldering and controlled incitement. It has a great snarl to it too, vocally and inventively, whilst its imagination provides a web of fascination employing essences of post punk, new wave, and folk rock.

The reflective and intriguing charm of It’s You cups ears in a sultry haze initially before expelling blues rock winds whilst its successor I’m Not Very Good has a certain XTC elegance and imagination to its captivation. It is also flavoured by the guest vocals of Dave McCabe of the Zutons, who provides a great sandy growl of a passage mid-way and helps turn a great blues veined melodic rock song into another peak of Start At the Finish.

Every song comes with great unpredictability and surprising attention grabbing twists and hooks, this no exception with its guitar and vocal crafted devilry or indeed neither the melodic flight that is Hose Me Dow. Providing its mesmeric croon with almost carnival like quicksteps and harmonic smooches, it is an adventure of ideation and sound again bringing something extra to the character of the album and helping it stand apart from the crowd.

Vegetable is another track which easily grips ears and thoughts if not quite lighting their emotions as dramatically as other tracks, whilst Maybe One Day is a bewitching serenade with a great feel of Holly Johnson meets The Killers to it, and a song which only blossoms to greater heights with its orchestral infused climax.

The album is brought to a close by firstly the tangy, acoustic and atmospherically rich croon of Bad Move and lastly the smoky blues treat of Something’s Afoot. The final song enters on a brilliant deranged vocal and rhythm shuffle and proceeds to coat its length with sonic liquor and melodic spicing set ablaze by the dusty growls of Digsy and a juicy guitar solo.

Produced by Mullin & Pat O’Shaughnessy, and themed by tales of ‘achieving whilst being the underdog’, Start At the Finish just lights up and involves ears and imagination for its whole length. It might not become your most favourite album this year, though it just as easily could, but it and The Sums will be one you return to time and time again with eager haste.

Start At the Finish is available now @ http://thesums.net/store/

https://www.facebook.com/TheSumsofficial/

RingMaster 21/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Oh Captive – Two Mirrors

Oh Captive Online Promo shot

It is hard to supress a roar of frustration and disappointment when after enjoying a new and thrilling encounter from a band with all the tools and sounds to be a major presence in British alternative rock, they announce ‘on the eve’ of its unveiling they are to be no more. That is what has happened with Bristol quartet Oh Captive. Just a couple or so weeks before new EP Two Mirrors is released to light up ears and appetites, the band announced it had called it a day, though it might emerge to be more an internal evolution resulting in a name change and new direction rather than a full departure. Time will tell but whatever the outcome, they leave behind two impressive releases and a collection of vibrant and inventive songs, their latest the most captivating yet.

Formed in 2012, Oh Captive swiftly lit their local music scene and subsequently set about the whole UK scene with their energetic live presence, playing with the likes of Sonic Boom Six, UK Subs, Straight Lines, Max Raptor, Sharks, Blitz Kids, I Divide, Fighting With Wire, and Scholars along the way. Their sound has drawn comparisons to the likes of Biffy Clyro and Twin Atlantic, open and potent spices in the band’s debut EP Advance Creature, which was released in the March of 2013. It was a stirring and dynamic offering rippling with a potential which has been realised with sizeable success within Two Mirrors. The past year has seen Oh Captive supporting the likes of Marmozets and Arcane Roots, and make highly successful appearances at festivals such as Leopalooza and New Age, whilst media attention has grown as potently too. Now it may be over, but if so the band has gone out with a bang and ensured attention for their next exploits will be eagerly attentive.

Oh Captive - Cover Artwork   Two Mirrors opens with Recover, an instant ear grabbing proposition as vocalist Tim Kelly and a tangy rub of guitar combine a minimalistic but highly tempting bait to bring the song into view. It is not long before the heavy throated bassline of Tom Hitchins and the punchy beats of drummer Chris Hill leap in, accompanied by sonic flames cast by the guitars of Curtis King and Kelly. Immediately there is a drama to song and sound, light and dark textures colluding in an imposing but inviting web. Settling down a little for the continuation of the narrative from Kelly, the song increases its lure as it builds to energetic crescendos and an anthemic chorus. There are no major surprises in the melody soaked track but there is a bold invention to match its gait, which leaves expectations and predictability absent protagonists in the outstanding encounter.

The impressive start is backed with similar strength by Motion / No Motion. The second song is a rhythmically raucous stomp from its first breath with Hitchins offering a magnetic lure of a bassline. It is a dark coaxing surrounded by the concussive stick ability of Hill, a thick drawing of attention never wavering even as they are immersed in the sonic and melodic blaze of the guitars and the ever impressing tones of Kelly. There is something missing compared to its predecessor though, a small element just stopping it drawing the lustier satisfaction bred by Recover, but nevertheless the song has feet and imagination leaping in tandem with its resourceful enterprise.

Live Fast Don’t Last explores more of a croon for its creative shape and emotive intensity next. It has a slower flow and a more immersive canvas than the last songs with melodic tenacity and evocative expression from the vocals providing a deeper reflective colour and emotion to the encounter. It smoulders and tempts pleasingly as it shows another side and depth to the band’s songwriting and its creative realisation, though again cannot quite emulate the success of the first track and indeed its successor.

The EP’s title track brings it all to a lively and impressive close. Two Mirrors bounds along with another invitingly dark bassline aligned to eagerly swung beats, whilst their union is drenched in an anthemic energy and charm which the band seems to conjure at ease. Veined by richly enticing and tenacious guitar craft, the song makes a pungent end to a fine and enthralling release. If this is to be the end of Oh Captive, song and EP has seen them go out on a high and will leave fans saddened and newcomers kicking themselves for not discovering their promise and quality before.

The Two Mirrors EP is available from March 23rd through all digital outlets.

https://www.facebook.com/ohcaptive

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/