Billy Momo – Drunktalk (album)

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With the first two breath-taking singles taken from their new album providing spicy and diversely flavoursome appetisers, Swedish urban-folk collective Billy Momo faced not only eager anticipation but greedily demanding expectations here, and most likely everywhere, in regard to Drunktalk. Of course it and the seven-piece from Stockholm swiftly fed all those wants, unsurprisingly but thrillingly casting fifteen songs which croon, seduce, and romance ears and imagination. Admittedly still those early tracks, I’ve Got You and the album’s title track, remain as the pinnacles of the release and enjoyment but every caress and twist of Drunktalk leaves the richest transfixing experience and pleasure.

Originally a duo brought to life by Tomas Juto and Oskar Hovell, and now a riveting septet with Tony Lind, Mårten Forssman, Oscar Harryson, Christopher Anderzon, and Andreas Prybil alongside the founders, Billy Momo has persistently sparked attention and potent support since the self-release of debut album Ordinary Men in the closing shadows of 2011. It is fair to say though that the past few months, especially around those previously mentioned singles has seen the band become a keenly sought presence further afield, the UK and US especially. it Is easy to expect that Drunktalk will only accentuate and accelerate that spotlight and hunger, such its emotional and inventive charm alongside mouth-watering variety and adventure.

The album opens with the first single taken from its fascinating body, I’ve Got You providing an irresistible introduction and scene setter for the album. Gentle and endearing melodies from guitar and keys embrace ears and thoughts first, their romance soon coloured and reinforced by an emotive caress of strings as the musical narrative slowly broadens. The start alone is inescapably bewitching but once the strings reveal a thicker drama with the deep throated croon of the cello adding its voice, the song is sheer majesty. Their scything strokes of orchestral incitement provide exhilarating bait to which gripping harmonic vocals and the melodic theatre of the song unveil new virulent temptation. The baroque aired song is quite glorious, as on its first unveiling last year still one of the most striking and compelling songs heard anywhere.

Wishing Ain’t No Sin leaps on ears with the same attention grabbing quality straight after, its banjo twang and devilish enterprise a unique mix of seemingly dark country and Nordic folk. The song strolls with a creative and melodic swagger, a strong lure which, with again impressive vocal combination and colour, becomes an instant addictive lure for the feet and voice of the listener. It is a potency virtually all songs upon Drunktalk possess, especially the album’s following title track. Once more the opening of the song ensures body and mind are gripped before it fully reveals itself, here resonating ticking and clunky chain swipes startling before a wonderfully dark melodic and the ever outstanding vocal union emerge around them. The song is pure intoxication, voice and keys as infectiously seductive as strings and harmonica, and like the opener but in its own deceptively contagious way, infests and enthrals the psyche and heart. Think Nick Cave and Helldorado with a splash of Dennis Hopper Choppers, and you have an inkling of the alchemy at work.

The high bar set by the album continues with the catchy It’s Mine, a song starting with mischief in its melodic tempting and an increasing vaudevillian nature to its gypsy folk revelry. Once more it is impossible for body, voice, and emotions not to be enlisted in the enticement of the irrepressibly magnetic adventure, its enticement the appetiser for further unpredictable variety with firstly the soulful Keep It Unreal and straight after the fascinating proposition of Shine Like The Devil. The first of the pair also offers a blues and pop colouring to its warmly swaying and again contagious proposal whilst the second weaves in emotive shadows and haunting ambiences into its tapestry of golden harmonies and radiant melodic twists.

The sultry seventies psych kissed climate of Keep Dreaming comes next. It bursts from an almost melancholic bordering on portentous intro into a feisty stride of beats and guitar invention within delicious harmonies and emotional reflection, musically and lyrically. Maybe more of a slow burner than previous tracks it still has ears and thoughts bound before letting the country spiced Oh Lord and the following La La Land to have their moment. The first of the pair is an easy listen with plenty to intrigue and provoke the imagination but fails to find that final spark to inflame the passions, though again it is a constantly welcome companion for time and ears. Its successor as you might suspect has plenty of la-las to its romp but also a web of fleet footed beats and heated melodies which with the equally ripe vocals, provides an anthemic lure.

Setting things up with the western bar room quaintness of Drifting Away, the album hits party time with The Weekend, its blues rock/ jazz folk dance just as eagerly spiced by a country rock liveliness, a mix soon having feet tapping heartily and without inhibition. The two tracks continue the striking landscape of new flavours and ideation within Drunktalk, a quality continued through the two ballad bred encounters of the cinematically aired and emotionally provocative Headlights, and the haunted elegance of Waiting for Walls. The latter of the two ventures back into that earlier vaudeville like spicing, this time though staying in more emotionally shadowed and darkly mellow corners. They are two more tracks which may not manage to live up to the early heights of the album, but each offers something engrossing and spellbinding in their own distinct ways.

New Grounds provides the meatiest moment of the album, keys and energy having a muscular edge to their commanding lures whilst another country seeded spicing colludes with tangy melodic drama and a different vocal offering, in a pulsating stomp. The track never slips its reins but is the perfect tease because of it, relishing its moments of lively quickstepping to raise the temptation to even greater potency.

The acoustic croon of Let’s Make The Night Last Long brings the magnificent Drunktalk to a close, the album everything hoped for after the band’s previous singles but so much more too. Every song has its own identity and character in sound and intent but all sit seamlessly in the whole romance of the must investigate album. Just be warned though that once a song like I’ve Got You has its seeds fermenting inside, there is no escape.

Drunktalk is available on Hype Music from February 2nd

https://www.facebook.com/billymomomusic

RingMaster 02/02/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Los Trasgos Muertos – Eponymous EP

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Creating garage rock with a psyche rock aspiratory system, or is it psyche rock with garage rock blood…however you wish to describe it, UK rockers Los Trasgos Muertos have woven a seriously compelling encounter with their self-titled debut EP. Consisting of four-tracks which simply whisk the imagination away into a kaleidoscope of seventies seeded adventure whilst immersing ears into a web of bluesy sonic curiosity, the band’s first offering is quite simply a delicious introduction.

Los Trasgos Muertos hails from Manchester and consists of Captain Reed (bass/vocals/organ), Von Beek (guitar/vocals), and Il Fleishe (drums), three protagonists no strangers to each other from their individual time and experiences in varied bands over the years in their city’s music scene. Once united, the band whilst taking inspirations from the likes of Billy Childish, Thee Oh Sees, Hi Ho, and Ty Segall into their own invention was soon clutching a horde of songs ready for recording, which they did at Eve Studios in Bredbury. Now the sultrily flamed first encounter is upon us all and what a treat it really is.

It all kicks off with Fire In The Sky, a song swiftly binding ears in a spicy blues crafted groove and bass grumbles as beats flash their sinews across the senses. It is soon striding with tenacious energy and creative enthusiasm, hooks and the ever increasing lure of the grooves as tangy and contagious as the lively vocals and melodic endeavour. There is an earthiness to the song which easily grabs ears whilst equally there is a drama to every psychedelic clothed note and anthemic swing. The track continues to bluster like an autumn wind, warming the bones whilst offering haunting shadows and pagan like unpredictability.

The following Step One makes a less spectacular entrance but soon has senses and thoughts wrapped in its opening mesmeric melodic shimmer and vocal embrace. Soon a sixties beat feel adds Picture 84it’s tempting to the garage rock stomp as the song hits the ground with a lively gait. As its predecessor the virulently catchy encounter swiftly ignites an even greater appetite and satisfaction whilst being relentlessly fascinating though its expectations defeating adventure, a quality which is even more exploited by It Rises!

The third track makes the best entrance of all, its initial slap of beats the trigger to a winy blues rock bred groove which coincidently is almost straight out of the major seduction that is the Karn8’s song Sick. It was an essence extraordinary there and just as irresistible here with its particular haunting colouring. Around it the smouldering tapestry of the song flows like sonic honey, sticky and flavoursome melodies gluing their lures to ears and emotions as the increasingly impressive vocals add their distinct spice to the brilliant proposition. Sometimes there is no escape from the touch of a song no matter what and here is one of the most stirring examples.

The release closes with the dark romance of Roll With The Punches, a track merging the garage punk of The Orson Family and the fuzzabilly styling of Eighteen Nightmares At The Lux with the garage rock styling of The Electric Eels and the psyche temptation of The Doors. It is an enthralling almost intrusive embrace of body and thought, a mouth-watering and riveting end to an outstanding debut.

The Los Trasgos Muertos conjure their own world and psychological adventure with their strangely familiar but openly unique sound; one already ears and appetite are impatiently waiting for more of.

The Los Trasgos Muertos EP is available from February 2nd

http://lostrasgosmuertos.com/

RingMaster 02/02/2015

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From Kid – You Can Have All The Wonders

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It does not take long to understand the buzz around and anticipation for You Can Have All The Wonders, the debut album from Swiss electronic folk/pop band From Kid. Within a couple of songs the twelve track proposition has ears seduced and emotions invigorated with its refreshing presence. Embracing as big an array of emotions as it does sounds the release is a captivating romance for the senses and imagination. It persistently impresses and thrills whether it is charming the listener with a melancholic seduction or revelling in an intoxicating tenacity.

Recorded in an old farmhouse in Switzerland, You Can Have All The Wonders is the majestic invention of duo Andrin Berchtold and Gian Reto Camenisch. The pair has upon their first album, entwined virulent melodic temptation with warm immersive harmonies all within emotionally coloured atmospheres. Aided by Gianluca Giger and Sascha Frischknecht, the pair’s songs inhabit sonic landscapes which are broadly ethereal and reflectively intimate simultaneously, yet each discovering its own distinct character and gentle but striking drama. They engulf the senses and thoughts with a lingering persuasion, each slow evocative hug or lively dance as inescapable long-term as they are ridiculously infectious face to face.

Emerging on a distant breeze of sonic coaxing, opening track Applause is swiftly stealing firm attention as a mesmeric charm of vocals strokes ears from within an ever closing melodic ambience. Beats rumble in the background as does a feistier agitation of electronic tempting, their presence seemingly growing impatient so it is not long before the song expels its shadow wrapped breath of potent keys and electro imagination. The glorious vocals of Berchtold and Camenisch steal focus and song though; every note and syllable shared an infectious seducing with shadowy undertones.

The impressive start is matched by the more rigorously opening Need of Our Skin, a similarly relaxed and slightly spatial exploration of sound and emotions. Arguably the expression of the piano has even greater drama in every single note, that evocative touch slightly portentous but tempered by the melodic mediation of the sensational vocals. There is a warmth to the song but as suggested also a colder angst, both perfectly crafted by the sounds without any favouring so the track is as rounded and magnetic as possible; something easily applying to the energetic shuffle of Come In which comes next. Electro pop with sturdier rhythmic bait, the song swings with the senses for a seriously infectious dance just irresistible to feet and voice.10252170_983348065015557_3211684565642470918_n

Itself brings a folkish beauty next which certainly has a scent of Simon and Garfunkel to it at times, though the song equally develops its own unique weave of voice and melodies over an almost cinematic electronic soundscape. Its harmonic flame makes way for the addictive imagination of This is All, another ridiculously contagious stroll which flirts with a techno and synth pop colouring for its fluid mix of curvy saunters and bouncing energy. There is nothing but peaks across You Can Have All The Wonders, but this track is one with snow on its lofty heights.

Both the easy going and perky sounds of Wonders and the gentle romancing of Water Flows keep album and listener wrapped in each other’s arms, the first crazily catchy and impossible to resist and the second a smooth glaze of emotional and melodic humidity. Each is individual in presence to themselves and other tracks, but united in exciting and enslaving attention and an increasingly greedy appetite for the album, a hunger sparked again by the outstanding Colors and its hypnotic coaxing bred from a minimalistic but binding guitar melody. Around it though, air is a building tension whilst vocals and bass probe from different ends of light to collude in tantalising the senses.

Closing Scene fascinates next, vocals and keys bringing melodies casting a sunset of warm beauty but brought back to earth by the wonderfully sombre almost funereal ambience of the surrounding synths and the sobering pyres of brass fuelled sound. The track is enthralling, quite breath-taking in its dark way as it takes the listener into calm but haunted waters before freeing them again for the carnival-esque swing of Waltz. With a slither of gypsy and vaudeville folk to its irresistible minuet, the song sculpts another major temptation beautifully teased and presented by From Kid.

The closing pair of Underground and Dead Ends struggle to match the previous song but each leaves rich satisfaction, the first through its unpredictable and almost volatile energy and the last with its humid and dramatic atmospheric and vocal balladry. You Can Have All The Wonders ends in safe and inventive hands, and as much as we looked for something to temper our enthusiasm just a touch in these songs and elsewhere for the release, truly this is an album to unreservedly share with every dark clouded day and summer festivity.

You Can Have All The Wonders is available now on CD and digitally via Sonic Service @ http://smarturl.it/fromkid

http://www.fromkid.com/

RingMaster 02/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

http://www.thereputationlabel.today

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Digits – Footprints And Embers EP

 

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Having caught ears and attention with promise soaked debut EP Acquiesce To Violence in 2013, UK alternative rockers Digits return with its successor Footprints And Embers. All the thoughts bred by its predecessor remain with the new EP, the potential of the band growing into a really striking proposition ahead as persuasive as before. The new four song encounter also shows a solid growth and freshness to the last release but equally carries a rawness at times which occasionally numbs the creative ideation and potency being shown. Despite that, Digits remains a band to keep under close view with the imagination of big things in their future.

The time between releases has been a trying time for the band it is fair to say. Acquiesce to Violence found itself earning plenty of praise and support as well as having tracks gracing cover CDs of Rocksound and Big Cheese Magazines whilst the band shared stages with the likes of Margera, Feed The Rhino, Marmozets, and played the Make A Scene Festival with the likes of Funeral For A Friend, The Blackout and Hacktivist. Since then though injuries have accosted the band; vocalist/guitarist Chris Bradley damaging ligaments in his ankles, guitarist Craig Strawbridge managing to cut off half his thumb, bassist Stu Latham damaging his back, and drummer Dan Cooper having to leave the band due to persistent problems with his wrists. The Newcastle quartet has endured and overcome though, and with Matt Hickman now swinging the sticks and equipped with a host of new songs, Digits are forging on as they unleash Footprints And Embers to pick up from where they were before being temporarily derailed last year.

Embers starts things off, emerging from a distant wash of sound and prowling forward with pungent rhythms, caustic riffs, and a spiralling lure of strong melodic enterprise. It is a strong start Digits coverbut turned into a less successful moment by the blazing roar of raw vocals from Bradley, his tones bullish and clad in a post hardcore texturing which in turn permeates the song and mutes its initial potency. It is something ears soon acclimatise to though, especially when the song grows again by relaxing into a mellow passage with similarly delivered vocals. Courted by a great bass tempting, alluring guitar endeavour seems to light the touch paper to another explosion of intensity and passion. The song ebbs and flows like this throughout its presence, not always winning its persuasion entirely but with wicked grooves and an irresistible anthemic rhythmic baiting from Hickman, the song wins its argument, and becoming stronger and more potent with every listen.

As mentioned the opener has a post hardcore like nature compared to the alternative rock aggression of the following Dysphoria, a song which as some on the last EP, finds a Reuben like essence to its contagious lure of riffs and hooks. There is another drift into an emotive calm in the song which works but maybe not quite as powerfully as it might against the otherwise tenacious and confrontational qualities of the track. Nevertheless, it is a pleasing and compelling lure which overcomes a slight wavering of vocal quality with ease.

The next up Parachutes is of similar breeding, its sinews flexing with every forceful beat and abrasing riff as vocals unite to push the just as fiery narrative of the song through ears. There is a rage to the song which is cleverly tempered yet enhanced by the marauding rhythms and sonic enterprise, they in turn seeming to encourage a spicier vocal ferocity and control. It and its predecessor take the honours on the EP, reminding and pushing forward the reason why the last EP suggested Digits was a brewing storm to watch.

The calmer skies of Eros concludes the album; the song a melodic hug within brooding bass shadows. Bradley proves his vocal strength on the song, bringing Paul Heaton like tone to his delivery, and at times the melodic breath of the song does have a Housemartins like croon before it erupts into a final blaze of roaring intensity speared by a quite inescapable hook. Again it gives thoughts a nudge to the depths and potential of the band whilst providing ears with another highly satisfying offering.

Digits still feel like they are still looking for their own specific sound and have yet to fully tap into the certain potential within them, but with releases like Footprints And Embers it is no hardship to carry on waiting and enjoying the band’s growth.

The Footprints And Embers EP is available digitally from February 2nd via iTunes.

https://www.facebook.com/Digitsuk

RingMaster 02/02/0215

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from