Train Arrival – Dramatic Existence

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An engrossing proposition for ears and imagination, it is fair to say that Russian band Train Arrival has given one impressive introduction to itself through debut album Dramatic Existence. Oozing creative theatre as striking and potent as the technical craft bringing it to life, the eight track encounter is a riveting adventure of instrumental progressive metal. To that cinematic canvas though, there are also inventive weaves of djent voracity, symphonic ambiences, and oriental and Eastern beauty captivating the senses. It makes for one mouth-watering offering, one not lacking either familiarity or fresh invention, but ultimately providing a thoroughly enjoyable and imaginative emprise of sound and intent.

Train Arrival is the solo project of Krasnodar composer and guitarist Max Ben and that is about all we can reveal about the talented artist. Then again Dramatic Existence does all the talking starting straight away with opener History. A lone melancholic guitar melody wraps around ears first, its sweet tone soon joined by darker caresses and a classical air. It is a gentle and captivating start, immersing senses and thoughts with great potency as keys and a symphonic breeze brings new warmth and expression to a by now rhythmically bold proposal. As becomes a constant success across the release, the imagination is already conjuring a landscape of peace and beauty echoing the dramas and turbulence of past times. The track as all subsequent songs is an aural paint box for thoughts, inviting interpretations addition to the piece’s own suggestiveness, and finding new twists with every listen.

The following Returning takes the listener into a far more aggressive and agitated climate, but equally as tempting and inviting. Rhythms cast a web of intimidation whilst jagged stabs of guitar only accentuate the danger and imposing presence of the new soundscape. A djent bred examination shows its first grouchy signs whilst keys again cast an immersive embrace over the volatile heart of the track. It is a gripping and skilful theatre of sound and invention from Ben, every second of its six minutes providing persistent magnetism, the same which is easily said about all tracks and immediately evidenced by Theatre Of War. The outstanding third track does not enter with the hostility its title might suggest, in fact is less forceful than its predecessor in many ways, but offers drama and epic grandeur aligned to intimate aggression for one transfixing exploit. Again ragged djent persuasion colludes with elegant and immersive symphonic arrangements courted by emotionally colourful keys, whilst mystique and melodic hues of the Oriental with far reaching Eastern spices bring their intrigue to track and ears as the listener is taken again on their travels musically and mentally.

There is an underlying fatality to the track though and its aftermath is echoed in Devastation next, its colder air a telling introduction though soon succumbing to another tempestuous climate, sculpted imaginatively and powerfully by the guitar skills and keys crafted adventure of Ben. To that technical prowess there is a creative resourcefulness too which makes this and all pieces a fluid and tenacious theatre of sound and expression. The track has thoughts and emotions instantly and firmly involved, their premises uniting with the artist for another peak of the already highly impressing album.

Majesty just about sums up the air and presence of the next song, keys dancing provocatively over ears with an endearing renaissance charm before rhythms and riffs bring a creative turmoil to the expanding adventure. Predatory shadows and sounds stalk the melodic flaming of guitar and the bewitching radiance of keys, each of their twists bringing striking textures, creative hues, and sheer mesmeric enterprise best described as, yes majestic.

The ten minutes epic temptation of Badlands is next, provocative balladry and stormy climates colliding and entwining for another spellbinding offering which is simultaneously seductive and fiercely erosive on the senses. Possibly a touch overlong, though there is never a point where attention and appetite waivers, the track is a journey and adventure all on its own, and that is another impacting thing about Dramatic Existence, tracks work just as powerfully alone or as one act in the album’s whole sonic libretto. The song flows straight into the reflective embrace of Ashes Of Time, a serenade skirted by a carnivorous bass tone and raw edged riffs. It is the melodic lure of the song and guitar though which prevails in the increasingly volcanic atmosphere and intensity of the track, both assisted by the warm and emotive tides of the key’s invention.

   History Repeats brings it all to a fine, epilogue like end. The piece is maybe not the most impacting and gripping, relative to what came before, but provides a final richly satisfying and suggestive voice to the breath-taking exploit. It also provides one last slice of evidence to not only the impressive technical craft of Ben but his pleasing understanding and restraint in not over powering impressive songwriting with indulgent excesses of technique.

Dramatic Existence is a tremendous entrance by Ben and Train Arrival, progressive metal which simply ignites ears and imagination. The album might not be imposingly pushing progressive metal boundaries but it is giving them a damn good shaking as it thrills.

Dramatic Existence is available now @ https://trainarrival.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/TrainArrival

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Oceanic – City Of Glass

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Not sure exactly why but the depth and quality to the Israeli metal/rock scene always surprises, even despite covering numerous releases and artists from its creative well. You have the likes of Orphaned Land, Ferium, and Desert amongst a great many stirring up the world scene with their varied sounds, and from within the underground bands like Walkways making their mark. To the latter you can now add Oceanic, a band beginning to draw and earn potent responses to their presence and debut album, City Of Glass. Formed in 2009, the Tel Aviv quartet has inspired strong and increasing attention, especially over the past couple of years, and now with their first album nudging greater awareness, Oceanic has the potential to be another breaking into broader spotlights well beyond their homeland.

The band’s sound is melodic/alternative rock but with an appetite to throw in unique twists of progressive exploration and feisty imagination. As shown upon City Of Glass it makes for a fascinating and unpredictable proposition which can offer familiar essences in a fresh and often offbeat design. There are moments where things just confuse and miss their target but for the main, album and sound are one captivating tempting. The band itself has grown its stature and reputation in the Israel underground scene through appearances at events like Progstage 2012 and in supporting the likes of Pain of Salvation. Band experiences are not restricted to Oceanic alone either, bassist Or Lubianiker having toured as part of bands for Marty Friedman and Gus G whilst playing on Yossi Sassi’s album Desert Butterflies. The ex-Orphaned Land guitarist is now returning the favour by producing City Of Glass, and providing guest guitar, vocal, and bouzoukitar enterprise within certain songs on the release.

A Scanner Darkly starts things off and swiftly has ears and attention intrigued; it’s atmospheric opening inviting but also oppressively hazy. It is a tantalising mix veined by gentle melodic Oceanic - City of Glass - Front (sRGB)coaxing and soon joined by the gentle husky vocal reflections of guitarist Idan Liberman. The song gently immerses senses and imagination, broadening its intensity and provocative textures with smooth and warm persuasion. Before long its passion and energy breaks through the calm though, crisp beats and a dark bassline uniting with fiery enterprise from the guitars of Amir Manbar and Liberman, whilst the latter’s vocal tones also elevate in emotion and roaring vivacity. The song by now offers a mix of Palms, Bush, and in some ways System Of A Down, melodies and harmonies blooming in a fiercer cage of beats from Gal Shochet and throaty bass suggestiveness from Lubianiker. The song continues to ebb and flow in its intensity, increasingly impressing and exciting ears and imagination.

The following Wind Up In Barrel (Tribute To Walter) continues the strong start, raising the album’s game straight away with its rolling rhythmic start. A sudden drop into an emotive calm catches ears by surprise, losing that potent start quickly and dramatically wrong-footing, especially first time around, but it is soon embroiled in a brewing climatic of creative voracity and sonic agitation. Vocally too, Liberman seems to find a left field approach to his delivery which only adds to the riveting drama of the song. It takes time but the track eventually emerges as an inescapable seduction whetting the appetite further for album and the sultry embrace of South Of Heaven which follows. Its smouldering lures and charm is just the lead into more tempestuous but restrained musical and emotional progressive bred turbulence. It is a compelling encounter, essences of bands like Shinedown and Seether making glimpses in the magnetic presence of the song.

Both Enter and Clouds keep attention and enjoyment high, each again a mix of aggressive energies and reflecting tranquillity, never lingering in either too long and uniting them with craft and invention. Neither song creates new templates for rock ‘n’ roll it is fair to say, but both provide refreshing and thoroughly satisfying proposals, the first a melodic bellow with tangy sonic endeavour from the guitars and another rhythmic enticement to equally intimidate and excite. It only grows in pungent appeal and strength over time whilst its successor almost stalks ears with its heavy rhythmic resonance and predatory riffing, though again it is tempered by the strong vocal and guitar sculpted enterprise bringing warmth and light to the darker tones.

The brief and harmonically elegant Fish You Shouldn’t Eat (Part 1) slips in next, its musty warmth and sonic shimmer, a pleasing appetiser for the impact of These Countless Hours. This is a song which left ears and thoughts undecided and still does even though it is also a compelling puzzle. It starts off in impressive style, rugged beats and caustic tone a swiftly enthralling protagonist aided by similarly robust vocals. It continues to light ears until something strange happens, an exploration of invention emerges which sees music and vocals going in different directions. Both continue to work just not together for personal tastes, and we devour anything with a warped twist or avant-garde approach. It is almost as if singer and instruments have their own individual songs and are trying to unite them as one. The fact that it keeps luring ears back to try to make sense of it is a testament to what is going on in ideation just not its success.

We are back on an even keel with HMS Beagle, an intensive ballad of power and emotion with more roaring senses licking flames than a bushfire, and straight after through the melodic smooch of Eva The Cat Doesn’t Sleep, a song with a Poets Of the Fall whisper to its melodic and creative beauty. Vocally Liberman shows his full and strong range, occasionally showing an Andy Partridge like lilt, whilst guitars and rhythms combine in a graceful romance of accompanying sound.

The track Oceanic brings City Of Glass to an epic end, its meaty length and imaginative textures a rich croon of soaring vocals and provocative melodies wrapped in thick bass shadows and gripping beats. It has a latent aggression and underlying anger to it too, which only seems to intensify the emotion and sonic tempest smothering ears. It is a fine end to a great album. There are certainly moments which do not work as well as others but ultimately, City Of Glass is a dramatic and enthralling storm of melodic and alternative rock very easy to recommend all at least should check out.

City Of Glass is available now @ http://oceanicband.com/album/city-of-glass-full-album

https://www.facebook.com/OceanicBand

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Kahless Clone – An Endless Loop

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Atmospherically and emotionally shadowed, An Endless Loop is an immersive and magnetically evocative slice of post rock/dark metal which lures ears and imagination into a soundscape of intimidating possibilities and melancholic beauty. The four-track EP from The Kahless Clone is a mesmeric exploration for thoughts, a sonically cathartic and emotionally imposing journey casting fascinating and lingering shadows on the senses.

The debut release from the Chicago hailing instrumental band, it is a transfixing proposition which simmers tenaciously rather than sparks a blaze in ears and psyche, yet infests and submerges the listener in a constant tide of mood driven ambiences igniting the keenest appetite. The Kahless Clone itself is the brainchild of Novembers Doom guitarist Vito Marchese, who created the band as a portal for his instrumental songs. He enlisted the help of bassist Andy Bunk, keyboardist Ben Johnson, drummer Garry Naples, and Zach Libbe on electronics, programming etc. for the recording of An Endless Loop. Recorded with and mixed/mastered by Chris Wisco at Belle City Sound in Racine, WI, the EP takes the listener to emotion drenched worlds of encroaching shadows and sombre beauty, providing impacting flights through seductively oppressive soundscapes starting with opener Leave This Place With Me.

The first track slowly emerges from the lapping caresses of a dark cloaked tide, the sea a calming yet portentous coaxing aided by similarly imposing breaths of keys and adjoining piano. Soon after, the piece cradles ears in melodic hands, guitars adding to the elegant beauty as electronic rhythms are courted by a ravenously and primordially snarling bassline and texture. Intensity ebbs and flows across the absorbing landscape of the track, taking the emotion and energy of the guitars and rhythms with it and as much as ears and emotions are fed, the imagination is equalled fuelled for its own dark passages of exploration by the sounds and atmospheric smog.

   I Can Feel Them, but I Can’t Remember Them relaxes air and thoughts again next, its morose yet warm entrance a bewitching collusion between a stark post punk bassline and the ever 10471599_846588275397987_8113942985732759572_nemerging and evolving melodic invention of guitar and keys. The bass of Bunk is persistently compelling bait and a reality check within the ethereal embrace elsewhere. It all eventually ignites in an incendiary and fiery eruption of caustic riffs and flaming sonic enterprise, though still sublimely submerged in the overwhelming celestial swamp of sound, before settling back down for an intimate and wistful close to match the song’s entrance.

The final pair of tracks continue the masterful persuasion and adventure expressed by the EP so far, Everything You See is Gone providing a more heavily rhythmic growl and menace to the forlorn atmosphere around them. It is as if guitars and keys have a pent up angst, ripening and festering inside, unable to break the gripping web of beats and bass predation which itself increases in enmity and temptation. There has to be an outlet though, and that dark emotion finally erupts in a tempestuous fire of mournful sonic endeavour and rampant rhythmic agitation. It is a glorious and epic confrontation, the best track on the release involving and enthralling the listener body and soul.

The closing A Somber Reflection, well its label describes it perfectly though not the creative drama and melodic, almost jazz like invention which seduces from within. It is a masterful end to a superb introduction to The Kahless Clone; a band that greed is already hankering for more from. An Endless Loop is also a release which unveils new depths and secrets with every listen, new essences emerging from within its invasive climates bringing fresh adventures with every partaking of its evocative terrains. For fans of progressive/post rock and instrumental dark beauty, this is a must.

An Endless Loop is available now on CD and as a name your price download @ https://thekahlessclone.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheKahlessClone

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Deadworld – Self Titled EP

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Ever imagined what being clenched by the jaws of hell might be like? Well try the debut EP from US deathcore band Deadworld on for size. Their self-titled introduction may or may not exactly emulate the mouth of perpetual torment but it would certainly make the perfect soundtrack to its bestial and ravenous appetite. The four-track introduction to the New Jersey trio is a hellacious tempest of sound and psyche swarming enterprise. It is carnivorous, primal, and an increasingly compelling web of inventive malevolence and blackened raw seduction.

With three of its tracks recorded with Chris Fernandez, the song Astaroth recorded andengineered by guitarist/songwriter Jack Di Muro, and all mastered by Greg Pizzullo, the EP instantly goes for the jugular of body and psyche with opener Disgust. Well we say they go straight for the throat but initially the song emerges on a sonic boil of sound, one growing in weight and tension and subsequently exploding in a blaze of pestilential breath and guttural vocal toxicity. This is cradled in a furnace of riffs from  Di Muro and venomous rhythmic ferocity driven by the bass predation cast by Pete Buckley. The eruption settles into a savage stalking thereafter, the vocals of Emilio Alarcon a raw scourge shaped by excellent diversity striding purposefully alongside the corrosive riffery. It is the flirtatious shards of melodic and psychotic invention which spark and vein the tempest though which especially excite, their imaginative presence just the start of a creative adventure which does not impose upon and dilute the ravaging but certainly adds a mystique and enthralling twist to its brutality.

The excellent first taste of Deadworld is forcibly backed by Extremist next, though it is its successor Astaroth which steals the whole show. The second song is a lumbering prowling beast, its rhythmic punishing almost lightweight against the colossal intensity and rancor pervading the voice and heart of the encounter. As its sonic imagination and virulent hostility brings its vitriol to bear on the ears, you can almost feel it tearing down layer by layer the walls of psyche and senses, worming into the wounds and festering with toxic glee. It is nothing to the animus that is Astaroth though, the track one of those addictions you know you should flee but are lost to as soon as its claws sink into body and thought. As contagious as a plague and just as lingering, the track consumes and violates with sonic treachery and vocal maliciousness, already seizing the passions before condemning them to infernal addiction by unleashing a tempestuous fusion of diverse metal flavours and rabid intensity thereafter. The song lurches, lumbers, and charges with invention and jaundice, twisting it into unpredictable and contagious adventure.

The closing track, The Black Swan Event which features Bryan Martinez of Grimus, is a fury of sound and nature hell-bent on twisting the listener into a whimpering wreck through sheer creative animosity and a persistent savaging which again has no time to be predictable or content in feeding expectations. The song is still not majorly ground-breaking in its touch but certainly brings a fresh magnetism and ingenuity to its corruptive invention

The EP is a strong and potential drenched first offering from Deadworld, a band easy to assume is already making strong waves locally and within the US underground. Their EP has the promise and quality to lure even broader attention beyond those borders, so we all should expect to hear much more about Deadworld.

The Deadworld EP is available now via https://chugcore.bandcamp.com/album/deadworld-ep as a name your price download.

https://www.facebook.com/DeadWorldMusic

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Bricks – Here We Come

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     Here We Come is an album which might not be stretching existing boundaries or ideas of invention, indeed you would suggest it is not even trying to, but it is an encounter which introduces us to a potential soaked band with a sound which simply leaves satisfaction and enjoyment full. The release comes from Nebraska punks The Bricks and is receiving its broader unveiling courtesy of Raven Faith Records this month. Consisting of ten memorable if a little formulaic punk anthems, it is a proposition which leaves ears and attention wanting more of its old school punk rock.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Jimmy Hobbs, lead guitarist Chris Smith, bassist Kelly Turney, and drummer Mathew Lewis, The Bricks as mentioned has an old school feel to their raw rock ‘n’ roll but equally and in varying degrees infuse essences of oi, hardcore, and Street Punk amongst many spices, into its rebellious nature and sound. It is a faith based proposition which is not backwards in coming forward with the band’s personal emotions and praising but equally does not make it a focal point. This results in an offering from the Omaha quartet which will easily appeal to all punk fans and leave them with an appetite for more.

Recorded at Two Bird Dog Studio in Sioux City, Iowa, Here We Come opens up with an immediately delicious hook within the first few seconds of Just Like You. It has a ring of The Ramones to it which only adds to the instantly attentive hunger of ears and emotions. It is a familiarity which captivates with ease, continuing its potent lure as rhythms thump on the senses and the raw tones of Hobbs, backed by group shouts of the band, bellow engagingly. Like all good punk songs it is an easily accessible stomp for the listener’s body and voice, no demands or surprises being launched just magnetic punk revelry.

The strong start continues with the excellent Punk’s Not Dead, a song which stands toe to toe with ears like a mix of The Lurkers and Dead Kennedys given a healthy dose of US oi. Again the listener is enlisted within seconds to its boisterous persuasion, something all songs achieve with little defiance coming their way to be honest, and shown again straight after by Same Old Story. Not quite having the same spark as the first two, its character a little more dour, the track still provides an infectious and captivating proposal. Its midway slip into a more restrained and melodically aflame passage also reveals a stronger twist of invention adding to the enjoyable incitement.

Yahweh has a pop punk contagion to its otherwise simple and addictively persuasive offering, again a familiar tone soaking hook and riffs but once more leaving only highly satisfied ears and a greedier appetite. Whether in their next release or further down the line we will have the same feeling of satisfaction at being offered recognisable influences and flavours we will see, but right now it works a treat with its nostalgic charm. Proof again coming in the punchy Revolt and the masterfully anthemic Omaha Punks which follows. The first of the pair brings a more metallic essence to its riffs whilst vocals and rhythms lay down a great confrontation of punk persuasion, whilst its successor dips into the essences of The Clash and Angelic Upstarts for a predatory and gripping call to arms.

We Live flirts with whispers of ska and street punk next for an inescapably catchy coaxing of Rancid meets Social Distortion like tempting. As the last track, it easily has ears and feet engaged, and emotions basking in its old school and anthemically alluring intimacy. The same can be said about the Ramones bred Red White and True which strides resourcefully in next. Early touches have a more Clash feel but as the song hits its stride and chorus, it all courted by a great rhythmic antagonism and scything riffs, the NYC legends come to mind

The final pair of tracks ensures the listener is left energised and wanting more. Small Few is a middle finger defiance, driven by crisply jabbing beats aligned to a moody baseline and belligerent backing vocal calls, and inescapable addictive whilst the closing Some Day with less rigour lights ears with abrasing energy and inviting enterprise. More of a slow burner in persuasion compared to earlier songs, it still triggers pleasure fuelled reactions and brings a thoroughly enjoyable album to a strong close.

The Bricks openly wear their influences and passions in their music and it only rubs off on the listener. There are few new things to devour but plenty to provide one highly enjoyable encounter.

Here We Come is available now via http://www.ravenfaithrecords.com/#!product/prd1/3580537951/the-bricks-here-we-come

https://www.facebook.com/TheBricksOmaha

RingMaster 17/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Great Game – Self Titled

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It is a kaleidoscope of diverse sounds, a maze of unpredictable twists, and a tapestry of imagination bred adventure, but most of all, the self-titled album from The Great Game, is one captivating joy. Consisting of thirteen fascinating and invigorating celebrations of world bred sounds, the release is a delicious creative devilry which at times has the passions sighing in lustful pleasure and always has ears and imagination engrossed.

The band is the creation of Belgian composer and classical guitarist Mounzer Sarraf, and a union of musicians from across Europe, the Middle East, as well as North and South America. The band’s songs draw on the background and musical influences of each band member, entwining it all into exploits which defy precise description whilst creating aural travelogues which again embrace a myriad of flavours and styles in each individual creative emprise. Created from May 2014, when the full band came together for the first time, they make up one fun and mouth-watering introduction to The Great Game. Now released as a free download to “give as many people as possible the chance to get to know the music”, the band’s album is a fascinating and thrilling entrance by The Great Game.

The album opens with Science, and instantly has attention in its grasp with its opening electro like dance. It is a keen enticement which continues to coax ears as a warm caress of brass and the magnetic lure of rhythms unite with the instantly likeable tones of vocalist David Hastings. Its straight forward start is soon showing signs of unpredictability, warped essences teases in the background of Sarraf’s guitar enterprise and the continuing lively shimmer of Paul Chamberlain’s accordion which set it all off. Evolving through a blend of funk, jazz, and worldly sounds, to name just three of the textures, the song forcibly bewitches before making way for the rawer rock of Religionism. Crisp jabs from drummer Bruno Meeus and an understated but vocal bassline from the strings of Manuel Saez Canton shadow the scuzzier touch of Sarraf’s guitar. It is a tempting start if lacking the spark of its predecessor, but takes little time in welcoming flames of sax from Martin Fell and an animated stride into an emerging gypsy punk like proposal. Melodies and vocal causticity combine as a mellower rock croon also breaks out, it all again combining for a fluid and intriguing, not forgetting enjoyable encounter.

The Turning Of The Wheel Of Dhamma steps up next, its jazzy swing and rhythms a new twist in the album’s scenery. Vocally there is an intoxicated lilt whilst the guest trombone of César CD CoverRalleyguieb and trumpet of Jimi Garcia croon with melancholic expression within a smoky atmosphere. That sombreness is a deceit though, a creative smile and brass vivacity wrapping its charm around ears with an almost mischievous glint in their melodic eye. It is a bewitching offering, if one not quite holding its grip in the livelier finale, and matched by the folkish embrace of Television straight after. Featuring the lead vocals of Inbal Rosenblat, the entrancing song moves from a gentle sway into an energetic shuffle, ignited further by great and slightly psychotic backing vocals.

Another peak is hit with Bipolaroid next, the track initially a grunge seeded proposition bringing a feel of Tool to ears, which suddenly drifts into a second long quiet before returning with a psychotic look on its creative invention. It still roars with that grizzly rock breath and attitude but is soon discovering an agitation in its rhythms and a bedlamic character to its devilry, especially in the guitars and Fell’s blazing sax calls. Thoughts of French band Toumaï spring to mind at this point, the track an ingenious web of slightly disturbed twists and that fiery rock roar, vocally and musically.

Calm returns with the sultry Elhechizo De Hoy next, a kiss of Parisian charm blessed by the returning mesmeric vocals of Rosenblat alongside the more dour but as alluring tones of Hastings. Its endearing melodic flame brings a smile to ears and emotions whilst the fuzzier Poetry in Motion sparks another slither of greed in the appetite with its fusion of funk, reggae, and progressive pop. Featuring the also captivating voice of Medina Whiteman, the track dances with body and emotions, offering a flavoursome seventies tang to its appealing vivacity. Both songs are like melodic magnets and matched by the Eastern European spun revelry that is Hungarian Dream. Carrying a whisper of Les Négresses Vertes to its spicy melodies and especially its robust gypsy swing, the song transfixes ears and imagination whilst setting down another major moment in an already thrilling album.

There is that glimmer of real mischief in Pax Romana which sidles in next, guitar and bass a restrained devilment against the more solemn vocals. An essence of Yello also tints the swiftly riveting encounter though as the brass gently but vocally spread their heated expression, they spark a fiercer yet still controlled rock ‘n’ roll tenacity in the track’s heart. It like so many simply grips attention and emotions, though soon shaded a little by the sensational And The Blind Man Lead The Way. It opens with a reggae honed enticement, a UB40 like tempting, before digging into a fierce and raw rock sculpted bellow. It is the discord which flirts with vocals and hooks which steals the passions though, its angst fuelled derangement and the aligning raging, twisting a strong song into an inescapable favourite.

The enjoyable melodic and harmonic croon of Elemental Raven Storm comes next, another smouldering landscape of reflective melodies and brass colour over a bracing and unpredictable canvas of rhythms and enterprise. With a seriously compelling vocal climax, the track departs for Slave Magic, an enthralling mix of rock and blues colours. It might not quite light the flames as previous songs but burns away with craft and enticing endeavour to ensure ears and thoughts are fully satisfied.

Final track is The Great Game. Listed as a bonus CD track on our promo but included on the download version too, the closing is a solid shuffle of melodic and vocal invention combined with a jazzy pop crooning. It can be described as The Tom Tom Club meets Spandau Ballet in some ways, and again offers a pleasing companionship though not quite on the par with anything before it. Nevertheless it is a good end to a great release from a band already facing an eagerness to hear more from.

The Great Game has a sound with something for everyone, though arguably that might also be a hindrance in their appeal for some who want more stable offerings. Safe to say though that this is a band we will welcomingly be hearing a lot more of and easy to suspect with increasing clamours of acclaim and eagerness.

The Great Game is available now on CD and as a free download from http://www.the-great-game.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Great-Game/255555954610404

RingMaster 17/03/2-15

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

 

Zoner – Euharmonic Elevation

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Here we have an album which if in the mind to, you could pick at and suggest a few deficiencies but there is no escaping it is also one compelling and enjoyable proposition. The release in question is Euharmonic Elevation, the second album from rock/metal band Zoner. That is a simple description for a proposition with a sound which draws on a myriad of styles and flavours in its almost deranged invention. Release and band are a one of a kind, though each also draws on open inspirations which we will come to shortly. It all results in a collection of songs which hold few major surprises yet are one big and riveting surprise.

Zoner is the solo project of Antonis Demetriou, a musician and songwriter hailing from Nicosia, Cyprus. His music as mentioned is bred from a vast array of spices across numerous decades, and his band as described by Demetriou himself, “a rock/metal band with influences ranging from ‘ABBA to Zappa’ via all the VERY best in pop, rock, prog, punk, funk, disco, hard, heavy and thrash!” 2012 saw the release of debut album Spectraphonic Deviation, and now the artist returns with its successor, again a self-released, recorded, and produced offering, deserving of intrigued attention.

As opening track In the Name of Creativity establishes itself in ears, the first thing with captivates about the sound is its strange similarity to Bill Nelson, well his Red Noise guise certainly. Zoner is a more voracious and heavier proposition but from vocals to the sonic invention, there is a definite if coincidental feel of the ex-Be Bop Deluxe man to proceedings. The first track strides with muscular rhythms and stirring riffs from its initial sonic invitation, swiftly settling into a heavy rock and classic metal fusion. Vocally Demetriou is engaging and though he is arguably not a natural vocalist, any weaker moments are more than compensated by his inventive expression. The song itself continues on to explore new progressive and melodic textures, its technical intricacies as potent as the simplicity in which everything successfully fits together.

The enjoyable start is swiftly continued by the stronger lures of Hail Rock ‘n’ Roll, a rock ‘n’ pop romp living up to its title with hook laden riffs and an equally addictive bassline. Thumping beats only add to the contagious drama whilst the swing of the song forms the lead into a catchy chorus as flirtatious as the intrigue wrapped guitar work. Its finale of persistent title chants is irresistible and sets ears and imagination up nicely for the melodic elegance and croon of Patience of a Saint. A smouldering landscape of sonic enterprise, the song is an easily endearing encounter. The vocals are similarly mellow and it all makes for a partly mesmeric offering until it unlocks its heart of classic rock tenacity. It loses some of its grip from this point but still holds attention with unpredictable twists and keys sculpted tempting.

Politics of Modern Love steps in next and soon steals top honours on the album. The song makes a low key start, coaxing the listener gently before revealing a predatory prowl of riffs and dark toned vocals. It is a transfixing and thrilling turn, a post punk/ experimental adventure with a minimalistic air leading to a full blaze of striking imagination and creative exploration.

Both A Wasted Life and Are You the One keep ears and appetite satisfied, the first again bringing an eighties new wave/ post punk tempting to its theatrical hard rock canvas. As its predecessor, the track is riveting scenery of pungent sonic interplay and tenacious enterprise, an enthralling dance with recognisable flavours and expectations defeating invention. Its successor is equally unpredictable but does not have the same success with personal tastes. At times it is a stirring and invigorating exploit but in other moments, especially its start, leaves emotions flat. When it does hit the mark though, primarily when it unleashes its aggression, the song is a feisty enjoyment ending on a much loftier peak then where it started.

Early thoughts and expectations of The Sabbath Waltz arising from its name alone are soon confirmed by its muscular riffs and heavily landed rhythms. It is heavy metal with a sinister tang and melodic flaming, but again reaping spices from previous decade in its colourful web of sound and creative thought. Imposingly magnetic, the track crawls over senses and psyche, leaving another lingering lure easy to want to hear more of.

The closing Turning Point of No Return is an acoustic crafted ballad with Latin bred drama and character, another which misses our appetite but easy to see being a rich pleasure for others. It is a decent end to a release which keeps luring attention back its way. It has shortcomings; the production in certain areas shallow and not helping vocals at times but Demetriou himself has admitted that he is not really an engineer/producer but handles these tasks out of necessity. It cannot defuse the core quality, passion, and invention of the music and songs though. There are also other elements which at times you might wish for something different or for them to be tweaked but it is all relative to taste and again only increases the weight of the potential of the artist and sound, suggesting that given the chance to record with the right people and circumstances, Zoner might just have something very special lurking inside.

Euharmonic Elevation is available now on CD and across most digital stores.

http://www.zonermusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/zonermusic

RingMaster 17/03/2015

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