Asylums – Wet Dream Fanzine EP

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What do you get if you take a pinch of Supergrass, add it to an ounce of We Are The Physics, and then spice the mixture with a further splattering of Manic Street Preachers, Devo, and We Are Scientists? Well there is a good chance it will be something like the irresistible sound of and debut release from UK psyche poppers Asylums. There have been some startling entrances and introductions over the past months alone, but it is hard to remember many getting ears and emotions as excitable as the Wet Dream Fanzine EP manages in its three short, sharp slices of angular pop rock. The release is pure contagion but with a deranged invention and devilish imagination which reminds of a few and stands thoroughly unique in its character and temptation.

Asylums hails from Southend and have already picked at rapidly growing attention through their home made videos for the tracks making up the new EP; though having the songs bound together in one addictive package seems to make them grow in greater in persuasion and flirtation again. Live too the quartet of Luke Branch, Jazz Miell, Henry Tyler, and Michael Webster have been stirring up a buzz, a tour with The Vaselines and their own headlining enterprises luring in more and more appetites from fans and media alike. Now the Wet Dream Fanzine EP steps forward, with its title track released on the same day for the band’s new single, and there is a certainty that it is poised to shake up the UK indie rock scene for the better.

That new single opens up the release, Wet Dream Fanzine instantly laying down sonic smog of guitar enterprise which with pungent rhythms, has feet and thoughts immediately engaged and enthralled. The swing of the vocal delivery matches the warm stride and swagger of the song, everything a bouncy dance of mischievous persuasion with melodies and vocal harmonies soaked in creative devilment. There is no escaping the infectiousness of the encounter or its insatiable torrent of quirky and highly flavoursome hooks, it all unrelenting for the whole of the two and a half 10868149_320437288151046_8986672175115969600_nminutes the track takes to leap all over and inflame the passions.

There is no let-up in the devilry and quality either as the punk infused tenacity and urgency of The Death of Television takes over. An initial sonic spearing is the trigger to rebellious percussion and beats aligning to vocals just as sharply edged in their delivery. The song is soon a masterful stomp of creative agitation courted by a rhythmic and riff clad proposal which leaps around like bare feet on hot coals; the type of brilliance which made Baddies so essential when around. There is also an old school punk DIY feel to the EP and songs individually, which simply energises the second song and listener during its brief but addictive stomp.

The release closes with I’ve Seen Your Face In A Music Magazine. The third song combines the spicy grooving which lit up the first song with the more caustic attitude of the last track, merging it into a melodic and discord spiced wine of sound and invention. As the other songs, attitude exudes from every pore and note of the outstanding incitement, guitars toying with the imagination as rhythms jab with their own refined tempo on the senses and pop punk sparked vocals croon and roar with perpetual captivation.

It may be only one release but it is easy to suggest Asylums is the next big thing not only in but for British rock ‘n’ roll. The last time we were this excited was when…well privacy prevents details.

The Wet Dream Fanzine EP and single are available from February 23rd via the band’s own Cool Thing Records.

http://www.asylumsband.com/ / https://www.facebook.com/asylumsuk

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

The NX – Night Heaver

Photo Credit_ Robbie Shakeshaft Radcliffe Studios

Hitting the listener like a venomously swung sledgehammer in its first breath and proceeding to increase in hostility and brilliance from thereon in, Night Heaver simply blows thoughts and emotions away. The debut EP from British hard rock/metallers The NX, the four track onslaught is a dramatic and breath-taking introduction to a band sure to make a major impact on the UK music scene if their first trespass of the senses is any evidence.

Possibly the strength and quality of Night Heaver could be expected as The NX features former members of The Casino Brawl in its line-up; nothing is ever guaranteed though and the band swiftly show they are a unique and potential drenched proposition in their own right with the EP. Formed a few years ago in the north east of England, The NX soon bred a potent reputation and following as they proceeded to ignite venues with their live presence, which over the years has seen them play with the likes of The Chariot, This Is Hell, Enter Shikari, Bring Me The Horizon, Penknife Lovelife, Heights, Yashin, Job for A Cowboy, The Casino Brawl, Deaf Havana, Devil Sold His Soul amongst many more. Returning from a prolonged hiatus, the band unleashed their creative fury again from the end of 2013, a new line up and appetite to create more contagiously aggressive shows and sounds driving the band’s return, which has included so far successful tours with Funeral For A Friend, Hacktivist, and The Blackout. It has all added to a growing anticipation for the band’s debut EP, and there is no doubt that Night Heaver feeds all hopes and wants with ease whilst providing much more.

Lonnie Johnson’s Greatest Hit is an immediate raging bellow in the ears but equally a compelling web of heavy rock grooves and spicy hooks with a tempestuous rhythmic incitement. Quite swiftly like a blend of Every Time I Die, Turbonegro, and Cancer Bats with its own distinctive roar, the track takes no prisoners. The venomous vocal squalls of Warby Warburton intrude and entice with rasping causticity whilst the spicy hooks and scorching grooves of Mark Thirtle seduce and scar with equal tenacity. There is also great unpredictability to the track which shines out, PromoImagethe sudden twists and dips into intriguing and at times sinister invention, mouth-watering and ear catching.

It is a potent start but personally just an appetiser for bigger and better things to come, starting with The Great Unwashed. The second track immediately has a dirty air to its breath and opening riffs, an antagonistic nature which is urged in by the great bassline cast by Glen Holmes and spread with intensity through the swiftly following blaze of guitar punctured by the viciously swung beats of drummer Luke Walker. Every syllable spat from Warburton comes with a soaking of malice, a rancor matched by the rest of the track though it too is unafraid to offer catchy hooks and anthemic vocal calls against the clanging steely tone of the guitars and an overall merciless ferocity.

Yet another plateau is breached with the following The Day It Rained Forever, the opening grouchy coaxing of another irresistible bassline aligning to thumping beats for the first potent bait from the song. Soon though it is prowling and seducing as great cantankerous vocals, which initially hold a sobering air, add their interest in proceedings before they are venting with rich malevolence amidst a web of tangy grooves and psychotic rhythmic enterprise. As hardcore punk as it is metallically infused, the song is a glorious maelstrom which twists and turns as if it has the creative mania of St. Vitus Dance. Equipped with a closing noise fostered chorus which is impossible to leave alone, the track is one big reason for suspecting The NX will take their history to new major climes.

It is a suspicion done no harm by the other songs and especially the raging Let Sleeping Dogs Lie which brings the EP to an immense close. In a way opening in similar fashion to how its predecessor parted, the track brawls and violates the senses with another hardcore bred ferocity and corrosive inventiveness. Every riff scowl and hostile vocal expression exhausts and smothers the senses which in turn are invigorated by an incitement of hard rock melodies and spiky hooks which erupt and surge from time to time across the ever evolving provocation.

The song is an outstanding end to a tremendous release, the kind of debut fans were hoping and delivering a startling and thrilling adventure which declares The NX as a new inescapable force in British rock ‘n’ roll.

The Night Heaver EP is available from February 23rd on EP and digitally via Footloose Records and all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/thenxofficial

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Wolfetone – Silence Is Acquiescence

Wolfetone Online Promo Shot

A slow burner which takes time to getting going in some ways but emerges as a quite tasty slab of adventurous rock ‘n’ roll, Silence Is Acquiescence suggests the UK has another highly promising proposition in its rock scene under the rather cool name of Wolfetone. The release loudly hints that this is a band we should definitely be watching out for ahead, and with its rampant potential and increasingly persuasive songs, the band’s highly enjoyable debut album suggests why wait, a sentiment we can only concur with. It is a attention holding start to Wolfetone’s persuasion on a national spotlight, one with a few things needing ironing out ahead, but a collection of dynamic and exciting songs which do what all encounters should, leaves ears eager and satisfaction full.

Hailing from Northampton and Milton Keynes, Wolfetone has taken little time luring in eager support and attention through a live presence which has seen the band pick up highly favourable reviews and increasing acclaim whilst sharing stages with the likes of Heart of a Coward and Scholars. Their dynamic mix of alternative and melodic rock is bred with inspirations from bands like Billy Talent, Sikth, Protest The Hero, Foo Fighters, Reuben, and Hundred Reasons but as Silence Is Acquiescence shows, but it is a sound with its own emerging and distinct personality as shown by the album.

It opens up with Blame Culture, a track which personally did not grab as quickly or fully as following songs subsequently do with greater ease. In saying that once the big healthy bassline showed its lure and a potent wiry hook bound a flame of riffs, the track certainly had interest and appetite engaged. In hindsight it is a relatively low key song in comparison to many of its successors, but doing enough to tempt and certainly showing the strength of the band’s songwriting as well as their individual and united skills. The firm and punchy rhythms of Baz Woodsford and the increasingly alluring dark throated tones cast by Ollie Young’s bass make the strongest impression in a song which ultimately lacks the spark to ignite personal tastes. That success though is swiftly solved by the following Tanks, a vibrant and immediately striking slice of melodic rock veined by another spicy bassline and a potent blaze of enterprise from the guitars of Andy 11095_674690912650087_5503712840674927464_nSimmons and Dan Moloney. There is also a pop punk contagion to the stride and chorus of the encounter, offering a dynamism lacking in the last song which in turn feeds a new energy in the craft of the band. The vocals of Moloney also have a new lease of life, ably backed by the rest of the band in a three pronged harmonic adventure.

Born Human steps up next and is similarly loaded with an eager attitude and adventurous nature; the album in full swing now and providing all the proof as to why Wolfetone is beginning to stir up a buzz. The prime hook of the song is a tangy temptation too which steals the show from equally robust and tenacious elements within the seriously catchy proposition, whilst the changing gait of the song adds to the easily accessible but unpredictable nature of the track.

The feverish Enemies with its emotional intimacy and thumping heartbeat has ears and imagination greedily involved, a tempting reinforced by the excellent slip into melodic and harmonic calm with just an edge of angst. It is a passing breath though as the song is soon flexing creative and rhythmic muscle as hooks bite and melodies flame over the captivating frame of the song. Another highlight of the album, it is matched in success by the impassioned drama of Lost Boys, where guitars and voice create a colourful scenery of lively melodies and reflective emotion respectively, and the punkier exploits of Milton. An immediate favourite on the album, the track stands toe to toe with the listener through abrasing riffs and bracing rhythms whilst vocals croon and hooks spread infectious enterprise. Once more the bass Young feeds instinctive likes as if it already knows what the listener wants, his growling instrument the darker intimidation of a song which is prepared to brawl but would rather rigorously party with the listener.

Another highlight of Silence Is Acquiescence seduces straight away, The Constant a song which is happy either stirring up a tempest of sound and endeavour or laying warm melodic hands on the senses, and does both with invention. There is certainly a depth to the sound and songwriting of Wolfetone which is untapped but hinted at throughout the album, this song the strongest evidence of that further promise and potential which we will hopefully be exploring over future releases.

The album is finished by an acoustic version of Blame Culture, a wholly captivating offering with bewitching strings, but one which does emphasize the only issue with Silence Is Acquiescence, and that is the production on the vocals. Less prominent on the first couple of tracks but increasingly obvious as songs pass by, the excellent voice of Moloney and the supporting tones of the band come in a hollow embrace. It is a slightly cavernous effect surrounding them which is almost as if the vocals were recorded in a large cold bathroom rather than where the rest of the songs were laid down. The fact it cannot stop the songs making such strong impressions is testament to the band and the writing but it does just temper and stop an impressive debut from being a truly striking introduction.

Nevertheless Wolfetone has set down a potent marker and base for their next steps, and bred a definite appetite for their highly enjoyable sounds with their impressive release.

Silence Is Acquiescence is available from February 23rd @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/silence-is-acquiescence/id955979528 and through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/wolfetoneuk

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Leopards – Future||Fate||Forever

Leopards Online Promo Shot

It seems like we have been enthusing over a torrent of impressive debuts from and introductions to truly promising bands this year already, and taking their place in that list is certainly UK alternative rock band Leopards who are about to unveil their new EP Future ||Fate ||Forever. A five track blaze of melodic rock infectiousness and alternative tenacity, the encounter is a highly appetising and imaginatively crafted adventure which maybe does not quite push the band head and shoulders above a flock of similarly flavoured propositions but definitely allows the band’s presence and potential to shine and grab attention.

The Manchester quintet emerged in 2010, weaving in inspirations from bands such as Mallory Knox, Don Broco, Natives, and Lower Than Atlantis into their own fresh ideation. Their live presence was soon putting the band on the map locally as did with broadening success early releases, though it was the release of the track Have Heart last year that a wider attention was nudged. It is a spotlight easy to see being properly awakened by the Romesh Dodangoda (Kids in Glass Houses, Funeral For A Friend and Twin Atlantic) produced Future||Fate||Forever hereon in though.

That notion is soon raising its suggestiveness with opening track Save Yourself. In a single breath the potent rhythms of drummer Rhys Gibson are framing a blaze of melodic enterprise cast by the guitars of Ben Corbett-Mills and Craig Henderson, through which a just as flavoursome bassline from Billy Fletcher adds its shadowed expression. The strong start relaxes in intensity as the swiftly impressing vocals of Jenna Clare begin unveiling the song’s narrative, a dip embracing her warm tones but keeping the already fascinating character of the song as potent as before. The PromoImage-2-600x599feisty hard rock weight and energy begins lapping over ears with tidal regularity as the whole song progresses, ebbing and flowing across its length and around the broadening enterprise of guitars and vocals. Speared by the rhythmic tenacity of Fletcher and Gibson, the track continues to grow, edging nearer to a climactic chorus which steals the song’s show ultimately as Clare roars with passion and a melodic tang which grips her delivery.

The impressive start continues to hold ears and attention tight as both Promise Me and Take Control dance with creative vivacity over the senses. The first of the two twists and flirts with a pop rock invention and unpredictable imagination next, occasionally stopping in its tracks for brief seconds to wrong-foot and spark new adventure to the superbly spun sound. Aligning itself to this is an anthemic bellow which again finds its focal point through a pungent chorus that easily recruits the listener’s own endeavours to its cause. Its successor bounds in with similar energy and creative hunger, and again is unafraid to shuffle up its attack and flavours. It is, as the EP, probably fair to say that the songs are not creating new templates for alternative and melodic rock, but equally they bring a fresh and invigorating proposition which leaves pleasure full and interest in Leopards eager.

The outstanding Broken Family steps up after, this a song which in some ways draws on the existing qualities and successes of the previous songs on the EP to shape its own infectious temptation. There is maybe a touch of similarity across the quintet of songs as well as an unmistakeable Paramore essence, but each and proven powerfully here, explores its own distinct and captivating identity whilst keeping ears and emotions firmly enthused. The catchiness of the song is irresistible pop rock at its most potent, firing up body and imagination ready for the closing charms of April. The final song emerges on an almost tribal spread of rhythms, Gibson instantly enslaving an instinctive like as Clare croons with siren-esque elegance within the melodic hug of guitars aligned to darker bass shadows. Once again Leopards hold attention and pleasure in the palm of their creative hands, something Future||Fate||Forever does from start to finish with ease.

The EP is a thoroughly enjoyable first major prod at national attention, and confirmation for those in the know that Leopards is a band with very healthy and impacting horizons just waiting for them if they want them.

The Future||Fate||Forever EP is available from February 23rd physically @ http://leopards.bigcartel.com/product/future-fate-forever-physical-ep and digitally through all stores.

http://www.weareleopards.co.uk/

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

The Permanent Smilers – One Real Big Identity Crisis

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One Real Big Identity Crisis, the new album from UK band The Permanent Smilers, is a release with no apparent direction or framework to its intent and enterprise; a release which basically lives up to its title but boy is it a slab of irresistible fun. Through thirteen songs, band and album take on a torrent of different styles and nostalgic flavours which really should not work alongside each other as coherently as they do, and all come with a humour and mischief which adds to rather than overrides the adventure of the individual characters. It is slightly deranged but not chaotic and thoroughly unpredictable yet not messy considering the vast sounds employed from song to song. Most of all though it is simply a compelling proposition which comes from left-field, keeps its heart there, and leaves the most enjoyable experience in its wake.

There is little we can tell you about the band itself, though The Permanent Smilers is fronted by Richard Lemongrower who was the songwriter behind Norwich band The Lemongrowers, a band releasing two albums on Noisebox at some point in time. Produced with Jonny Cole and mixed by David Pye, One Real Big Identity Crisis takes little time in lighting ears and imagination, though it opens with maybe its weakest song. That is a little misleading as it takes a song to get a handle, or try to, on the release anyway but certainly Identity Crisis did not really grip attention as much as elsewhere and left thoughts with a slight wondering of what have we got ourselves into. Strongly swung rhythms and similarly intensive riffs clasp ears within the first breath of the song, their bait a jabbing lure against the unpolished yet engaging tones of Richard. It is an easily flowing and energetic slice of rock ‘n’ roll with the bass of Jonny Cole pungent bait at the centre of the stomp. Truthfully there is little wrong with the song but it lacks a spark in its presence which evades the reaction it probably deserves and is easy to imagine being found with others.

The good if unsure start is soon a thing of the past as Uh-Oh takes over with its festive folk swagger and emerging carnival like devilment. Sporting a splash of Tankus The Henge to its relaxed but vibrant stroll, the song is a constant swing of melodic hips as it moves towards an unexpected and mouth-watering slip into a Dukes of Stratosphear like ethereal psychedelic charm and climate, returning back into festive mood soon after as if it had just emerged from a dip in the sea. The song is fascinating and bewitching, and just the first of numerous adventures into different landscapes, as shown next by the punk pop devilry of You Know Where To Go. Bred from seventies power pop and carrying a mix of The Flys and The Lurkers to its hookery, the song just hits the sweet spot with its insatiable energy and mischief, before making way for the more relaxed melodic embrace of Elastic. The keys and guitars of Richard weave another enthralling web of sound here, this time with a sniff of sixties pop to it which is punctuated by the crisp beats of drummer Pete Fraser and dark bass lures of Cole. By its close, the song somehow becomes a thumping anthem without losing any of its melodic and gentle elegance, a potent feat for any song to offer.

Both Just No Good and It Doesn’t Work Anymore keep album and ears bouncing with energy and pleasure, the first using a garage rock spicing again teased by a sixties almost Doors like toxicity, whilst the second again spawning from the same kind of seeding brings a rawer punk grouchiness with its presence. Each has feet and emotions joining their rigorous coaxing before Ghosts allows a breather for the body if not the imagination with its Simon and Garfunkel meets Burt Bacharach like embrace. The brass persuasion of Dave Land seductively flames over similarly captivating keys and vocal caresses through the song but as always there is a scent of devilment to the song with thoughts wondering at times if they should be enjoying this as much as they are. There is no escaping its thick charm though.

The next pair of songs brings a rich sense of XTC to their enterprise and persuasion, Rebel broadening that over time with a seventies kissed soar of progressive fuelled psyche rock whilst its successor, Voodoo has the stamp of Andy Partridge to its flirtatious pop and virulent enterprise. The pair leaves nostalgia glazed lips licked and, through the latter especially, ears basking in psyche pop of the most delicious kind complete with jazzy brass and funk spirited unpredictability.

You Know When To Go dives straight back into punk infused rock ‘n’ roll for its brief but sparkling instrumental before Unforseen manages to conjure an encounter which recalls the quirky indie pop of The Monochrome Set and the plainer but no less tasty essence of Tom Robinson. The song alternatively stomps and swirls around ears, every passing hook and melody it conjures an intriguing and quaint yet voracious tease before it moves off into the distance allowing the outstanding See Through You to make its lingering mark. Acoustically shaped with an avalanche of panzer gun delivered rhythms, the song initially is a smouldering and majestic sway of sound. It subsequently explodes though into a tempest of energy and revelry which only lifts a great song to a heady plateau. Imagine the volatile energy of De Staat at their most devilish with the epidemic hunger of eighties punk/power pop and you get a sense of the glorious treat.

One Real Big Identity Crisis closes with the acoustic lullaby of Sleepyhead, the album ending as it started with a track which does not catch the ardour triggered elsewhere but certainly graces ears with tantalising propositions. This album is one unexpected and seriously enjoyable adventure; not breaking down boundaries or venturing into the unknown but never providing a moment when you are not surprised or wrapped up in its refreshing simplicity woven by skill and invention. There is only time left to lick lips all over again as we close off and dive straight back into The Permanent Smilers’ irresistible arms, something we suggest you do too upon release.

One Real Big Identity Crisis is released in April via IRL Records with new single Identity Crisis out in March.

http://www.thepermanentsmilers.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Permanent-Smilers/1539697962929725

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today