The Deathtrip – Deep Drone Master

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Deep Drone Master is a fascination proposition whose tracks either has ears and emotions in rapture or certainly seriously contemplating what they have undergone and wanting more. That is how it ignited our personal reactions; at times the debut album from The Deathtrip sparking lustful ardour and in other moments simply has thoughts and emotions deliberating eagerly, with occasionally undecided results, the undeniably impressive provocations. Ultimately though the Svart Records released ravaging is an inescapable lure emerging as one of the more compelling black metal encounters heard recent times and very easy to recommend to all genre fans.

The Deathtrip goes right back to 2003, its seeds sown with British guitarist Host and his early compositions. Raw in atmosphere and sound with a badgering heart of hypnotic and repetitious structures, perfectly evidenced upon the album, Host’s sounds came to the attention of Aldrahn (Dødheimsgard /Thorns) who offered any assistance to the project, subsequently becoming the vocalist and chief lyricist. An early demo led to Snorre Ruch of Thorns showing interest in helping on a full-length album which he eventually produced. Recorded, re-recorded, and mixed over several years, with bassist Jon Wesseltoft and drummer Storm completing the line-up for the recording, Deep Drone Master finally had its worldwide unleashing via Svart a few weeks back and it is easy to feel it will be leaving lingering scars for black metal to exalt over.

The album’s Intro is a sinister cinematic incitement, danger leering from the shadows as life goes on seemingly unaware. Its portentous suggestiveness is soon lost in the tsunami of caustic riffs and battering rhythms which descend on the senses through Flag of Betrayal, their ferocity bound in spicy sonic acidity. It is fiercely alluring entrance, building further threat and fury as the distinctive tones of Aldrahn roar and brawl with ears. First listen suggested a clash between his bear like delivery and the scorched sonic and dour melodic flow of the sounds but it was a conflict soon winning thoughts and igniting tracks to greater effect. The unrelenting tempest of the track is a gripping onslaught but it is the acidic drone which most ignites the passions, a serpentine seduction which makes certain tracks elevate far above others, as shown by the next up Dynamic Underworld. As potent and impressive as its predecessor was, it instantly has ears and imagination lost in rapturous bliss as the guitar of Host winds a searing tendril of melodic causticity around the senses. Its nags ears with a glazed expression; mesmerising as it expels a monotonous seduction to irresistible effect. Around it this though the song has plenty to flirt with too, slow footed beats thumping with predatory intent as Aldrahn expels the narrative with mischief and drama whilst bass and further guitar enterprise roam with merciless persuasion. The song is exceptional; the best on the album and for personal tastes the moment the album truly taps into the psyche.

Both Sewer Heart and Cocoons seize attention with voracious onslaughts, the first almost scavenging emotions with its furnace of erosive sonic designs again bound in coarse textures and gutturally rasping vocals. Its successor is similar in many ways, its core a barbarous incessant torrent of malicious intent and creative fury but arguably even darker and hungrier than the previous aural ravishment. Both tracks have a swing to their bleak landscapes and enthralling repetition driven grooves which, without matching the pure toxic manna of Dynamic Underworld, keep imagination and emotions intrigued and hungry. Something Making Me has no problem with either, its rhythmic rampancy and sonic teasing perfectly aligned to a tangy groove which simply worms under the skin. The track is another which simply festers in dark majesty and relentless persuasion, almost insidious in its addictiveness and infectious fluidity which sees even the vocals of Aldrahn develop a bruising swagger to match the insatiable magnetism of Host’s invention.

Cosmic Verdict taps another vein of lustful submission, the unfaltering drone of its sonic grooving a venomous temptress in a maelstrom of spite, so much so that even when it relents and lets the heavier savage terrain of the song have its moment, it is still a lingering seducing that ears are impatient to have back scorching their flesh. Its tempestuous alchemy is followed by the rapacious climate of Something Growing in the Trees, the sublimely evil and deliciously toxic song a crawling beast fingering ears and psyche with salacious predation as a flavoursome southern twang veins its corrosive haunting.

From the corrosive turbulence and fury of A Foot In Each Hell, a track impressing without leaving a deep mark though it has moments which spark extra satisfaction to be fair, the album closes with Syndebukken. The final track is an evolving adventure of sonic niggling and atmospheric exploration, its body cavernous and soul Cimmerian, but as everywhere with plenty of enthralling discordant sculpted expressive under an emotionally brooding ambience.

That pretty much sums up Deep Drone Master, a nightmarish emprise which can devour the light of the soul or inflame primal cravings, very often at the same time. Despite certain aspects of the album spellbinding the passions far more than others, The Deathtrip and first album makes for one seriously exciting black metal corruption which can only be heartily recommended.

Deep Drone Master is available now via Svart Records @ http://svartrecords.com/shoppe/home/2739-the-deathtrip-deep-drone-master-cd.html

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Deathtrip/1454994818117379

RingMaster 05/12/2014

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